UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 

(MARK ONE)

 

[X]     ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014

 

OR

 

[   ]     TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For transition period from ________ to __________

 

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 000-21846

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

NEVADA 13-3632859
(State or other jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization) Identification No.)

 

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660,  
San Diego, California 92122
(Address of principal executive office) (Zip Code)

 

REGISTRANT'S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE (858) 459-7800

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT:

 

TITLE OF EACH CLASS

 

NONE

NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE ON WHICH REGISTERED

 

NONE

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED UNDER SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:

 

COMMON STOCK--$.001 PAR VALUE

(TITLE OF CLASS)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [_]  No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes [_]  No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X]  No [_]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X]  No [_]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [_]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [_] Accelerated filer [_]
Non accelerated filer [_] Smaller reporting company [X]

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes [_]  No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of September 30, 2013 was approximately $36 million, computed by reference to the closing sale price of the common stock of $0.17 per share on the OTC Bulletin Board on September 30, 2013. Shares of common stock held by each executive officer and director and by each person who owns 10% or more of the outstanding common stock have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. The determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

 

The number of shares of the common stock of the registrant outstanding as of July 9, 2014 was 253,395,651.

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  

    PAGE
PART I.
     
Item 1. Description of Business 1
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors 11
     
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 24
     
Item 2. Properties 24
     
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 25
     
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 25
     
PART II.
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant's Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 26
     
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 30
     
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 31
     
Item 7A Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 42
     
Item 8. Financial Statements 43
     
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 43
     
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 43
     
Item 9B. Other Information 44
     
PART III.
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 45
     
Item 11. Executive Compensation 51
     
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 55
     
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence 57
     
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 58
     
PART IV.
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statements 59
     
Signatures   65
     
Certifications    

  

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

GENERAL OVERVIEW

 

We create medical devices to address unmet therapeutic needs in infectious disease, cancer and other life-threatening conditions.  Our lead product is the Aethlon Hemopurifier®, a first-in-class device that selectively targets the rapid elimination of circulating viruses and tumor-secreted exosomes that promote cancer progression.  At present, we also operate under two Department of Defense (DOD) contracts through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) related to the development of a sepsis treatment device and we maintain majority ownership of Exosome Sciences, Inc., a diagnostic organization developing exosome-based products to diagnose and monitor cancer, infectious disease and neurological disorders.

 

The Aethlon Hemopurifier®

 

The Aethlon Hemopurifier® is a first-in-class device that selectively targets the rapid elimination of circulating viruses and tumor-secreted exosomes that promote cancer progression. More specifically, the Hemopurifier® addresses antiviral drug-resistance in Hepatitis-C Virus (HCV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected individuals; serves as a countermeasure against viral pathogens not addressed by drug or vaccine therapies; and represents the first therapeutic strategy to address cancer promoting exosomes. In clinical studies conducted in India, safety and efficacy observations of Hemopurifier® therapy have been observed in both HCV and HIV infected individuals. We are now preparing to initiate the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved studies of Hemopurifier® therapy in the United States.

 

The Hemopurifier® in Cancer

 

In a May 2014 review article sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), we were the sole organization referenced to have a therapeutic candidate to address tumor-secreted exosomes, which have been discovered to suppress the immune system of cancer patients, seed the creation and spread of metastasis, promote angiogenesis, trigger resistance to chemotherapy, and transport PD-1, PDL-1, VEGF, CTLA-4, EGRF and other primary cancer therapeutic targets of the biopharmaceutical industry. To date, we have demonstrated that our Hemopurifier® can capture exosomes underlying a broad-spectrum of cancer indications and as a result of our discoveries, we have already received issued patent protection for our cancer treatment endeavors.

 

We believe Hemopurifier® therapy can play a central role in the emerging immuno-oncology industry as an adjunct strategy to eliminate circulating exosomes without adding drug toxicity to established and emerging cancer therapies. The ability to inhibit exosome immune suppression in combination with drugs designed to stimulate the immune response is an especially compelling premise. Citigroup analysts predict the immuno-oncology market will grow to $35 billion per year and that 50% of all cancer treatments will be immune-based in 10 years. It should be noted that tumor-secreted exosomes are sometimes referred to as “circulating microvesicles” or “extracellular vesicles”.

 

The Hemopurifier® to Address Antiviral Drug-Resistance

 

The Hemopurifier® provides a novel methodology to target mutant viral strains that trigger antiviral drug resistance in both HIV and HCV infections. Based on previous studies we conducted in India, safety and efficacy observations of Hemopurifier® therapy have been observed in both disease conditions. As a result of these outcomes, we now have the opportunity to initiate the first FDA approved studies of Hemopurifier® therapy in the United States. We recently disclosed that this study will enroll HCV-infected patients and will be conducted at DaVita MedCenter Dialysis in Houston, Texas. Successful completion of this study will allow us the opportunity to initiate pivotal studies that are required for market clearance to treat HCV and other disease conditions in the United States. Our study protocol calls for the enrollment of ten HCV-infected ESRD patients who have not received any pharmaceutical therapy for their HCV infection for at least 30 days. The protocol will consist of a control phase of three consecutive standard dialysis treatments during week one followed by the inclusion of our Hemopurifier during a total of six dialysis sessions conducted during weeks two and three. The rate of adverse events observed during the Hemopurifier therapy phase will be compared to the rate experienced during the control phase. Per-treatment changes of viral load will be observed through quantitative PCR analysis. Additionally, we plan to measure the number of HCV viral copies captured within the Hemopurifier during each treatment session.

 

In HCV care, the Hemopurifier® is positioned to address drug resistance associated with emerging all-antiviral therapies and also to accelerate HCV RNA depletion at the outset of peginterferon+ribavirin (PR) therapy. Previously, we conducted HCV treatment studies at the Apollo Hospital, Fortis Hospital, and most recently the Medanta Medicity Institute (Medanta) in India.

 

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In the Medanta study, HCV-infected individuals were enrolled to receive three six-hour Hemopurifier® treatments during the first three days of a 48-week peginterferon+ribavirin (PR) treatment regimen.  We reported that Hemopurifier® therapy was well tolerated and without device-related adverse events in twelve treated patients.  Of these twelve patients, nine completed the Hemopurifier-PR treatment protocol, including seven genotype-1 patients and two genotype-3 patients.  Seven of the nine patients (n=7/9) achieved a sustained virologic response (SVR), which is the clinical definition of treatment cure and is defined as undetectable HCV RNA 24-weeks after the completion of the 48-week PR drug regimen.  Both genotype-3 patients achieved a SVR (n=2/2), while five of the seven genotype-1 patients achieved a SVR (n=5/7).

Of the nine patients that completed the protocol, five (n=5/9) also achieved a rapid virologic response (RVR), defined as undetectable HCV RNA at day 30 of therapy.  RVR represents the clinical endpoint that best predicts SVR cure rates. As a point of reference, the landmark IDEAL Study of 3,070 HCV genotype-1 patients documented that only 10.35% (n=318/3070) of PR treated patients will achieve a RVR.  However, patients that achieved a RVR had SVR rates of 86.2% (n=274/318) versus SVR rates of 32.5% (n=897/2752) in non-RVR patients. 

Data from three patients were not included in the reported dataset.  Among the three patients was a genotype-5 patient who discontinued PR therapy at day 180, yet remained undetectable at 1.5 years after initiation of therapy.  The second was a genotype-3 patient who was unable to tolerate PR therapy and, as a result, discontinued PR therapy at day-90, yet was still undetectable one year after initiating therapy. The third patient, who had the genotype-1 virus, was reported undetectable at the completion of the 48-week PR treatment regimen, but SVR results for that patient are not expected until September of 2014.  During the study, our research team documented that the Hemopurifier could capture as many as 300 billion HCV copies during a single six-hour treatment.

 

In addition to treating HCV-infected individuals, we have conducted a single proof of principal treatment study related to the treatment of HIV. In the study, Hemopurifier® therapy reduced viral load by 93% in an HIV-AIDS infected individual without the administration of antiviral drug therapy.  The study protocol provided for 12 Hemopurifier® treatments, each four hours in duration, that were administered over the course of one month.  Researchers at a university have since discovered that the Hemopurifier® is able to capture exosomes that transport NEF protein, which is known to suppress the immune response in HIV-infected individuals.

 

The Hemopurifier® to Treat Viral Pathogens Not Addressed by Drug Therapies

 

The protocol design of our forthcoming FDA approved study was originally designed as a human safety challenge and model for addressing drug and vaccine resistant bioterror and emerging pandemic threats. In vitro studies conducted by leading government and non-government researchers have demonstrated that the Hemopurifier is able to capture a broad-spectrum of some of world’s deadliest viral pathogens. These include: Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF), H5N1 avian influenza (Bird Flu), H1N1 swine flu virus, the reconstructed 1918 influenza virus (r1918), West Nile virus (WNV) and Vaccinia and Monkeypox (MPV), which serve as models for human smallpox infection. Human efficacy studies are not permissible against high-threat bioterror and pandemic threats.

 

The Mechanism of the Aethlon Hemopurifier®

 

In design, our Hemopurifier® consists of the affinity lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) immobilized in the outer-capillary space of advanced plasma membrane technology. The design allows for extracorporeal therapeutic delivery to occur on standard CRRT and dialysis instruments already located in hospitals and clinics worldwide. The mechanism of the Hemopurifier® to rapidly eliminate a broad-spectrum disease targets is based on GNA’s ability to selectively bind unique high mannose signatures that are abundant on the surface of cancer-secreted exosomes and glycoproteins that reside on the outer membrane of infectious viral pathogens.

 

Exosome Sciences, Inc. (ESI), A Majority Owned Subsidiary of Aethlon Medical

 

In October 2013, we commenced operations of Exosome Sciences, Inc. (ESI), a majority owned subsidiary that develops exosome-based products to diagnose and monitor cancer, infectious disease and neurological disorders. Exosomes represent an optimal diagnostic target as diseased cells release them into bodily fluids such as urine and blood where they can be accessed. Our ESI subsidiary is developing non-invasive liquid biopsies based on the knowledge that these exosomes transport disease-origin markers underlying a wide-range of disease conditions. 

 

ESI also has the opportunity to leverage applications of our ELLSA™ exosome assay, which was originally developed by Aethlon Medical researchers to quantitate the ability of Hemopurifier® therapy to capture tumor-secreted exosomes from blood and other bodily fluids. ELLSA™ (enzyme-linked lectin-specific assay) has demonstrated the ability isolate exosomes underlying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), and all forms of cancer tested to date.

 

To lead our scientific endeavors at ESI, we retained two well-known thought leaders in the field of exosome biology. Dr. Douglas Taylor as ESI's Chief Scientific Officer and Dr. Cicek Gercel-Taylor as ESI's Clinical Research Director.

 

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About Dr. Douglas Taylor

 

Dr. Taylor discovered and pioneered the field of exosome biology and their role in intercellular communication and immune regulation. He has been in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health at the University of Louisville School of Medicine since 1992.  Dr. Taylor published the initial article describing circulating tumor exosomes/microvesicles in 1979 (Anal. Biochem. 98:53-59, 1979). The research in his laboratory has primarily focused on the release and consequences of exosomes from gynecologic cancer and lung tumors. Over the past 30+ years, Dr. Taylor has pioneered the isolation and characterization of circulating tumor-derived exosomes. His work has focused on characterization of circulating exosomes released by tumor cells for their role in immune regulation and induction of a pro-inflammatory tumor microenvironment. His work has demonstrated that the presence of specific circulating exosomal components have potential use as biomarkers for cancer patients.

 

About Dr. Cicek Gercel-Taylor

 

Dr. Cicek Gercel-Taylor has been a pioneer in the field of exosome biology and in defining their nucleic acid and protein cargoes. She previously has worked at the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health at the University of Louisville School of Medicine since 1992, and also is the Resident Research Coordinator. Her main research interest is in gynecological cancers, where she investigates the consequences of exosomes on genetic and epigenetic alterations induced in normal host target cells. She has explored the role of endogenous and exogenous hormones in modulating exosomal cargoes and the resulting effects on pathologic processes. A significant part of these investigations includes the identification and characterization of clinically relevant biomarkers, specifically proteomic and miRNA content of pathology-derived exosomes.

 

Since its launch, ESI researchers have successfully isolated brain-specific biomarkers associated with a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. The discoveries could have implications in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).  The research studies provided evidence that exosomes can serve as a "liquid biopsy" to diagnose neurologic conditions. While exosomes from the central nervous system have previously been identified in the cerebrospinal fluid, ESI researchers were able to identify exosomes carrying brain-specific markers tau, beta-amyloid, glycoprotein A2B5 and S100B protein in the peripheral circulation of affected individuals. The discoveries provide a basis for an exosome-based platform that could enable the simultaneous identification of multiple brain specific markers that are transported across the blood-brain barrier and into the circulatory system.

 

CTE is a progressive degenerative disease, which at present can only be definitively diagnosed postmortem.  CTE has been most commonly found at autopsy in former professional football players and has also been demonstrated to be prevalent in soldiers exposed to blast injury.  The hallmark of CTE is the accumulation of tau, an abnormal protein that strangles brains cells in areas that control memory, emotions and other functions.  TBI or repetitive brain trauma, including concussions and sub-concussive blows to the head contribute to the onset of CTE.

 

AD is the most common form of dementia.  There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death.  Beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles have long been recognized as a common pathologic hallmark of AD.  In 2010, it was estimated that 36 million people worldwide were living with AD.

 

The ESI research team also disclosed that it has been able to identify, quantify, and characterize circulating Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) exosomes, which hold promise as a disease biomarker to identify the early detection of this aggressive form of cancer and monitor response to therapy. GBM represents the most common, per capita costly and uniformly lethal primary brain tumor. GBM comprise 23% of primary brain tumors in the US and is the most commonly diagnosed brain tumor in adults aged 45-74 with men being more frequently diagnosed than women. The prognosis remains poor despite aggressive treatment modalities. Over the past decade, a median survival time of 12 months has only been marginally improved to 14.6 months as a result of advances in chemo/radiation and the use of molecularly targeted agents. The discovery of circulating GBM-exosomes offers a potential new paradigm in GBM clinical management through a platform technology to predict tumor regression or progression.

 

TRANSITION TO REVENUE STAGE ORGANIZATION

 

In May of 2011, we introduced and began marketing the Aethlon ADAPT™ system.  On September 30, 2011, we entered into a $6.8 million multi-year contract with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) resulting from our response to a program entitled “Dialysis-Like Therapeutics.”  Under this contract, our tasks include the development of a dialysis-like device to prevent sepsis, a fatal bloodstream infection that is often the cause of death in combat-injured soldiers.  

 

The initial award from DARPA was a fixed-price contract with potential total payments to us of $6,794,389 over the course of five years. As noted below, such contract was subsequently reduced by $858,491. Fixed price contracts require the achievement of multiple, incremental milestones to receive the full award during each year of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, we are required to perform certain incremental work towards the achievement of specific milestones against which we will invoice the government for fixed payment amounts.

 

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Originally, only the base year (year one contract) was effective for the parties, however, DARPA subsequently exercised the option on the second and third years of the contract. DARPA has the option to enter into the contract for years four and five. The milestones are comprised of planning, engineering and clinical targets, the achievement of which in some cases will require the participation and contribution of third party participants under the contract. There can be no assurance that we alone, or with third party participants, will meet such milestones to the satisfaction of the government and in compliance with the terms of the contract or that we will be paid the full amount of the contract revenues during any year of the remaining contract term. There can be no assurance that DARPA will exercise its option to continue the contract for years four and five. We commenced work under the contract in October 2011.

 

Due to budget restrictions within the Department of Defense, on February 10, 2014, DARPA reduced the scope of our contract in years three through five of the contract. The reduction in scope focused our research on exosomes, viruses and blood processing instrumentation. This scope reduction will reduce the possible payments under the contract by $858,491 over years three through five. We recently completed a rebudgeting of the expected costs on the remaining years of the DARPA contract based on the reduced milestones and have concluded that the reductions in our costs due to the scaled back level of work will almost entirely offset the anticipated revenue levels based on current assumptions.

 

Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014

 

As a result of achieving eight milestones in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we reported $1,466,482 in contract revenue for that fiscal year. The details of the eight milestones achieved during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 were as follows:

 

Milestone 2.3.2.2 – Formulate initial design work based on work from the previous phase. Begin to build and test selected instrument design and tubing sets. The milestone payment was $195,581. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able to formulate the initial design work and to build and test selected instrument design and tubing sets as part of our submission for approval. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone 2.3.2.2 – Write and test software and conduct ergonomic research. Begin discussions with the systems integrator. The milestone payment was $195,581. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We obtained wrote and tested software and conducted ergonomic research and began discussions with the systems integrator. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone 2.3.3.2 – Cartridge construction with optimized affinity matrix design for each potential target. Complete the capture agent screening. The milestone payment was $208,781. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We completed the cartridge construction with optimized affinity matrix design for each potential target and completed the capture agent screening. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone M5 – Target capture > 90% in 24 hours for at least three targets in blood or blood components. The milestone payment was $208,781. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able to capture > 90% in 24 hours for at least three of the agreed targets in blood or blood components. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone M3 – Conduct a series of experiments aimed at characterizing the contribution of several alternate fluidic designs and methods of perfusing plasma filters and affinity columns in the performance of affinity plasmapheresis. The milestone payment was $195,576. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we had conducted the relevant series of experiments. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone 2.4.2.1 – Evaluate contribution of manufacturing process variables to binding capacity of affinity resin. The milestone payment was $197,362. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we had evaluated the contribution of manufacturing process variables to binding capacity of affinity resin. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone 2.4.1.1 – Design and fabricate optimized configuration(s) of hemopurification device(s) that contain(s) a combination of hemofilters, plasma filters and affinity columns. The milestone payment was $186,164. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we had designed and fabricated optimized configuration of hemopurification devices. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

4
 

 

Milestone 2.4.2.3 – Perform biocompatibility tests for the combination ADAPT device to confirm the combination cartridge does not present additional risk. The milestone payment was $78,641. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we had performed biocompatibility tests for the combination ADAPT device to confirm the combination cartridge does not present additional risk. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2013

 

As a result of achieving six milestones in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, we reported $1,230,004 in contract revenue for that fiscal year. The details of the six milestones achieved during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 were as follows:

 

Milestone 2.2.2.3 – Perform preliminary quantitative real time PCR to measure viral load, and specific DNA or RNA targets. The milestone payment was $216,747. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able to measure viral load of one or more targets as part of our submission for approval. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone 2.2.1.4 – Obtain all necessary IRB documentation and obtain both institutional and Government approval in accordance with IRB documentation submission guidance prior to conducting human or animal testing. The milestone payment was $183,367. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts.  We obtained all of the required documentation from both institutional and Government authorities. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone M2 – Target capture > 50% in 24 hours for at least one target in blood or blood components. The milestone payment was $216,747. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able to capture > 50% in 24 hours of one of the agreed targets in blood or blood components. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.  

 

Milestone 2.3.3.1 – Build the ADAPT capture cartridges with the identified affinity agents. Measure the rate of capture of the specific targets from in ex vivo recirculation experiments from cell culture and blood. The milestone payment was $208,781. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able build the ADAPT capture cartridges with the identified affinity agents and to measure the rate of capture of the specific targets from in ex vivo recirculation experiments from cell culture and blood. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter. 

 

Milestone 2.3.2.1 – Demonstrate the effectiveness of the prototype device in vivo in animals preventing platelet activation or clotting in at least a 2 hour blood pumping experiment at 75 mL/min blood flow. The milestone payment amount was $195,581. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. The prototype device was successfully used in vivo in animals preventing platelet activation or clotting in at least a 2 hour blood pumping experiment at 75 mL/min blood flow. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter.

 

Milestone M4 – Target capture > 50% in 24 hours for at least 5 targets in blood or blood components. The milestone payment was $208,781. Management considers this milestone to be substantive as it was not dependent on the passage of time nor was it based solely on another party's efforts. We demonstrated that we were able to capture > 50% in 24 hours for at least 5 of the agreed targets in blood or blood components. The report was accepted by the contracting officer's representative and the invoice was submitted thereafter. 

 

CORPORATE HISTORY

 

On March 10, 1999, Aethlon, Inc., a California corporation ("Aethlon"), Hemex, Inc., a Delaware corporation ("Hemex"), the accounting predecessor to the Company, and Bishop, Inc. ("Bishop"), a publicly traded "shell" company, completed an Agreement and Plan of Reorganization (the "Plan") structured to result in Bishop's acquisition of all of the outstanding common shares of Aethlon and Hemex (the "Reorganization"). The Reorganization was intended to qualify as a tax-free transaction under Section 368(a)(1)(B) of the 1986 Internal Revenue Code, as amended. Under the Plan's terms, Bishop issued shares of its common stock to the common stock shareholders of Aethlon and Hemex such that Bishop then owned 100% of each company. Upon completion of the transaction, Bishop was renamed Aethlon Medical, Inc.

 

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In October 2009, we established a new wholly owned subsidiary, Exosome Sciences, Inc., a Nevada corporation, as a corporate vehicle for our exosome-related diagnostic activities. In October 2013, our subsidiary, Exosome Sciences, Inc. (ESI), commenced operations with a focus on advancing exosome-based strategies to diagnose and monitor the progression of cancer, infectious disease and other neurological conditions. 

 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 

The cost of research and development, all of which has been charged to operations, amounted to approximately $1,509,000 and $1,440,000 in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. ESI’s research and development activities represented approximately $193,000 of our consolidated research and development expenses in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

 

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

 

We currently own or have license rights to a number of U.S. and foreign patents and patent applications and endeavor to continually improve our intellectual property position. We consider the protection of our technology, whether owned or licensed, to the exclusion of use by others, to be vital to our business. While we intend to focus primarily on patented or patentable technology, we may also rely on trade secrets, unpatented property, know-how, regulatory exclusivity, patent extensions and continuing technological innovation to develop our competitive position. We also own certain trademarks. All of our patent rights and trademarks are owned by Aethlon Medical.

 

U.S. PATENTS

 

We have been exclusively assigned all rights and title to and interest in an invention and related worldwide patent rights for a method to treat cancer under an assignment agreement with the London Health Science Center Research, Inc. (LHSCRI) The invention provides for the "Depression of anticancer immunity through extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles" (including exosomes) for which a patent was allowed by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) in 2012 and patent applications have been filed abroad by us. The agreement provides that we are responsible for paying certain patent application and filing costs as well as a 2% royalty on any future net sales. Under the license agreement, LHSCRI sold and assigned all of its rights, title and interest in the worldwide patents to us.

 

We previously exercised an option to exclusively license a pending patent entitled, "Method to Inhibit Proliferation and Growth of Metastases" from The Trustees of Boston University. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we terminated this license as it was not pertinent to our core business objectives.

 

The following table lists our issued patents and patent applications, including their ownership status:

 

PATENTS ISSUED IN THE UNITED STATES

 

PATENT # PATENT NAME

ISSUANCE

DATE

OWNED OR

LICENSED

8,288,172 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles (exosomes) (method patent) 10/16/12 Owned
7,226,429 Method for removal of viruses from blood by lectin affinity hemodialysis 06/05/07 Owned
6,528,057 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 03/04/03 Licensed

 

PATENT APPLICATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

 

APPLICATION # APPLICATION NAME

FILING

DATE

OWNED OR

LICENSED

11/756543 Method for removal of viruses from blood by lectin affinity hemodialysis 05/31/07 Owned
12/600236 Device and method for purifying virally infected blood 5/12/11 Owned
13/351166 Affinity capture of circulating cancer biomarkers 1/16/12 Owned
12/810295 Method and apparatus for increasing contaminant clearance rates during extracorporeal fluid treatment 09/07/10 Owned
13/623662 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles (medical device and system-based claims) 09/20/12 Owned
13/808561 Methods and compositions for quantifying exosomes 01/04/13 Owned
14/180093 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles 02/13/14 Owned
14/185033 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles 02/20/14 Owned
13/808561 Methods and compositions for quantifying exosomes 08/14/13 Owned
61/946606 Brain specific exosome based diagnostics 2/28/14 Owned
61/947276 Brain specific exosome based diagnostics and extracorporeal therapies 3/3/14 Owned
61/982190 Methods for delivering regional citrate anticoagulation during extracorporeal blood treatments 4/21/14 Owned

 

6
 

 

INTERNATIONAL PATENTS:

 

NON-U.S. PATENTS ISSUED

 

PATENT # PATENT NAME

ISSUANCE

DATE

OWNED OR

LICENSED

2,353,399 Method for removal of viruses from blood by lectin affinity hemodialysis 01/20/04 Owned
770,344 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 06/03/04 Licensed
69929986.1-08 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 02/22/06 Licensed
1,109,564 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 02/22/06 Licensed
1,109,564 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 02/22/06 Licensed
1,109,564 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 02/22/06 Licensed
1,109,564 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 02/22/06 Licensed
2342203 Method for removal of HIV and other viruses from blood 03/01/11 Licensed
EP 1624785 Method for removal of viruses from blood by lectin affinity hemodialysis 07/17/13 Owned

 

NON-U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL PATENT APPLICATIONS (SOME MAY MOVE TO THE US DURING NATIONAL PHASE OF APPLICATION PROCESS)

 

    FILING OWNED OR
APPLICATION # APPLICATION NAME DATE LICENSED
2,516,403 Method for removal of viruses from blood by lectin affinity hemodialysis 01/20/04 Owned
7,752,778.6 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles(exosomes) 03/09/07 Owned
9,104,740.6 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles(exosomes) 03/09/07 Owned
8139/DELNP/2008 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles(exosomes) 03/09/07 Owned
08866242.4 Method and apparatus for increasing contaminant clearance rates during extra corporeal fluid treatment 12/19/08 Owned
2644855 Extracorporeal removal of microvesicular particles 03/09/07 Owned
09815068.3 Methods for reducing viral load of hepatitus c virus in hemodialysis patients 09/15/09 Owned
12100471.4 Methods for reducing viral load of hepatitus c virus in hemodialysis patients 09/15/09 Owned
11804372.8 Methods and compositions for quantifying exosomes 02/06/13 Owned

__________

 

In certain countries, medical devices are not patentable or only recently have become patentable, and enforcement of intellectual property rights in some countries has been limited or non-existent. Future enforcement of patents and proprietary rights in many countries can be expected to be problematic or unpredictable. We cannot guarantee that any patents issued or licensed to us, including within the U.S., will provide us with competitive advantages or will not be challenged by others, or will not expire prior to our successful commercialization of our products. Furthermore, we cannot be certain that others will not independently develop similar products or will not design around patents issued or licensed to us. We cannot guarantee that patents that are issued will not be challenged, invalidated or infringed upon or designed around by others, or that the claims contained in such patents will not infringe the patent claims of others, or provide us with significant protection against competitive products, or otherwise be commercially valuable. We may need to acquire licenses under patents belonging to others for technology potentially useful or necessary to us. If any such licenses are required, we cannot be certain that they will be available on terms acceptable to us, if at all. To the extent that we are unable to obtain patent protection for our products or technology, our business may be materially adversely affected by competitors who develop substantially equivalent technology.

 

TRADEMARKS

 

We have obtained registered trademarks in the United States for the Exosome Sciences®, Hemopurifier®, Aethlon Medical® and Aethlon Medical, Inc. and have adopted the Aethlon ADAPT™ and ELLSA™ trademarks in the United States. We have applied for a trademark on Hemopurifier in India and that application is currently pending.

 

7
 

 

INDUSTRY

 

The industry for treating infectious disease and cancer is extremely competitive, and companies developing new treatment procedures face significant capital and regulatory challenges. Additionally, as the Hemopurifier(R) is a first-in-class device, we have the additional challenge of establishing medical industry support for our technology in the marketplace.

 

COMPETITION

 

We are advancing our Hemopurifier(R) as a treatment strategy to enhance and prolong current drug therapies by removing the viral strains that cause drug resistance. We are also advancing the Hemopurifier as a tool for cancer treatment in conjunction with existing, and to be developed, cancer therapies. The Hemopurifier(R) also may prolong life for infected patients who have become drug resistant or have been infected with a viral pathogen for which there is no drug or vaccine therapy. We believe our Hemopurifier(R) augments the benefit of drug therapies and should not be considered a competitor to such treatments. However, if the industry considered the Hemopurifier(R) to be a potential replacement for drug therapy, or a device that limited the need or volume of existing drug therapies, then the marketplace for the Hemopurifier(R) would be extremely competitive. We believe our Hemopurifier(R) is the sole therapeutic device able to selectively remove viruses and immunosuppressive proteins from circulation. However, we are aware that Asahi Kasei Kurary Medical (Asahi) based in Japan has created a double filtration plasmapheresis system that indiscriminately removes particles from blood in a certain molecule range that includes HCV. Asahi is now marketing this device in Japan as an adjunct therapy for HCV. We may also face competition from producers of antiviral drugs and vaccines.

 

LICENSING AGREEMENTS

 

Effective January 1, 2000, we entered into an agreement with a related party under which an invention and related patent rights for a method of removing HIV and other viruses from the blood using the Hemopurifier(R) were assigned to us by the inventors in exchange for a royalty to be paid on future sales of the patented product or process and shares of our common stock. On March 4, 2003, the related patent was issued and we issued 196,078 shares of restricted common stock to that related party.

 

On February 9, 2006, we entered into an option agreement with the Trustees of Boston University which provides for the right to negotiate an exclusive license for a Boston University patent BU05-41, "Method to Prevent Proliferation and Growth of Metastases." On February 8, 2007 we entered into an amendment to this agreement to extend its term until August 9, 2007. On April 22, 2008, we entered into the actual license agreement for this patent and as the initial payment under this license we issued shares of our common stock equivalent to 115% of $5,000. We terminated this patent license during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 as we determined this license was no longer pertinent to our core business objectives.

 

On November 7, 2006, we entered into an exclusive assignment agreement with the London Health Science Center Research, Inc. and Thomas Ichim under which an invention and related patent rights for a method to treat cancer were assigned to the Company. The invention provides for the "Extracorporeal removal of Microvesicular Particles" for which a patent has been allowed in the United States by the USPTO as of June 2012. The agreement provides that we will pay certain patent application and filing costs as well as a 2% royalty on any future net sales.  Under the license agreement, we own the patents outright.

 

GOVERNMENT REGULATION IN THE U.S.

 

The Hemopurifier(R) is a medical device subject to extensive and rigorous regulation by FDA, as well as other federal and state regulatory bodies in the United States and comparable authorities in other countries. Therefore, we cannot assure that our technology will successfully complete any regulatory clinical trial for any of our proposed applications.

 

Clinical trials are almost always required to support an FDA premarket application. In the United States, these trials generally require submission of an application for an Investigational Device Exemption, or IDE, to the FDA. The IDE application must be supported by appropriate data, such as animal and laboratory testing results, showing that it is safe to test the device in humans and that the testing protocol is scientifically sound. In 2013, the FDA approved our investigational device exemption (IDE) to initiate human clinical studies in the United States as a feasibility study.

 

Under the feasibility study protocol, we will enroll ten end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who are infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) to demonstrate the safety of Hemopurifier therapy. The FDA approved Hemopurifier therapy feasibility study calls for a single-site enrollment of ten HCV-infected end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who have not received any pharmaceutical therapy for their HCV infection for at least 30 days. The protocol consists of a control phase which consists of three consecutive standard dialysis treatments during week one followed by the inclusion of the Hemopurifier during a total of six dialysis sessions conducted during weeks two and three. The rate of adverse events observed during the Hemopurifier therapy phase will be compared to the rate experienced during the control phase. Per-treatment changes of viral load will be observed through quantitative PCR analysis. Additionally, we may also choose to quantitate HCV viral copies captured within the Hemopurifier during each treatment session.

 

8
 

 

On May 19, 2014, we entered into a definitive agreement (the “Agreement”) with Total Renal Research, Inc., (dba DaVita Clinical Research) (“DCR”). Pursuant to the Agreement, DCR will conduct site management administrative services for a study site in connection with the planned clinical safety study of the Aethlon Hemopurifier® in certain patients with Hepatitis-C virus infection. The clinical trial is to be conducted at DaVita MedCenter Dialysis in Houston, Texas, and up to ten patients meeting applicable eligibility requirements will be permitted to enroll in the study. The Principal Investigator for the study will be Dr. Stephen Z. Fadem, who is co-medical director of DaVita MedCenter Dialysis.

 

The Agreement requires us to pay certain expenses related to the study projected to be less than $200,000, including certain start-up and close-out costs, patient compensation and a project management fee to be paid to DCR calculated as five percent of total invoiced patient and site costs. We will also be responsible for the fees for any third-party consulting physicians, including Dr. Fadem, utilized in connection with the study and other pass-through expenses if incurred. The Agreement is effective as of May 16, 2014 and will continue in effect until completion of the services being provided by DCR pursuant to the Agreement.

 

Clinical trials for significant risk devices may not begin until the IDE application is approved by the FDA and the appropriate institutional review boards, or IRBs, at the clinical trial sites. We must reach agreement with the IRB of DaVita MedCenter Dialysis prior to beginning our U.S. clinical trial. We are also required to obtain patients' informed consent that complies with both FDA requirements and state and federal privacy regulations. We, the FDA or the IRB at each site at which a clinical trial is being performed may suspend a clinical trial at any time for various reasons, including a belief that the risks to study subjects outweigh the benefits. Even if a trial is completed, the results of clinical testing may not demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the device, may be equivocal or may otherwise not be sufficient to obtain approval of the product.

 

PERVASIVE AND CONTINUING U.S. REGULATION

 

Should our device be cleared for market use in the United States by the FDA, numerous regulatory requirements continue to apply. These include:

 

  · FDA's Quality System Regulation, or QSR, which requires manufacturers, including third-party manufacturers, to follow stringent design, testing, control, documentation and other quality assurance procedures during all aspects of the manufacturing process;

 

  · labeling regulations and FDA prohibitions against the promotion of products for uncleared, unapproved or off-label uses;

 

  · clearance or approval of product modifications that could significantly affect safety or efficacy or that would constitute a major change in intended use;

 

  · medical device reporting, or MDR, regulations, which require that manufacturers report to the FDA if their device may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or malfunctioned in a way that would likely cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if the malfunction were to recur; and

 

  · post-market surveillance regulations, which apply when necessary to protect the public health or to provide additional safety and effectiveness data for the device.

 

After a device receives a PMA, any modification that could significantly affect its safety or effectiveness, or that would constitute a major change in its intended use, will require a new clearance or approval. The FDA requires each manufacturer to make this determination initially, but FDA can review any such decision and can disagree with a manufacturer's determination.

 

The regulations also require that we report to FDA any incident in which our product may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or in which our product malfunctioned and, if the malfunction were to recur, would likely cause or contribute to death or serious injury.

 

FRAUD AND ABUSE

 

We may also directly or indirectly be subject to various federal and state laws pertaining to healthcare fraud and abuse, including anti-kickback laws. In particular, the federal healthcare program Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits persons from knowingly and willfully soliciting, offering, receiving or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, in exchange for or to induce either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing, arranging for or recommending a good or service, for which payment may be made in whole or part under federal healthcare programs, such as the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Penalties for violations include criminal penalties and civil sanctions such as fines, imprisonment and possible exclusion from Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs. The Anti-Kickback Statute is broad and prohibits many arrangements and practices that are lawful in businesses outside of the healthcare industry. In implementing the statute, the Office of Inspector General ("OIG") has issued a series of regulations, known as the "safe harbors." These safe harbors set forth provisions that, if met, will assure healthcare providers and other parties that they will not be prosecuted under the Anti-Kickback Statute. The failure of a transaction or arrangement to fit precisely within one or more safe harbors does not necessarily mean that it is illegal or that prosecution will be pursued. However, conduct and business arrangements that do not fully satisfy each applicable element of a safe harbor may result in increased scrutiny by government enforcement authorities, such as the OIG.

 

9
 

 

INTERNATIONAL REGULATIONS AND CLINICAL TRIALS

 

International sales of medical devices are subject to foreign governmental regulations, which vary substantially from country to country. The time required to obtain clearance or approval by a foreign country may be longer or shorter than that required for FDA market approval, and the requirements can vary from region to region. At present, we are primarily focused on clinical progression and commercialization of our technologies in the United States.

 

GMP manufacturing of our Hemopurifier® occurs in collaboration with a contract manufacturer based in San Diego, California.  We have registered our contract manufacturing arrangement with the FDA and we have since received an export license from the FDA that allows the export our Hemopurifier® for commercial purposes to India.

 

The primary regulatory environment in Europe is that of the European Union, which has adopted numerous directives and has promulgated voluntary standards regulating the design, manufacture, clinical trials, labeling and adverse event reporting for medical devices. Devices that comply with the requirements of a relevant directive will be entitled to bear a CE conformity marking, indicating that the device conforms with the essential requirements of the applicable directives and, accordingly, can be commercially distributed throughout the member states of the European Union, and other countries that comply with or mirror these directives. The method of assessing conformity varies depending on the type and class of the product, but normally involves a combination of self-assessment by the manufacturer and a third-party assessment by a notified body, an independent and neutral institution appointed by a country to conduct the conformity assessment. This third-party assessment may consist of an audit of the manufacturer's quality system and specific testing of the manufacturer's device. Such an assessment is required in order for a manufacturer to commercially distribute the product throughout these countries. ISO 9001 and ISO 13845 certifications are voluntary harmonized standards. Compliance establishes the presumption of conformity with the essential requirements for a CE Marking. We have not yet initiated clinical trials in the European Union nor do we have a current commitment to conduct such trials as we are primarily focused on clinical progression and commercialization of our technologies in the United States.

 

PRODUCT LIABILITY

 

The risk of product liability claims, product recalls and associated adverse publicity is inherent in the testing, manufacturing, marketing and sale of medical products. We have limited clinical trial liability insurance coverage. There can be no assurance that future insurance coverage will be adequate or available. We may not be able to secure product liability insurance coverage on acceptable terms or at reasonable costs when needed. Any liability for mandatory damages could exceed the amount of our coverage. A successful product liability claim against us could require us to pay a substantial monetary award. Moreover, a product recall could generate substantial negative publicity about our products and business and inhibit or prevent commercialization of other future product candidates.

 

SUBSIDIARIES

 

We have one majority-owned subsidiary, Exosome Sciences, Inc. (“ESI”). ESI’s laboratory operations are in Monmouth Junction, NJ.

 

EMPLOYEES

 

At July 9, 2014, Aethlon had seven full-time employees, comprised of our Chief Executive Officer, our President, our Chief Science Officer, our Chief Financial Officer, two research scientists and an executive assistant. We utilize, whenever appropriate, contract and part-time professionals in order to conserve cash and resources. We currently utilize two corporate communications groups on a part-time basis. We also use several consultants to assist us with certain portions of the work under our DARPA contract.

 

At July 9, 2014, ESI had three full-time employees, comprised of ESI’s Chief Science Officer, Clinical Research Director, a research scientist, and a part-time operations manager.

 

We believe our employee relations are good. None of our employees are represented by a collective bargaining unit.

 

10
 

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our common shares involves a high degree of risk and is subject to many uncertainties. These risks and uncertainties may adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition. In such an event, the trading price for our common shares could decline substantially, and you could lose all or part of your investment. In order to attain an appreciation for these risks and uncertainties, you should read this annual report in its entirety and consider all of the information and advisements contained in this annual report, including the following risk factors and uncertainties.

 

RISKS RELATING TO OUR BUSINESS

 

WE HAVE INCURRED SIGNIFICANT LOSSES AND EXPECT LOSSES TO CONTINUE FOR THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE.

 

We have yet to establish any history of profitable operations. While we began to generate revenues during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012, primarily from our contract with DARPA, our revenues have not been sufficient to cover our cost of operations.   

Future profitability, if any, will require the successful commercialization of our Hemopurifier(R) technology, other products that may emerge from our Aethlon ADAPT™ platform or from additional government contract or grant income. No assurances can be given when or if this will occur or that we will ever be profitable.

 

WE HAVE RECEIVED AN EXPLANATORY PARAGRAPH FROM OUR AUDITORS REGARDING OUR ABILITY TO CONTINUE AS A GOING CONCERN

 

Our independent registered public accounting firm noted in their report accompanying our financial statements for our fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 that we have a significant accumulated deficit, had a working capital deficit, and that a significant amount of additional capital will be necessary to advance the development of our products to the point at which we may become commercially viable. Our independent registered public accounting firm stated that those conditions raised substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Note 1 to our financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2014 describes management's plans to address these matters. We cannot assure you that our business plans will be successful in addressing these issues. This explanatory paragraph about our ability to continue as a going concern could affect our ability to obtain additional financing at favorable terms, if at all, as it may cause investors to lose faith in our long-term prospects. If we cannot successfully continue as a going concern, our shareholders may lose their entire investment.

 

WE WILL REQUIRE ADDITIONAL FINANCING TO SUSTAIN OUR OPERATIONS AND WITHOUT IT WE WILL NOT BE ABLE TO CONTINUE OPERATIONS.

 

Should the financing we require to sustain our working capital needs be unavailable to us on reasonable terms when we require it, if at all, the consequences could be a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition and prospects. If we cannot raise operating capital, we may be forced to cease operations.

 

WE ARE RELIANT UPON LICENSES OF PATENTS AND TECHNOLOGIES FROM THIRD PARTIES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF CERTAIN APPLICATIONS AND USES OF OUR DEVICES; THE TERMINATION OF ANY SUCH LICENSE, OR A CHALLENGE TO THE PATENT AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY UNDERLYING SUCH LICENSE COULD HAVE A MATERIAL AND ADVERSE EFFECT UPON OUR ABILITY TO CONTINUE THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR DEVICES IN CERTAIN FIELDS OF USE, WHICH WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT OUR BUSINESS PROSPECTS AND THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT IN OUR SECURITIES.

 

We rely upon third party licenses for the development of specific uses for our Hemopurifier® devices, including in the area of cancer treatment. Specifically, we are researching, developing and testing cancer-related applications for our devices under a license with the London Health Science Center Research, Inc. and Mr. Thomas Ichim. Should this license be prematurely terminated for any reason, or if the patents and intellectual property owned by such entities that we have licensed should be challenged or defeated by third parties, our research efforts could be materially and adversely affected. There can be no assurances that these licenses will continue in force for as long as we require for our research, development and testing of cancer treatments. There can be no assurances that should this license terminate, or should the underlying patents and intellectual property be challenged or defeated, that suitable replacements can be obtained or developed on terms acceptable to the Company, if at all. There is also the related risk that the Company may not be able to make the required payments under this patent license, in which case the Company may lose one or more of the licensed patents.

 

11
 

 

WE WILL FACE INTENSE COMPETITION FROM COMPANIES THAT HAVE GREATER FINANCIAL, PERSONNEL AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES THAN OURS. THESE COMPETITIVE FORCES MAY IMPACT OUR PROJECTED GROWTH AND ABILITY TO GENERATE REVENUES AND PROFITS, WHICH WOULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON OUR BUSINESS AND THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT.

 

Our competitors are developing vaccine candidates, which could compete with the Hemopurifier(R) medical device candidates we are developing. Our commercial opportunities will be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and market products for any of the diseases we target that:

 

  · are more effective;

 

  · have fewer or less severe adverse side effects;

 

  · are better tolerated;

 

  · are more adaptable to various modes of dosing;

 

  · are easier to administer; or

 

  · are less expensive than the products or product candidates we are developing.

 

Even if we are successful in developing effective Hemopurifier(R) and other Aethlon ADAPT™ based-products, and obtain FDA and other regulatory approvals necessary for commercializing them, our products may not compete effectively with other successful products. Researchers are continually learning more about diseases, which may lead to new technologies for treatment. Our competitors may succeed in developing and marketing products that are either more effective than those that we may develop, alone or with our collaborators, or that are marketed before any products we develop are marketed.

 

The U.S. Congress' passage of the Project BioShield Bill, a comprehensive effort to develop and make available modern, effective drugs and vaccines to protect against attack by biological and chemical weapons or other dangerous pathogens, may encourage competitors to develop their own product candidates. We cannot predict the decisions that will be made in the future by the various government agencies as a result of such legislation.

 

Our competitors include fully integrated pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology companies as well as universities and public and private research institutions. Many of the organizations competing with us have substantially greater capital resources, larger research and development staffs and facilities, greater experience in product development and in obtaining regulatory approvals, and greater marketing capabilities than we do.

 

The market for medical devices is intensely competitive. Many of our potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, more employees, and significantly greater financial, technical, marketing, public relations, and distribution resources than we have. This intense competitive environment may require us to make changes in our products, pricing, licensing, services or marketing to develop, maintain and extend our current technology. Price concessions or the emergence of other pricing or distribution strategies of competitors may diminish our revenues (if any), adversely impact our margins or lead to a reduction in our market share (if any), any of which may harm our business.

 

WE HAVE ISSUED NUMEROUS PROMISSORY NOTES THAT ARE CURRENTLY OVERDUE AND IN DEFAULT; FAILURE TO CURE SUCH DEFAULTS COULD ADVERSELY AFFECT OUR ABILITY TO RAISE NEW CAPITAL AND TO CONTINUE OPERATIONS. 

 

As of July 9, 2014, we have outstanding promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $472,656 which are currently overdue. We have no means to repay the notes unless and until we raise new capital or generate a higher level of revenues.  Although the majority of these notes are convertible into our common stock at various rates and prices, there can be no assurance that the holders of these notes will opt to convert some or all of the principal and interest due and owing on the notes into equity in lieu of cash repayment. Even if such notes are converted to equity, such equity issuances would be dilutive to our shareholders. If we are unable to raise new capital we may be unable to satisfy these note obligations. We may become the subject of multiple litigation claims seeking to recover payment on the notes.  New investors may be reluctant to fund new capital to the Company while these notes are overdue and outstanding. We will attempt to negotiate extensions for the payment and other restructure of the notes as a method of curing the defaults, but there can be no assurance that such extensions or restructures will be on terms favorable to the Company, if at all. If we are unable to satisfy the notes, or restructure them, we may be unable to raise new capital and we may be subject to litigation claims, either of which could cause us to cease operations.

 

12
 

 

WE HAVE LIMITED MANUFACTURING EXPERIENCE.

 

To achieve the levels of production necessary to commercialize our Hemopurifier(R) and other future Aethlon ADAPTTM-based products, we will need to secure manufacturing agreements with contract manufacturers which comply with good manufacturing practice standards and other standards prescribed by various federal, state and local regulatory agencies in the U.S. and any other country of use.

 

We have limited experience manufacturing products for testing purposes and no experience manufacturing products for large scale commercial purposes. In 2010, we established GMP for the manufacture of Hemopurifiers® in an outsourced FDA-approved facility in San Diego, California. To date, we have manufactured devices on a small scale for testing purposes and have begun to utilize the services of that contract manufacturer. There can be no assurance that manufacturing and control problems will not arise as we attempt to commercialize our products or that such manufacturing can be completed in a timely manner or at a commercially reasonable cost. Any failure to address such problems could delay or prevent commercialization of our products and would have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, there can be no assurances that we will be able to adequately finance the manufacture and distribution of our products.

 

OUR AETHLON ADAPTTM TECHNOLOGY MAY BECOME OBSOLETE.

 

Our Aethlon ADAPTTM products may be made unmarketable by new scientific or technological developments where new treatment modalities are introduced that are more efficacious and/or more economical than our Aethlon ADAPTTM products. The Homeland Security industry is growing rapidly with many competitors trying to develop products or vaccines to protect against infectious disease. Any one of our competitors could develop a more effective product which would render our technology obsolete.

 

OUR USE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS, CHEMICALS AND VIRUSES REQUIRES US TO COMPLY WITH REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS AND EXPOSES US TO POTENTIAL LIABILITIES.

 

Our research and development involves the controlled use of hazardous materials, chemicals and viruses. The primary hazardous materials include chemicals needed to construct the Hemopurifier(R) cartridges and the infected plasma samples used in preclinical testing of the Hemopurifier(R). All other chemicals are fully inventoried and reported to the appropriate authorities, such as the fire department, who inspect the facility on a regular basis. We are subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws governing the use, manufacture, storage, handling and disposal of such materials. Although we believe that our safety procedures for the use, manufacture, storage, handling and disposal of such materials comply with the standards prescribed by federal, state, local and foreign regulations, we cannot completely eliminate the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials. We have had no incidents or problems involving hazardous chemicals or biological samples. In the event of such an accident, we could be held liable for significant damages or fines. We currently carry a limited amount of insurance to protect us from these damages. In addition, we may be required to incur significant costs to comply with regulatory requirements in the future.

 

WE ARE DEPENDENT FOR OUR SUCCESS ON A FEW KEY EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. OUR INABILITY TO RETAIN THOSE OFFICERS WOULD IMPEDE OUR BUSINESS PLAN AND GROWTH STRATEGIES, WHICH WOULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON OUR BUSINESS AND THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT.

 

Our success depends to a critical extent on the continued services of our Chief Executive Officer, James A. Joyce, our Chief Science Officer, Richard H. Tullis, and our President, Rodney S. Kenley. Were we to lose one or more of these key executive officers, we would be forced to expend significant time and money in the pursuit of a replacement, which would result in both a delay in the implementation of our business plan and the diversion of limited working capital. The loss of Dr. Tullis would harm the clinical development of our products due to his unique experience with the Aethlon ADAPTTM technology. The loss of Dr. Tullis, Mr. Joyce and/or Mr. Kenley would be detrimental to our growth as they possess unique knowledge of our business model and infectious disease which would be difficult to replace within the biotechnology field. We can give you no assurance that we can find satisfactory replacements for these key executive officers at all, or on terms that are not unduly expensive or burdensome to our company. Although Mr. Joyce and Dr. Tullis have signed employment agreements providing for their continued service to our company, these agreements will not preclude them from leaving our company. We do not currently carry key man life insurance policies on any of our key executive officers which would assist us in recouping our costs in the event of the loss of those officers.

  

OUR INABILITY TO ATTRACT AND RETAIN QUALIFIED PERSONNEL COULD IMPEDE OUR ABILITY TO GENERATE REVENUES AND PROFITS AND TO OTHERWISE IMPLEMENT OUR BUSINESS PLAN AND GROWTH STRATEGIES, WHICH WOULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON OUR BUSINESS AND COULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT.

 

We currently have an extremely small staff comprised of seven full-time employees consisting of our Chief Executive Officer, our President, our Chief Science Officer, our Chief Financial Officer, two research scientists and an executive assistant. We utilize, whenever appropriate, contract and part-time professionals in order to conserve cash and resources. We currently employ two corporate communications groups on a part-time basis.  We also use several consultants to assist us with certain portions of the work under our DARPA contract.

 

13
 

 

At our ESI majority-owned subsidiary, we have three full-time employees, comprised of ESI’s Chief Science Officer, Clinical Research Director, a research scientist, and a part-time operations manager.

 

Although we believe that these employees and consultants will be able to handle most of our additional administrative, research and development and business development in the near term, we will nevertheless be required over the longer-term to hire highly skilled managerial, scientific and administrative personnel to fully implement our business plan and growth strategies. Due to the specialized scientific nature of our business, we are highly dependent upon our ability to attract and retain qualified scientific, technical and managerial personal. Competition for these individuals, especially in San Diego where many biotechnology companies are located, is intense and we may not be able to attract, assimilate or retain additional highly qualified personnel in the future. We cannot assure you that we will be able to engage the services of such qualified personnel at competitive prices or at all, particularly given the risks of employment attributable to our limited financial resources and lack of an established track record.

 

WE PLAN TO GROW RAPIDLY, WHICH WILL PLACE STRAINS ON OUR MANAGEMENT TEAM AND OTHER COMPANY RESOURCES TO BOTH IMPLEMENT MORE SOPHISTICATED MANAGERIAL, OPERATIONAL AND FINANCIAL SYSTEMS, PROCEDURES AND CONTROLS AND TO TRAIN AND MANAGE THE PERSONNEL NECESSARY TO IMPLEMENT THOSE FUNCTIONS. OUR INABILITY TO MANAGE OUR GROWTH COULD IMPEDE OUR ABILITY TO GENERATE A SIGNIFICANT LEVEL OF REVENUES AND PROFITS AND TO OTHERWISE IMPLEMENT OUR BUSINESS PLAN AND GROWTH STRATEGIES, WHICH WOULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON OUR BUSINESS AND THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT.

 

We will need to significantly expand our operations to implement our longer-term business plan and growth strategies. We will also be required to manage multiple relationships with various strategic partners, technology licensors, customers, manufacturers and suppliers, consultants and other third parties. This expansion and these expanded relationships will require us to significantly improve or replace our existing managerial, operational and financial systems, procedures and controls; to improve the coordination between our various corporate functions; and to manage, train, motivate and maintain a growing employee base. The time and costs to effectuate these steps may place a significant strain on our management personnel, systems and resources, particularly given the limited amount of financial resources and skilled employees that may be available at the time. We cannot assure you that we will institute, in a timely manner or at all, the improvements to our managerial, operational and financial systems, procedures and controls necessary to support our anticipated increased levels of operations and to coordinate our various corporate functions, or that we will be able to properly manage, train, motivate and retain our anticipated increased employee base.

 

WE MAY HAVE DIFFICULTY IN ATTRACTING AND RETAINING MANAGEMENT AND OUTSIDE INDEPENDENT MEMBERS TO OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS AS A RESULT OF THEIR CONCERNS RELATING TO THEIR INCREASED PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO LAWSUITS AND SHAREHOLDER CLAIMS BY VIRTUE OF HOLDING THESE POSITIONS IN A PUBLICLY-HELD COMPANY.

 

The directors and management of publicly traded corporations are increasingly concerned with the extent of their personal exposure to lawsuits and shareholder claims, as well as governmental and creditor claims which may be made against them, particularly in view of recent changes in securities laws imposing additional duties, obligations and liabilities on management and directors. Due to these perceived risks, directors and management are also becoming increasingly concerned with the availability of directors and officers liability insurance to pay on a timely basis the costs incurred in defending such claims. We currently do carry limited directors’ and officers’ liability insurance. Directors’ and officers’ liability insurance is expensive and difficult to obtain. If we are unable to continue or provide directors and officers liability insurance at affordable rates or at all, it may become increasingly more difficult to attract and retain qualified outside directors to serve on our Board of Directors. We may lose potential independent board members and management candidates to other companies in the biotechnology field that have greater directors’ and officers’ liability insurance to insure them from liability or to biotechnology companies that have revenues or have received greater funding to date which can offer greater compensation packages. The fees of directors are also rising in response to their increased duties, obligations and liabilities as well as increased exposure to such risks. As a company with a limited operating history and limited resources, we will have a more difficult time attracting and retaining management and outside independent directors than a more established company due to these enhanced duties, obligations and liabilities.

 

OUR INABILITY TO PROTECT OUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS, INCLUDING OUR U.S. AND INTERNATIONAL PATENTS COULD NEGATIVELY IMPACT OUR PROJECTED GROWTH AND ABILITY TO GENERATE REVENUES AND PROFITS, WHICH WOULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON OUR BUSINESS AND THE VALUE OF YOUR INVESTMENT.

 

We rely on a combination of patents, patents pending, copyrights, trademark and trade secret laws, proprietary rights agreements and non-disclosure agreements to protect our intellectual properties. We cannot give you any assurance that these measures will prove to be effective in protecting our intellectual properties. In addition, some of rights in intellectual property that we own or license may expire or be terminated.

 

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In the case of patents, we cannot give you any assurance that our existing patents will not be invalidated, that any patents that we currently or prospectively apply for will be granted, or that any of these patents will ultimately provide significant commercial benefits. Further, competing companies may circumvent any patents that we may hold by developing products which closely emulate but do not infringe our patents. While we intend to seek patent protection for our products in selected foreign countries, those patents may not receive the same degree of protection as they would in the United States. We can give you no assurance that we will be able to successfully defend our patents and proprietary rights in any action we may file for patent infringement. Similarly, we cannot give you any assurance that we will not be required to defend against litigation involving the patents or proprietary rights of others, or that we will be able to obtain licenses for these rights. Legal and accounting costs relating to prosecuting or defending patent infringement litigation may be substantial. We believe that certain patent applications filed and/or other patents issued more recently will help to protect the proprietary nature of the Hemopurifier(R) treatment technology.

 

The Hemopurifier(R) and related treatment approaches are protected by three issued U.S. patents and nine issued international patents. We have also applied for twelve additional U.S. patents and nine additional international patents.

 

We also rely on proprietary designs, technologies, processes and know-how not eligible for patent protection. We cannot give you any assurance that our competitors will not independently develop the same or superior designs, technologies, processes and know-how.

 

While we have and will continue to enter into proprietary rights agreements with our employees and third parties giving us proprietary rights to certain technology developed by those employees or parties while engaged by our company, we can give you no assurance that courts of competent jurisdiction will enforce those agreements.

 

IF WE FAIL TO COMPLY WITH EXTENSIVE REGULATIONS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN REGULATORY AUTHORITIES, THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF OUR PRODUCT CANDIDATES COULD BE PREVENTED OR DELAYED.

 

Our pathogen filtration devices, or Hemopurifier(R) products, are subject to extensive government regulations related to development, testing, manufacturing and commercialization in the U.S. and other countries. The determination of when and whether a product is ready for large-scale purchase and potential use will be made by the U.S. Government through consultation with a number of governmental agencies, including the FDA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Homeland Security. Our product candidates are in the pre-clinical and clinical stages of development and have not received required regulatory approval from the FDA to be commercially marketed and sold. The process of obtaining and complying with FDA and other governmental regulatory approvals and regulations is costly, time consuming, uncertain and subject to unanticipated delays. Such regulatory approval (if any) and product development requires several years. Despite the time and expense exerted, regulatory approval is never guaranteed. We also are subject to the following risks and obligations, among others.

 

  · The FDA may refuse to approve an application if they believe that applicable regulatory criteria are not satisfied.

 

  · The FDA may require additional testing for safety and effectiveness.

 

  · The FDA may interpret data from pre-clinical testing and clinical trials in different ways than we interpret them.

 

  · If regulatory approval of a product is granted, the approval may be limited to specific indications or limited with respect to its distribution.

 

  · The FDA may change their approval policies and/or adopt new regulations.

  

Failure to comply with these or other regulatory requirements of the FDA may subject us to administrative or judicially imposed sanctions, including:

 

  · warning letters;

 

  · civil penalties;

 

  · criminal penalties;

 

  · injunctions;

 

  · product seizure or detention;

 

  · product recalls; and

 

  · total or partial suspension of productions.

 

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DELAYS IN SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETING OUR CLINICAL TRIALS COULD JEOPARDIZE OUR ABILITY TO OBTAIN REGULATORY APPROVAL OR MARKET OUR HEMOPURIFIER(R) PRODUCT CANDIDATES ON A TIMELY BASIS.

 

Our business prospects will depend on our ability to complete clinical trials, obtain satisfactory results, obtain required regulatory approvals and successfully commercialize our Hemopurifier(R) product candidates. Completion of our clinical trials, announcement of results of the trials and our ability to obtain regulatory approvals could be delayed for a variety of reasons, including:

 

  · serious adverse events related to our medical device candidates;

 

  · unsatisfactory results of any clinical trial;

 

  · the failure of our principal third-party investigators to perform our clinical trials on our anticipated schedules; and/or

 

  · different interpretations of our pre-clinical and clinical data, which could initially lead to inconclusive results.

 

Our development costs will increase if we have material delays in any clinical trial or if we need to perform more or larger clinical trials than planned. If the delays are significant, or if any of our Hemopurifier(R) product candidates do not prove to be safe or effective or do not receive required regulatory approvals, our financial results and the commercial prospects for our product candidates will be harmed. Furthermore, our inability to complete our clinical trials in a timely manner could jeopardize our ability to obtain regulatory approval.

 

THE INDEPENDENT CLINICAL INVESTIGATORS THAT WE RELY UPON TO CONDUCT OUR CLINICAL TRIALS MAY NOT BE DILIGENT, CAREFUL OR TIMELY, AND MAY MAKE MISTAKES, IN THE CONDUCT OF OUR CLINICAL TRIALS.

 

We depend on independent clinical investigators to conduct our clinical trials. The investigators are not our employees, and we cannot control the amount or timing of resources that they devote to our product development programs. If independent investigators fail to devote sufficient time and resources to our product development programs, or if their performance is substandard, it may delay FDA approval of our medical device candidates. These independent investigators may also have relationships with other commercial entities, some of which may compete with us. If these independent investigators assist our competitors at our expense, it could harm our competitive position.

 

THE APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MEDICAL PRODUCTS USED TO FIGHT BIOTERRORISM ARE STILL EVOLVING, AND WE CANNOT BE CERTAIN THAT ANY PRODUCTS WE DEVELOP, IF EFFECTIVE, WOULD MEET THESE REQUIREMENTS.

 

We are developing product candidates based upon current governmental policies regulating these medical countermeasure treatments. For instance, we intend to pursue FDA approval of our proprietary pathogen filtration devices to treat infectious agents under requirements published by the FDA that allow the FDA to approve certain medical devices used to reduce or prevent the toxicity of chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear substances based on human clinical data to demonstrate safety and immune response, and evidence of effectiveness derived from appropriate animal studies and any additional supporting data. Our business is subject to substantial risk because these policies may change suddenly and unpredictably and in ways that could impair our ability to obtain regulatory approval of these products, and we cannot guarantee that the FDA will approve our proprietary pathogen filtration devices.

 

OUR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS MAY NOT YIELD MARKETABLE PRODUCTS DUE TO RESULTS OF STUDIES OR TRIALS, FAILURE TO ACHIEVE REGULATORY APPROVALS OR MARKET ACCEPTANCE, PROPRIETARY RIGHTS OF OTHERS OR MANUFACTURING ISSUES.

 

Our success depends on our ability to successfully develop and obtain regulatory approval to market new filtration devices. We expect that a significant portion of the research that we will conduct will involve new and unproven technologies. Development of a product requires substantial technical, financial and human resources even if the product is not successfully completed.

 

Our previously planned products have not become marketable products due in part to our transition in 2001 from a focus on utilizing our Hemopurifier(R) technology on treating harmful metals to treating infectious diseases prior to our having completed the FDA approval process. Our transition was made in order to focus on larger markets with an urgent need for new treatment and to take advantage of the greater sense of urgency surrounding acute and chronic infectious diseases. Prior to initiating the development of infectious disease Hemopurifiers(R), we successfully completed an FDA approved Phase I human safety trial of a Hemopurifier(R) to treat aluminum and iron intoxication. Since changing the focus to infectious disease research, we have not initiated an FDA approved human clinical trial as the development of the technology is still continuing and will require both significant capital and scientific resources. Our pending products face similar challenges of obtaining successful clinical trials in route to gaining FDA approval prior to commercialization. Additionally, our limited financial resources hinder the speed of our product development due to personnel constraints.

 

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Our potential products may appear to be promising at various stages of development yet fail to reach the market for a number of reasons, including the:

 

  · lack of adequate quality or sufficient prevention benefit, or unacceptable safety during pre-clinical studies or clinical trials;

 

  · failure to receive necessary regulatory approvals;

 

  · existence of proprietary rights of third parties; and/or

 

  · inability to develop manufacturing methods that are efficient, cost-effective and capable of meeting stringent regulatory standards.

 

THE PATENTS WE OWN COMPRISE A SIGNIFICANT PERCENTAGE OF OUR ASSETS WHICH COULD LIMIT OUR FINANCIAL VIABILITY.

 

The Hemopurifier(R) and our Aethlon ADAPTTM technology is protected by three issued U.S. patents and nine issued international patents. One of the U.S. patents is covered via an exclusive license. Our exclusive license expires March 2020 and is subject to termination if the inventors have not received a minimum of $15,000 in any year during the term beginning in the second year after the FDA approves the Hemopurifier(R). These patents comprise a significant portion of our assets.

 

LEGISLATIVE ACTIONS AND POTENTIAL NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS ARE LIKELY TO IMPACT OUR FUTURE FINANCIAL POSITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

There have been regulatory changes, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and there may potentially be new accounting pronouncements or additional regulatory rulings which will have an impact on our future financial position and results of operations. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and other rule changes and legislation following the Enron bankruptcy have increased our general and administrative costs as we have incurred increased legal and accounting fees to comply with such rule changes. Further changes in accounting rules and/or legislation changes could materially increase the expenses we report under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and adversely affect our operating results.

 

OUR PRODUCTS ONCE COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE MAY BE SUBJECT TO RECALL OR PRODUCT LIABILITY CLAIMS.

 

Our Hemopurifier(R) products may be used in connection with medical procedures in which it is important that those products function with precision and accuracy. If our products do not function as designed, or are designed improperly, we may be forced by regulatory agencies to withdraw such products from the market. In addition, if medical personnel or their patients suffer injury as a result of any failure of our products to function as designed, or our products are designed inappropriately, we may be subject to lawsuits seeking significant compensatory and punitive damages. The risk of product liability claims, product recalls and associated adverse publicity is inherent in the testing, manufacturing, marketing and sale of medical products. We do not have general clinical trial liability insurance coverage. There can be no assurance that future insurance coverage will to be adequate or available. We may not be able to secure product liability insurance coverage on acceptable terms or at reasonable costs when needed. Any product recall or lawsuit seeking significant monetary damages may have a material effect on our business and financial condition. Any liability for mandatory damages could exceed the amount of our coverage. Moreover, a product recall could generate substantial negative publicity about our products and business and inhibit or prevent commercialization of other future product candidates.

 

POLITICAL OR SOCIAL FACTORS MAY DELAY OR IMPAIR OUR ABILITY TO MARKET OUR PRODUCTS.

 

Products developed to treat diseases caused by or to combat the threat of bioterrorism will be subject to changing political and social environments. The political and social responses to bioterrorism have been highly charged and unpredictable. Political or social pressures may delay or cause resistance to bringing our products to market or limit pricing of our products, which would harm our business. Bioterrorism has become the focus of political debates both in terms of how to approach bioterrorism and the amount of funding the government should provide for any programs involving homeland protection. Government funding for products on bioterrorism could be reduced which would hinder our ability to obtain governmental grants.

 

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RISKS RELATED TO OUR DEPENDENCE ON U.S. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS

 

WE HAVE DERIVED SUBSTANTIALLY ALL OF OUR REVENUE FROM OUR CONTRACT WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. IF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT CHOOSES NOT TO EXERCISE OPTIONS FOR THE FUTURE YEARS UNDER OUR CONTRACT, OUR BUSINESS, FINANCIAL CONDITION AND OPERATING RESULTS COULD BE MATERIALLY HARMED.

 

We have derived and expect for the near future to continue to derive substantially all of our revenue from revenue under our DARPA contract.  If DARPA chooses not to continue our contract in years four and five (commencing October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2016) of the contract, our revenues could be substantially reduced.  In addition, if we are unable to meet any of the DARPA contract milestones to the satisfaction of DARPA, if at all, we may not earn payments under the contract. Any reduction in our revenues, or the termination of the DARPA contract for any reason, could have a material and adverse effect on our business and operations. In addition, DARPA has the right to unilaterally cancel the contract at any time.

 

WE MAY FAIL TO OBTAIN ADDITIONAL GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS TO DEVELOP OUR AETHLON ADAPTTM TECHNOLOGY FOR BIODEFENSE APPLICATIONS.

 

The U.S. Government has undertaken commitments to help secure improved countermeasures against bioterrorism and improved medical treatments for U.S. armed forces. Over the past fiscal year, we were successful in entering in to a subcontract with DARPA.  However, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining additional government grants or contracts.  The process of obtaining government contracts is lengthy with the uncertainty that we will be successful in obtaining announced grants or contracts for therapeutics as a medical device technology. Accordingly, we cannot be certain that we will be awarded any additional U.S. Government grants or contracts utilizing our Hemopurifier(R) platform technology.

 

U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES HAVE SPECIAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS, WHICH CREATE ADDITIONAL RISKS.

 

Our business plan to utilize the Aethlon ADAPT™ system, a medical device platform that converges single or multiple affinity drug agents with advanced plasma membrane technology to create therapeutic filtration devices that selectively remove harmful particles from the entire circulatory system, may involve contracts with the U.S. Government. U.S. Government contracts typically contain unfavorable termination provisions and are subject to audit and modification by the government at its sole discretion, which subjects us to additional risks. These risks include the ability of the U.S. Government to unilaterally:

 

  · suspend or prevent us for a period of time from receiving new contracts or extending existing contracts based on violations or suspected violations of laws or regulations;

 

  · audit and object to our contract-related costs and fees, including allocated indirect costs;

 

  · control and potentially prohibit the export of our products; and

 

  · change certain terms and conditions in our contracts.

 

As a U.S. Government contractor, we are required to comply with applicable laws, regulations and standards relating to our accounting practices and would be subject to periodic audits and reviews. As part of any such audit or review, the U.S. Government may review the adequacy of, and our compliance with, our internal control systems and policies, including those relating to our purchasing, property, estimating, compensation and management information systems. Based on the results of its audits, the U.S. Government may adjust our contract-related costs and fees, including allocated indirect costs. In addition, if an audit or review uncovers any improper or illegal activity, we would possibly be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of our contracts, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspension or prohibition from doing business with the U.S. Government. We could also suffer serious harm to our reputation if allegations of impropriety were made against us. Although we have not had any government audits and reviews to date, future audits and reviews could cause adverse effects. In addition, under U.S. Government purchasing regulations, some of our costs, including most financing costs, amortization of intangible assets, portions of our research and development costs, and some marketing expenses, would possibly not be reimbursable or allowed under such contracts. Further, as a U.S. Government contractor, we would be subject to an increased risk of investigations, criminal prosecution, civil fraud, whistleblower lawsuits and other legal actions and liabilities to which purely private sector companies are not.

 

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OUR BUSINESS MAY BE HARMED AS A RESULT OF THE GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROCESS, WHICH MAY BE A COMPETITIVE BIDDING PROCESS THAT INVOLVES RISKS AND REQUIREMENTS NOT PRESENT IN COMMERCIAL CONTRACTING.

 

We expect that a significant portion of our near-term business will be under government contracts or subcontracts awarded through competitive bidding. Competitive bidding for government contracts presents a number of risks or requirements, some of which are not typically present in the commercial contracting process, including:

 

  · the commitment of substantial time and attention of management and key employees to the preparation of bids and proposals for contracts that may not be awarded to us;

 

  · the need to accurately estimate the resources and cost structure that will be required to perform any contract that we might be awarded;

 

  · the possibility that we may be ineligible to respond to a request for proposal issued by the government;

 

  · the submission by third parties of protests to our responses to requests for proposal that could result in delays or withdrawals of those requests for proposal; and

 

  · if our competitors protest or challenge contract awards made to us pursuant to competitive bidding, the potential that we may incur expenses or delays, and that any such protest or challenge would result in the resubmission of bids based on modified specifications, or in termination, reduction or modification of the awarded contract.

 

The U.S. Government may choose not to award us future contracts for the development of Aethlon ADAPTTM-based products and other biodefense product candidates that we are developing, and may instead award such contracts to our competitors. If we are unable to win particular contracts, we may not be able to operate in the market for products that are provided under those contracts for a number of years.  Additionally, if we are unable to consistently win new contract awards over an extended period, or if we fail to anticipate all of the costs and resources that will be required to secure and, if applicable, perform such contract awards, our growth strategy and our business, financial condition and operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

 

THE SUCCESS OF OUR BUSINESS WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT DEPENDS ON OUR COMPLIANCE WITH REGULATIONS AND OBLIGATIONS UNDER OUR U.S. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS AND VARIOUS FEDERAL STATUTES AND REGULATIONS.

 

Our business with the U.S. Government is subject to specific procurement regulations and a variety of other legal compliance obligations. These laws and rules include those related to:

 

  · procurement integrity;
  · export control;
  · government security;
  · employment practices;
  · protection of the environment;
  · accuracy of records and the recording of costs; and
  · foreign corrupt practices.

 

In addition, before awarding us any future contracts, the U.S. Government could require that we respond satisfactorily to a request to substantiate our commercial viability and industrial capabilities. Compliance with these obligations increases our costs. Failure to comply with these regulations and requirements could lead to suspension or debarment, from government contracting or subcontracting for a period of time. The termination of a government contract or relationship as a result of our failure to satisfy any of these obligations would have a negative impact on our operations and harm our reputation and ability to procure other government contracts in the future.

 

THE PRICING UNDER OUR DARPA CONTRACT IS BASED ON ESTIMATES OF THE TIME, RESOURCES AND EXPENSES REQUIRED TO PERFORM THOSE CONTRACTS. IF OUR ESTIMATES ARE NOT ACCURATE, WE MAY NOT BE ABLE TO EARN AN ADEQUATE RETURN OR MAY INCUR A LOSS UNDER THESE CONTRACTS.

 

Our contract with DARPA is on a firm fixed price basis.  We expect that our future contracts, if any, with the U.S. Government also may be fixed price contracts. Under a fixed price contract, we are required to deliver our products at a fixed price regardless of the actual costs we incur and to absorb any costs in excess of the fixed price. Estimating costs that are related to performance in accordance with contract specifications is difficult, particularly where the period of performance is over several years. Our failure to anticipate technical problems, estimate costs accurately or control costs during performance of a fixed price contract could reduce the profitability of a fixed price contract or cause a loss, which could in turn harm our operating results.

 

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UNFAVORABLE PROVISIONS IN GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS, SOME OF WHICH MAY BE CUSTOMARY, MAY HARM OUR BUSINESS, FINANCIAL CONDITION AND OPERATING RESULTS.

 

Government contracts customarily contain provisions that give the U.S. Government substantial rights and remedies, many of which are not typically found in commercial contracts, including provisions that allow the U.S. Government to:

 

  · terminate existing contracts, in whole or in part, for any reason or no reason;
  · unilaterally reduce or modify contracts or subcontracts, including by imposing equitable price adjustments;
  · cancel multi-year contracts and related orders if funds for contract performance for any subsequent year become unavailable;
  · decline to exercise an option to renew a contract;
  · exercise an option to purchase only the minimum amount, if any, specified in a contract;
  · decline to exercise an option to purchase the maximum amount, if any, specified in a contract;
  · claim rights to products, including intellectual property, developed under the contract;
  · take actions that result in a longer development timeline than expected;
  · direct the course of a development program in a manner not chosen by the government contractor;
  · suspend or debar the contractor from doing business with the government or a specific government agency;
  · pursue criminal or civil remedies under the False Claims Act and False Statements Act; and
  · control or prohibit the export of products.

 

Generally, government contracts contain provisions permitting unilateral termination or modification, in whole or in part, at the U.S. Government’s convenience. Under general principles of government contracting law, if the U.S. government terminates a contract for convenience, the other party to that contract may recover only its incurred or committed costs, settlement expenses and profit on work completed prior to the termination. If the U.S. Government terminates a contract for default, the defaulting company is entitled to recover costs incurred and associated profits on accepted items only and may be liable for excess costs incurred by the government in procuring undelivered items from another source. Our government contract and future contracts could be terminated under these circumstances. Some U.S. Government contracts grant the U.S. Government the right to use, for or on behalf of the U.S. Government, any technologies developed by the contractor under the government contract. If we were to develop technology under a contract with such a provision, we might not be able to prohibit third parties, including our competitors, from using that technology in providing products and services to the U.S. Government.

 

OUR BUSINESS IS SUBJECT TO AUDIT BY THE U.S. GOVERNMENT AND A NEGATIVE AUDIT COULD ADVERSELY AFFECT OUR BUSINESS.

 

U.S. Government agencies such as the Defense Contract Audit Agency, or the DCAA, routinely audit and investigate government contractors. These agencies review a contractor’s performance under its contracts, cost structure and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards. 

 

The DCAA also reviews the adequacy of, and a contractor’s compliance with, its internal control systems and policies, including the contractor’s purchasing, property, estimating, compensation and management information systems. Any costs found to be improperly allocated to a specific contract will not be reimbursed, while such costs already reimbursed must be refunded. If an audit uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including:

 

  · termination of contracts;
  · forfeiture of profits;
  · suspension of payments;
  · fines; and
  · suspension or prohibition from conducting business with the U.S. government.

 

In addition, we could suffer serious reputational harm if allegations of impropriety were made against us.

 

LAWS AND REGULATIONS AFFECTING GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS MAKE IT MORE COSTLY AND DIFFICULT FOR US TO SUCCESSFULLY CONDUCT OUR BUSINESS.

 

We must comply with numerous laws and regulations, including those relating to the formation, administration and performance of government contracts, which can make it more difficult for us to retain our rights under these contracts. These laws and regulations affect how we conduct business with federal, state and local government agencies. Among the most significant government contracting regulations that affect our business are:

 

  · the Federal Acquisition Regulations, and agency-specific regulations supplemental to the Federal Acquisition Regulations, which comprehensively regulate the procurement, formation, administration and performance of government contracts;
  · the business ethics and public integrity obligations, which govern conflicts of interest and the hiring of former government employees, restrict the granting of gratuities and funding of lobbying activities and incorporate other requirements such as the Anti-Kickback Act and the FCPA;
  · export and import control laws and regulations; and
  · laws, regulations and executive orders restricting the use and dissemination of information classified for national security purposes and the exportation of certain products and technical data.

 

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These domestic and foreign laws and regulations affect how we and our customers conduct business and, in some instances, impose additional costs on our business. Any changes in applicable laws and regulations could restrict our ability to maintain our existing contracts and obtain new contracts, which could limit our ability to conduct our business and materially and adversely affect our revenues and results of operations. 

   

AS A U.S. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTOR, WE ARE SUBJECT TO A NUMBER OF PROCUREMENT RULES AND REGULATIONS.

 

Government contractors must also comply with specific procurement regulations and other requirements. These requirements, although customary in government contracts, impact our performance and compliance costs. In addition, current U.S. Government budgetary constraints could lead to changes in the procurement environment, including the DoD’s recent initiative focused on efficiencies, affordability and cost growth and other changes to its procurement practices. If and to the extent such changes occur, they could impact our results of operations and liquidity, and could affect whether and, if so, how we pursue certain opportunities and the terms under which we are able to do so.

 

In addition, failure to comply with these regulations and requirements could result in reductions of the value of contracts, contract modifications or termination, and the assessment of penalties and fines, which could negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. Our failure to comply with these regulations and requirements could also lead to suspension or debarment, for cause, from government contracting or subcontracting for a period of time. Among the causes for debarment are violations of various statutes, including those related to procurement integrity, export control, government security regulations, employment practices, protection of the environment, accuracy of records and the recording of costs, and foreign corruption. The termination of our government contract as a result of any of these acts could have a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition and could have a negative impact on our reputation and ability to procure other government contracts in the future.

 

WE DEPEND ON COMPONENT AVAILABILITY, SUBCONTRACTOR PERFORMANCE AND OUR KEY SUPPLIERS TO MANUFACTURE AND DELIVER OUR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES.

 

We are dependent upon the delivery by suppliers of materials and the assembly by subcontractors of major components and subsystems used in our products in a timely and satisfactory manner and in full compliance with applicable terms and conditions. Some products require relatively scarce raw materials. We are generally subject to specific procurement requirements, which may, in effect, limit the suppliers and subcontractors we may utilize. In some instances, we are dependent on sole-source suppliers. If any of these suppliers or subcontractors fails to meet our needs, we may not have readily available alternatives. In addition, some of our suppliers or subcontractors may be impacted by the recent global financial crisis, which could impair their ability to meet their obligations to us. If we experience a material supplier or subcontractor problem, our ability to satisfactorily and timely complete our clinical trial or delivery obligations could be negatively impacted which could result in reduced sales, termination of contracts and damage to our reputation and relationships with clinical trial providers and if applicable, the US Government. We could also incur additional costs in addressing such a problem. Any of these events could have a negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

RISKS RELATING TO AN INVESTMENT IN OUR SECURITIES

 

TO DATE, WE HAVE NOT PAID ANY CASH DIVIDENDS AND NO CASH DIVIDENDS WILL BE PAID IN THE FORESEEABLE FUTURE.

 

We do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common shares in the foreseeable future, and we cannot assure an investor that funds will be legally available to pay dividends, or that even if the funds are legally available, that the dividends will be paid.

 

THE APPLICATION OF THE "PENNY STOCK" RULES COULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE MARKET PRICE OF OUR COMMON SHARES AND INCREASE YOUR TRANSACTION COSTS TO SELL THOSE SHARES.

 

As long as the trading price of our common shares is below $5 per share, the open-market trading of our common shares will be subject to the "penny stock" rules. The "penny stock" rules impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers who sell securities to persons other than established customers and accredited investors (generally those with assets in excess of $1,000,000 or annual income exceeding $200,000 or $300,000 together with their spouse). For transactions covered by these rules, the broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchase of securities and have received the purchaser's written consent to the transaction before the purchase. Additionally, for any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the broker-dealer must deliver, before the transaction, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must disclose the commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current quotations for the securities. Finally, monthly statements must be sent disclosing recent price information on the limited market in penny stocks. These additional burdens imposed on broker-dealers may restrict the ability or decrease the willingness of broker-dealers to sell our common shares, and may result in decreased liquidity for our common shares and increased transaction costs for sales and purchases of our common shares as compared to other securities.

 

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OUR COMMON SHARES ARE THINLY TRADED, SO YOU MAY BE UNABLE TO SELL AT OR NEAR ASK PRICES OR AT ALL IF YOU NEED TO SELL YOUR SHARES TO RAISE MONEY OR OTHERWISE DESIRE TO LIQUIDATE YOUR SHARES.

 

Our common shares have historically been sporadically or "thinly-traded" on the OTCBB, meaning that the number of persons interested in purchasing our common shares at or near ask prices at any given time may be relatively small or non-existent. This situation is attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk-averse and would be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned and viable. As a consequence, there may be periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non-existent, as compared to a seasoned issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. We cannot give you any assurance that a broader or more active public trading market for our common shares will develop or be sustained, or that current trading levels will be sustained.

 

THE MARKET PRICE FOR OUR COMMON SHARES IS PARTICULARLY VOLATILE GIVEN OUR STATUS AS A RELATIVELY UNKNOWN COMPANY WITH A THINLY-TRADED PUBLIC FLOAT, LIMITED OPERATING HISTORY AND LACK OF STEADY REVENUE WHICH COULD LEAD TO WIDE FLUCTUATIONS IN OUR SHARE PRICE. THE PRICE AT WHICH YOU PURCHASE OUR COMMON SHARES MAY NOT BE INDICATIVE OF THE PRICE THAT WILL PREVAIL IN THE TRADING MARKET. YOU MAY BE UNABLE TO SELL YOUR COMMON SHARES AT OR ABOVE YOUR PURCHASE PRICE, WHICH MAY RESULT IN SUBSTANTIAL LOSSES TO YOU.

 

The market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In fact, during the 52-week period ended March 31, 2014, the high and low closing sale prices of a share of our common stock were $0.27 and $0.08, respectively. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our common shares are sporadically and/or thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by our shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction. The price for our shares could, for example, decline precipitously in the event that a large number of our common shares are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, we are a speculative or "risky" investment due to our limited operating history, limited amount of revenue, lack of profit to date, and the uncertainty of future market acceptance for our potential products. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer. The following factors may add to the volatility in the price of our common shares: actual or anticipated variations in our quarterly or annual operating results; acceptance of our proprietary technology as a viable method of augmenting the immune response of clearing viruses and toxins from human blood; government regulations, announcements of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships or joint ventures; our capital commitments and additions or departures of our key personnel. Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our common shares regardless of our operating performance. We cannot make any predictions or projections as to what the prevailing market price for our common shares will be at any time, including as to whether our common shares will sustain their current market prices, or as to what effect the sale of shares or the availability of common shares for sale at any time will have on the prevailing market price.

 

Shareholders should be aware that, according to SEC Release No. 34-29093, the market for penny stocks has suffered in recent years from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include (1) control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer; (2) manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases; (3) boiler room practices involving high-pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced sales persons; (4) excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differential and markups by selling broker-dealers; and (5) the wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the resulting inevitable collapse of those prices and with consequent investor losses. Our management is aware of the abuses that have occurred historically in the penny stock market. Although we do not expect to be in a position to dictate the behavior of the market or of broker-dealers who participate in the market, management will strive within the confines of practical limitations to prevent the described patterns from being established with respect to our securities. The occurrence of these patterns or practices could increase the volatility of our share price.

 

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VOLATILITY IN OUR COMMON SHARE PRICE MAY SUBJECT US TO SECURITIES LITIGATION.

 

The market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. In the past, plaintiffs have often initiated securities class action litigation against a company following periods of volatility in the market price of its securities. Securities litigation could result in substantial costs and liabilities and could divert management's attention and resources.

  

A DTC “CHILL” ON ELECTRONIC CLEARING OF TRADES IN OUR COMMON STOCK ADVERSELY AFFECTED THE LIQUIDITY OF OUR STOCK AND OUR ABILITY TO RAISE CAPITAL IN PRIOR PERIODS.

 

In September 2011, The Depositary Trust Company (DTC) placed a "chill" on the electronic clearing of trades in our shares which led to some brokerage firms being unwilling to accept certificates and/or electronic deposits of our stock. We have since been successful in lifting the “chill” and our shares now clear electronically making more brokers willing to trade in our common stock. There can be no assurances that that DTC will not again place a chill on our common stock. A chill, if placed on our common stock, would affect the liquidity of our shares which may make it difficult to purchase or sell shares in the open market. It may also have an adverse effect on our ability to raise capital since investors may be unable to resell shares into the market. Our inability to raise capital on terms acceptable to us, if at all, could have a material and adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

OUR OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS BENEFICIALLY OWN OR CONTROL APPROXIMATELY 15% OF OUR OUTSTANDING COMMON SHARES AS OF JULY 9, 2014, WHICH MAY LIMIT YOUR ABILITY OR THAT OF OTHER SHAREHOLDERS, WHETHER ACTING INDIVIDUALLY OR TOGETHER, TO PROPOSE OR DIRECT THE MANAGEMENT OR OVERALL DIRECTION OF OUR COMPANY. ADDITIONALLY, THIS CONCENTRATION OF OWNERSHIP COULD DISCOURAGE OR PREVENT A POTENTIAL TAKEOVER OF OUR COMPANY THAT MIGHT OTHERWISE RESULT IN YOU RECEIVING A PREMIUM OVER THE MARKET PRICE FOR YOUR COMMON SHARES.

 

As of July 9, 2014, our officers and directors beneficially own or control approximately 15% of our outstanding common shares (assuming the exercise of all outstanding options and warrants held by our officers and directors). These persons will have the ability to substantially influence all matters submitted to our shareholders for approval and to control our management and affairs, including extraordinary transactions such as mergers and other changes of corporate control, and going private transactions.

 

A LARGE NUMBER OF COMMON SHARES ARE ISSUABLE UPON EXERCISE OF OUTSTANDING COMMON SHARE PURCHASE OPTIONS, WARRANTS AND CONVERTIBLE PROMISSORY NOTES. THE EXERCISE OR CONVERSION OF THESE SECURITIES COULD RESULT IN THE SUBSTANTIAL DILUTION OF YOUR INVESTMENT IN TERMS OF YOUR PERCENTAGE OWNERSHIP IN THE COMPANY AS WELL AS THE BOOK VALUE OF YOUR COMMON SHARES. THE SALE OF A LARGE AMOUNT OF COMMON SHARES RECEIVED UPON EXERCISE OF THESE OPTIONS OR WARRANTS ON THE PUBLIC MARKET TO FINANCE THE EXERCISE PRICE OR TO PAY ASSOCIATED INCOME TAXES, OR THE PERCEPTION THAT SUCH SALES COULD OCCUR, COULD SUBSTANTIALLY DEPRESS THE PREVAILING MARKET PRICES FOR OUR SHARES.

 

As of March 31, 2014, there are outstanding purchase options and warrants entitling the holders to purchase 96,842,882 common shares at a weighted average exercise price of $0.16 per share. That figure includes 2,441,593 warrants that are conditional upon the exercise of other warrants or conversion of certain convertible debt instruments. There are 46,231,719 shares underlying promissory notes convertible into common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $0.05.

 

Due to a significant note conversion on June 26, 2014, as of July 9, 2014, there are 30,467,144 shares underlying promissory notes convertible into common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $0.05. At July 9, 2014, there are outstanding purchase options and warrants entitling the holders to purchase 103,956,853 common shares.

 

The exercise price for all of the aforesaid warrants may be less than your cost to acquire our common shares. In the event of the exercise of these securities, you could suffer substantial dilution of your investment in terms of your percentage ownership in the company as well as the book value of your common shares. In addition, the holders of the common share purchase options or warrants may sell common shares in tandem with their exercise of those options or warrants to finance that exercise, or may resell the shares purchased in order to cover any income tax liabilities that may arise from their exercise of the options or warrants.

 

OUR ISSUANCE OF ADDITIONAL COMMON SHARES, OR OPTIONS OR WARRANTS TO PURCHASE THOSE SHARES, WOULD DILUTE YOUR PROPORTIONATE OWNERSHIP AND VOTING RIGHTS.

 

We are entitled under our certificate of incorporation to issue up to 500,000,000 shares of common stock. We have reserved for issuance 143,074,602 shares of common stock for existing options, warrants and convertible notes. We have issued and outstanding, as of March 31, 2014, 224,973,980 shares of common stock. As a result, as of March 31, 2014 we had 131,951,418 common shares available for issuance to new investors.

 

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At July 9, 2014, we have reserved for issuance 141,225,399 shares of common stock for existing options, warrants and convertible notes. We have issued and outstanding, as of July 9, 2014, 253,395,651 shares of common stock. As a result, as of July 9, 2014 we had 105,378,950 common shares available for issuance to new investors.  

 

Our Board of Directors may generally issue shares of common stock, or options or warrants to purchase those shares, without further approval by our shareholders based upon such factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant at that time. It is likely that we will be required to issue a large amount of additional securities to raise capital to further our development. It is also likely that we will be required to issue a large amount of additional securities to directors, officers, employees and consultants as compensatory grants in connection with their services, both in the form of stand-alone grants or under our stock plans. We cannot give you any assurance that we will not issue additional shares of common stock, or options or warrants to purchase those shares, under circumstances we may deem appropriate at the time.

 

OUR ISSUANCE OF ADDITIONAL COMMON SHARES IN EXCHANGE FOR SERVICES OR TO REPAY DEBT, WOULD DILUTE YOUR PROPORTIONATE OWNERSHIP AND VOTING RIGHTS AND COULD HAVE A NEGATIVE IMPACT ON THE MARKET PRICE OF OUR COMMON STOCK.

 

Our Board of Directors may generally issue shares of common stock to pay for debt or services, without further approval by our shareholders based upon such factors that our Board of Directors may deem relevant at that time. For the past four years, we issued a total of 71,477,509 shares for debt to reduce our obligations. The average price discount of common stock issued for debt in this period, weighted by the number of shares issued for debt in such period was 43% and 22.8% for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

For the past four fiscal years we issued a total of 11,547,751 shares as payment for services. The average price discount of common stock issued for services during this period, weighted by the number of shares issued was 16.0% and 11.8% for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. It is likely that we will issue additional securities to pay for services and reduce debt in the future. We cannot give you any assurance that we will not issue additional shares of common stock under circumstances we may deem appropriate at the time.

 

THE ELIMINATION OF MONETARY LIABILITY AGAINST OUR DIRECTORS, OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES UNDER OUR CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION AND THE EXISTENCE OF INDEMNIFICATION RIGHTS TO OUR DIRECTORS, OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES MAY RESULT IN SUBSTANTIAL EXPENDITURES BY OUR COMPANY AND MAY DISCOURAGE LAWSUITS AGAINST OUR DIRECTORS, OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES.

 

Our certificate of incorporation contains provisions which eliminate the liability of our directors for monetary damages to our company and shareholders. Our bylaws also require us to indemnify our officers and directors. We may also have contractual indemnification obligations under our agreements with our directors, officers and employees. The foregoing indemnification obligations could result in our company incurring substantial expenditures to cover the cost of settlement or damage awards against directors, officers and employees that we may be unable to recoup. These provisions and resultant costs may also discourage our company from bringing a lawsuit against directors, officers and employees for breaches of their fiduciary duties, and may similarly discourage the filing of derivative litigation by our shareholders against our directors, officers and employees even though such actions, if successful, might otherwise benefit our company and shareholders.

 

ANTI-TAKEOVER PROVISIONS MAY IMPEDE THE ACQUISITION OF OUR COMPANY.

 

Certain provisions of the Nevada General Corporation Law have anti-takeover effects and may inhibit a non-negotiated merger or other business combination. These provisions are intended to encourage any person interested in acquiring us to negotiate with, and to obtain the approval of, our Board of Directors in connection with such a transaction. However, certain of these provisions may discourage a future acquisition of us, including an acquisition in which the shareholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. As a result, shareholders who might desire to participate in such a transaction may not have the opportunity to do so.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

As a Smaller Reporting Company, we are not required to furnish information under this Item 1B.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

We currently rent approximately 2,300 square feet of executive office space at 8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660, San Diego, CA 92122 at the rate of $6,475 per month on a four year lease that expires in September 2014. We also rent approximately 1,700 square feet of laboratory space at 11585 Sorrento Valley Road, Suite 109, San Diego, California 92121 at the rate of $2,917 per month on a two year lease that expires in October 2014.  We are currently searching for new laboratory and office space in the greater San Diego area.

 

Our Exosome Sciences, Inc. subsidiary rents approximately 2,055 square feet of office and laboratory space at 11 Deer Park Drive, South Brunswick, NJ at the rate of $3,425 per month on a one year lease that expires in October 2014. Our current plans are to renew the lease prior to expiration.

 

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ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

We may be involved from time to time in various claims, lawsuits, and/or disputes with third parties or breach of contract actions incidental to the normal course of business operations. We are currently not involved in any such litigation or any pending legal proceedings that we believe could have a material adverse effect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

On February 24, 2014, we entered into a Settlement Agreement and General Release (the “Settlement Agreement”) with Gemini Master Fund, Ltd., a Cayman Islands company ("Gemini"), which, among other things, resulted in the dismissal with prejudice of the complaint filed by Gemini against us on July 5, 2012 in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York, entitled Gemini Master Fund Ltd. v. Aethlon Medical, Inc., Index No. 652358/2012 (the "Complaint").

 

In the Complaint, Gemini sought relief both in the form of money damages and delivery of shares of our common stock. The Complaint alleged, among other things, that we were in default of a convertible promissory note ("Convertible Note") originally issued to Gemini on February 12, 2010 by failing to pay the Convertible Note in full and by failing to honor certain requests by Gemini to convert the principal and interest under the Convertible Note into shares of our common stock. The Complaint also alleged that we failed to issue shares upon the presentation of exercise notices under warrants originally issued to Gemini in 2009 and 2010 (respectively, the "2009 Warrant" and the "2010 Warrant").

 

In the Complaint, Gemini alleged it was entitled to 22,389,382 shares of common stock upon conversion of the balance of the Convertible Note and Gemini alleged that it was entitled to receive 30,370,814 shares of common stock pursuant to the 2009 Warrant and the 2010 Warrant, for a combined sum of 52,760,196 common shares.

 

In response, we provided documentation that the Convertible Note had been paid in full in cash and accepted by Gemini prior to the filing of the Complaint. In addition, we had maintained on our books the total number of shares required to be issued under the 2009 Warrant, the 2010 Warrant and the 2008 Warrant (defined below) combined was 6,359,999 shares.

 

The Settlement Agreement required us to issue a total of 7,522,854 shares of common stock into an escrow and those shares were to be released to Gemini ratably over a ten-month period. The shares were issued upon partial exercise of the 2009 Warrant and 2010 Warrant as well as under a third warrant, issued by us to Gemini in 2008 (the "2008 Warrant"). No shares were issued as consideration for the alleged default under the Convertible Note or in consideration of the releases granted in the Settlement Agreement. In addition, our insurance company agreed to pay Gemini $150,000. Upon the completion of the share issuances, the 2008 Warrant, the 2009 Warrant and the 2010 Warrants were canceled. In addition, under the Settlement Agreement, the Convertible Note (and any other agreement to pay Gemini or issue stock or anything else of value to Gemini) was extinguished and fully satisfied.

 

As we previously had 6,359,999 shares of common stock reserved for issuance under the three Warrants described above, the settlement increased our fully diluted shares outstanding by 1,162,855 shares.

 

Following the performance of the settlement terms described above, a Stipulation of Dismissal was filed with the Court, permanently terminating the litigation. The Settlement Agreement also provided for mutual and full releases of all other claims between Gemini and us.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

We have no disclosure applicable to this item.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Our Common Stock is quoted on the Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board (OTCBB).  Our trading symbol is "AEMD."

 

Our Common Stock has had a limited and sporadic trading history.

 

The following table sets forth for the calendar period indicated the quarterly high and low bid prices for our Common Stock as reported by the OTCBB. The prices represent quotations between dealers, without adjustment for retail markup, mark down or commission, and do not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

    BID PRICE  
PERIOD   HIGH     LOW  
             
Calendar 2014:            
First Quarter   $ 0.27     $ 0.16  
                 
Calendar 2013:                
Fourth Quarter     0.18       0.13  
Third Quarter     0.29       0.10  
Second Quarter     0.14       0.08  
First Quarter     0.15       0.06  
                 
Calendar 2012:                
Fourth Quarter     0.11       0.06  
Third Quarter     0.11       0.06  
Second Quarter     0.13       0.07  
First Quarter     0.18       0.05  

 

There were approximately 216 record holders of our common stock at July 9, 2014. The number of registered shareholders includes any beneficial owners of common shares held in street name.

 

We have not declared any cash dividends on our common stock since inception and do not anticipate any in the future. Our current business plan is to retain any future earnings to finance the expansion and development of our business. Any future determination to pay cash dividends will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors, and will be dependent upon our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements and other factors our board may deem relevant at that time.

 

The transfer agent and registrar for our common stock is Computershare Investor Services, located at 350 Indiana Street, Suite 800, Golden, Colorado 80401.

 

RECENT SALES OF UNREGISTERED SECURITIES

 

We have sold or issued the following securities not registered under the Securities Act in reliance upon the exemption from registration pursuant to Section 4(2) of the Securities Act or Regulation D of the Securities Act during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. Except as stated below, no underwriting discounts or commissions were payable with respect to any of the following transactions.

 

COMMON STOCK AND WARRANTS

 

Aethlon Medical, Inc. Equity Transactions in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014

 

Common Stock Issuances in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014:

 

In June 2013, we completed a unit subscription agreement with three accredited investors pursuant to which we issued 1,580,248 shares of our common stock and 790,124 warrants to purchase our common stock for net cash proceeds of $128,000. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.121 per share.

 

In June 2013, we issued to our CEO the remaining 3,400,000 shares under his restricted share grant, all of which were vested.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2013, we issued 3,675,278 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of three notes issued by the Company in exchange for the partial conversion of principal and interest in an aggregate amount of $246,500 at an average conversion price of $0.07 per share.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2013, we issued 222,734 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.10 per share in payment for legal services valued at $21,750 based on the value of the services provided.

 

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In August 2013, we completed a unit subscription agreement with four accredited investors pursuant to which we issued 900,901 shares of our common stock and 450,451 warrants to purchase our common stock in exchange for net cash proceeds of $100,000. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.167 per share.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 933,522 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.14 per share in payment for legal and scientific consulting services valued at $127,593 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 1,168,343 shares of restricted common stock at an average price of $0.10 per share in payment for investor relations and public relations services valued at $115,000 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended September 30 2013, we issued 2,795,367 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of four notes issued by the Company in exchange for the partial or full conversion of principal and interest in an aggregate amount of $173,960 at an average conversion price of $0.06 per share.

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2013, we entered into a unit purchase agreement and subscription agreements with 32 accredited investors pursuant to which we issued 14,367,200 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase our common stock for gross cash proceeds of $1,795,900. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.22 per share. We paid the FINRA registered-broker that was engaged as placement agent in the transaction an aggregate cash fee in the amount of $270,508 and will issue the placement agent or its designees warrants to purchase an aggregate of 2,155,080 shares of our common stock. We also paid $78,360 in other costs and fees, including legal fees, blue sky fees and escrow costs. The net proceeds that we received totaled $1,447,032.

 

During the three months ended December 31 2013, we issued 1,465,200 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of two notes issued by us in exchange for the partial or full conversion of accrued interest in an aggregate amount of $80,000 at an average conversion price of $0.05 per share.

 

During the three months ended March 31 2014, we issued 2,638,179 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of five notes issued by us in exchange for the partial or full conversion of accrued interest in an aggregate amount of $226,316 at an average conversion price of $0.09 per share.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, we issued 346,770 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.19 per share in payment for legal services valued at $65,250 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, we issued 399,781 shares of restricted common stock at an average price of $0.16 per share in payment for investor relations and public relations services valued at $62,500 based on the value of the services provided.

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into extension agreements with three noteholders. In conjunction with the extension agreements, we agreed to issue to the noteholders an aggregate 4,507,105 shares of restricted common stock as a result of the noteholders invoking the antidilution protection on their notes.

 

Exosome Sciences, Inc. Equity Transactions in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014 

 

On November 21, 2013, ESI, a wholly owned diagnostic subsidiary of ours, entered into a stock purchase agreement with twelve accredited investors pursuant to which such investors purchased an aggregate of 220,000 shares of ESI’s common stock at a purchase price of $5.00 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $1,100,000 in cash. 

 

On December 13, 2013, ESI entered into a second stock purchase agreement with three accredited investors , pursuant to which such investors purchased an aggregate of 80,000 shares of ESI’s common stock at a purchase price of $5.00 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $400,000 in cash.

 

The aggregate gross proceeds received by ESI under these two transactions above were $1,500,000. As a result of these transactions the Company’s percentage ownership of the outstanding common stock of ESI was reduced from 100% to 80%.

 

One of the investors was Dr. Chetan Shah, a director of the Company. Dr. Shah purchased 70,000 ESI shares for an aggregate purchase price of $350,000.

 

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Warrant-Related Issuances in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014:

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, 18 warrant holders exercised 6,581,259 warrants to receive 3,407,468 restricted shares of common stock in cashless exercise transactions.

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2013, a warrant holder exercised 2,805,000 warrants in exchange for 1,577,736 shares in a cashless exercise transaction.

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2013, we issued an aggregate 9,338,680 five year warrants to the investors and placement agent as part of our financing in that period (see above). The exercise price for the warrants was $0.22 per share.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, four warrant holders exercised 7,731,021 warrants in cashless exercise transactions

 

In February 2014, we issued 7,522,854 shares of restricted common stock upon the cashless exercise of three warrants in connection with the Gemini litigation settlement.

 

Stock Option-Related Issuances in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014:

 

In May 2013, we issued to a scientific advisory board member and a scientific consultant a three year option to purchase 125,000 shares of our common stock at a price of $0.11 per share.

 

In July 2013, our compensation committee and Board of Directors approved the issuance of four stock option grants to four of our executives. The options carried an exercise price of $0.10 per share, have a ten year life and vest over the following schedule: 25% on July 1, 2014, 25% on July 1, 2015, 25% on July 1, 2016 and 25% on July 1, 2017. The numbers of shares underlying each of the stock option grants were as follows: 2,000,000 shares to our chief executive officer and 500,000 shares each to our president, chief science officer and chief financial officer.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, a former director exercised 182,927 in vested stock options through the contribution of $2,000 in cash and $13,000 in accrued expenses owed to him based on the exercise price of $0.082 per share.

 

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLANS

 

SUMMARY EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN DATA

 

The following table sets forth March 31, 2014 information on our equity compensation plans (including the potential effect of debt instruments convertible into common stock) in effect as of that date:

 

Plan category   (a)
Number of securities
to be issued
upon exercise
of outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
(1)(2)
    (b)
Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
    (c)
Number of securities
remaining available
for future issuance
under equity
compensation plans
(excluding securities
reflected in column
(a))
 
                         
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders         $       490,000  
                         
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders (1)(3)(4)     26,133,407     $ 0.25       2,445,626  
                         
Totals     26,133,407       0.25       2,935,626  

 

(1) The description of the material terms of non-plan issuances of equity instruments is discussed in Note 6 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

(2) Net of equity instruments forfeited, exercised or expired.

 

(3) On June 8, 2009, our Board of Directors approved the grant to Mr. James A. Joyce, our Chief Executive Officer, of 4,000,000 shares of restricted common stock. The market price of our stock on the grant date was $0.24 per share and the shares vested in equal installments over a thirty-six-month period that commenced on June 30, 2010. 600,000 of such shares were pledged as collateral for a loan and have been retained and/or sold by the lender and are no longer owned by Mr. Joyce.

 

(4) On March 31, 2014 we had 2,445,626 shares available under our 2010 Stock Incentive Plan.

 

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2000 STOCK OPTION PLAN

 

Our 2000 Stock Option Plan (the "Plan"), adopted by us in August 2000, provides for the grant of Incentive Stock Options ("ISOs") to our full-time employees (who may also be directors) and Nonstatutory Stock Options ("NSOs") to non-employee directors, consultants, customers, vendors or providers of significant services. The exercise price of any ISO may not be less than the fair market value of the Common Stock on the date of grant or, in the case of an optionee who owns more than 10% of the total combined voting power of all classes of our outstanding stock, not be less than 110% of the fair market value on the date of grant. The exercise price, in the case of any NSO, must not be less than 75% of the fair market value of the Common Stock on the date of grant. The amount reserved under the Plan is 500,000 options.

 

At March 31, 2014, all of the grants previously made under the Plan had expired and 10,000 restricted shares had been issued under the Plan, with 490,000 available for future issuance.

 

2003 CONSULTANT STOCK PLAN

 

Our 2003 Consultant Stock Plan, as amended from time to time (the "Stock Plan"), adopted by us in August 2003, advances our interests by helping us obtain and retain the services of persons providing consulting services upon whose judgment, initiative, efforts and/or services we are substantially dependent, by offering to or providing those persons with incentives or inducements affording such persons an opportunity to become owners of our capital stock. Consultants or advisors are eligible to receive grants under the plan program only if they are natural persons providing bona fide consulting services to us, with the exception of any services they may render in connection with the offer and sale of our securities in a capital-raising transaction, or which may directly or indirectly promote or maintain a market for our securities. The Stock Plan provides for the grant of common stock. No awards may be issued after the ten-year anniversary of the date we adopted the Stock Plan, the termination date for the plan. We have periodically amended the Stock Plan to increase the number of shares available for issuance under the Stock Plan with the approval of our Board of Directors.

 

On March 29, 2004, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 1,000,000 common shares issuable under the Stock Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

On August 29, 2005, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 2,000,000 common shares issuable under the Stock Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

On August 9, 2007, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 2,000,000 common shares issuable under the Stock Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

On July 10, 2009, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 1,000,000 common shares issuable under the Stock Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

On February 17, 2010, we filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 1,500,000 common shares issuable under the Stock Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

We discontinued using this Stock Plan in October 2012.

 

2010 STOCK INCENTIVE PLAN

 

In August 2010, we adopted the 2010 Stock Incentive Plan (the "Incentive Plan"), which provides incentives to attract, retain and motivate employees and directors whose present and potential contributions are important to the success of the Company by offering them an opportunity to participate in our future performance through awards of options, the right to purchase common stock, stock bonuses and stock appreciation rights and other awards. A total of 3,500,000 common shares were initially reserved for issuance under the Incentive Plan.

 

In August 2010, we filed a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 3,500,000 common shares issuable under the Incentive Plan under the Securities Act of 1933 and in July 2012, we filed a registration statement on Form S-8 for the purpose of registering 5,000,000 common shares issuable under the Incentive Plan under the Securities Act of 1933.

 

At March 31, 2014, we had 2,445,626 shares available under the Incentive Plan.

 

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2012 DIRECTORS COMPENSATION PROGRAM

 

In July 2012, our Board of Directors approved a new Board Compensation Program (the “New Program” or the “2012 Program”), which modifies and supersedes the 2005 Directors Compensation Program (the “2005 Program”) that was previously in effect. Under the New Program, in which only non-employee Directors may participate, an eligible Director will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of ten year options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. In addition, under the New Program eligible Directors will receive cash compensation equal to $500 for each committee meeting attended and $1,000 for each formal Board meeting attended.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our four outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,667,105 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.076 per share.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our five outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,595,536 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.082 per share.

 

At March 31, 2014 under the 2005 Directors Compensation Program we had issued 1,337,825 options to outside directors and 3,965,450 options to employee-directors, 514,550 outside directors’ options had been forfeited, 250,000 outside directors’ options had been exercised and 3,671,550 options remained outstanding.

 

On June 6, 2014, our Board of Directors approved certain changes to the New Program. Under the modified New Program, a new eligible Director will receive an initial grant of $50,000 worth of options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. These options will have a term of ten years and will vest 1/3 upon grant and 1/3 upon each of the first two anniversaries of the date of grant. In addition, at the beginning of each fiscal year, each existing Director eligible to participate in the modified New Program also will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of options valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. Such options will vest on the first anniversary of the date of grant. In lieu of per meeting fees, under the modified New Program eligible Directors will receive an annual Board retainer fee of $30,000. The modified New Program also provides for the following annual retainer fees: Audit Committee Chair - $5,000, Compensation Committee chair - $5,000, Audit Committee member - $4,000, Compensation Committee member - $4,000 and Lead independent director - $15,000.

 

STAND-ALONE GRANTS

 

From time to time our Board of Directors grants restricted stock or common share purchase options or warrants to selected directors, officers, employees and consultants as equity compensation to such persons on a stand-alone basis outside of any of our formal stock plans. The terms of these grants are individually negotiated.

 

On June 8, 2009, our Board of Directors approved the grant to Mr. Joyce of 4,000,000 shares of restricted common stock at a price per share of $0.24, the vesting and issuance of which occurred in equal installments over a thirty-six-month period that commenced on June 30, 2010. Mr. Joyce has accepted all 4,000,000 shares of the grant. However, 600,000 shares previously accepted by Mr. Joyce were pledged as collateral for a loan and have been retained and/or sold by the lender and are no longer owned by Mr. Joyce.

 

As of March 31, 2014, we have issued 22,568,158 options (of which 3,368,942 have been exercised or cancelled) and authorized the issuance of 4,000,000 shares of restricted stock outside of the 2005 Directors Compensation Plan, the 2012 Directors Compensation Plan, the 2000 Stock Option Plan, the 2003 Consultant Stock Plan and the 2010 Incentive Stock Plan.

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

As a Smaller Reporting Company, we are not required to furnish information under this Item 6.

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this report.

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

In this document we make a number of statements, referred to as "FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), that are intended to convey our expectations or predictions regarding the occurrence of possible future events or the existence of trends and factors that may impact our future plans and operating results. The safe harbor for forward-looking statements provided by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 does not apply to us. We note, however, that these forward-looking statements are derived, in part, from various assumptions and analyses we have made in the context of our current business plan and information currently available to us and in light of our experience and perceptions of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments and other factors we believe to be appropriate in the circumstances. You can generally identify forward-looking statements through words and phrases such as "SEEK", "ANTICIPATE", "BELIEVE", "ESTIMATE", "EXPECT", "INTEND", "PLAN", "BUDGET", "PROJECT", "MAY BE", "MAY CONTINUE", "MAY LIKELY RESULT", and similar expressions. When reading any forward looking-statement you should remain mindful that all forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain as they are based on current expectations and assumptions concerning future events or future performance of our company, and that actual results or developments may vary substantially from those expected as expressed in or implied by that statement for a number of reasons or factors, including those relating to:

 

  · whether or not the U.S. Government exercises the options for years four and five of our DARPA contract;

 

  · whether or not markets for our products develop and, if they do develop, the pace at which they develop;

 

  · our ability to attract and retain the qualified personnel to implement our growth strategies;

 

  · our ability to obtain approval from the Food and Drug Administration for our products;

 

  · our ability to protect the patents on our proprietary technology;

 

  · our ability to fund our short-term and long-term operating needs;

 

  · changes in our business plan and corporate strategies; and

 

  · other risks and uncertainties discussed in greater detail in the sections of this document, including those captioned "RISK FACTORS" and "MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

  

Each forward-looking statement should be read in context with, and with an understanding of, the various other disclosures concerning our company and our business made elsewhere in this document as well as other public reports filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC"). You should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement as a prediction of actual results or developments. We are not obligated to update or revise any forward-looking statement contained in this document to reflect new events or circumstances unless and to the extent required by applicable law.

 

Overview

 

Aethlon Medical, Inc. ("Aethlon", the "Company", "we" or "us") is a medical device company focused on creating innovative devices that address unmet medical needs in cancer, infectious disease and other life-threatening conditions. At the core of our developments is the Aethlon ADAPT™ (Adaptive Dialysis-Like Affinity Platform Technology) system, a medical device platform that converges single or multiple affinity drug agents with advanced plasma membrane technology to create therapeutic filtration devices that selectively remove harmful particles from the entire circulatory system without loss of essential blood components.

 

In June 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") approved our Investigational Device Exemption ("IDE") application to initiate a ten patient human clinical trial in one location in the United States. Successful outcomes of that human trial as well as at least one follow-on human trial will be required by the FDA in order to commercialize our products in the US. The regulatory agencies of certain foreign countries where we intend to sell this device will also require one or more human clinical trials.

 

Some of our patents may expire before we receive FDA approval to market our products in the United States or we receive approval to market our products in a foreign country. However, we believe that certain patent applications and/or other patents issued more recently will help protect the proprietary nature of the Hemopurifier(R) treatment technology.

 

In October 2013, our subsidiary, Exosome Sciences, Inc. (ESI), commenced operations with a focus on advancing exosome-based strategies to diagnose and monitor the progression of cancer, infectious disease and other life-threatening conditions.

 

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Results of Operations

 

Revenues

 

We recorded government contract revenue in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.  This revenue arose from work performed under our government contract with DARPA and our subcontract with Battelle as follows:

 

   Fiscal Year Ended 3/31/14   Fiscal year Ended 3/31/13   Change in Dollars 
DARPA Contract  $1,466,482   $1,230,004   $236,478 
Battelle Subcontract   157,287        157,287 
Total Government Contract Revenue  $1,623,769   $1,230,004   $393,765 

 

DARPA Contract

 

We entered into a contract with the DARPA on September 30, 2011. Under the DARPA award, we have been engaged to develop a therapeutic device to reduce the incidence of sepsis, a fatal bloodstream infection that often results in the death of combat-injured soldiers. The award from DARPA was a fixed-price contract with potential total payments to us of $6,794,389 over the course of five years. Fixed price contracts require the achievement of multiple, incremental milestones to receive the full award during each year of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, we will perform certain incremental work towards the achievement of specific milestones against which we will invoice the government for fixed payment amounts.

 

Originally, only the base year (year one contract) was effective for the parties, however, DARPA subsequently exercised the option on the second and third years of the contract. DARPA has the option to enter into the contract for years four and five. The milestones are comprised of planning, engineering and clinical targets, the achievement of which in some cases will require the participation and contribution of third party participants under the contract. There can be no assurance that we alone, or with third party participants, will meet such milestones to the satisfaction of the government and in compliance with the terms of the contract or that we will be paid the full amount of the contract revenues during any year of the contract term. We commenced work under the contract in October 2011.

 

Due to budget restrictions within the Department of Defense, on February 10, 2014, DARPA reduced the scope of our contract in years three through five of the contract. The reduction in scope focused our research on exosomes, viruses and blood processing instrumentation. This scope reduction will reduce the possible payments under the contract by $858,491 over years three through five. We recently completed a rebudgeting of the expected costs on the remaining years of the DARPA contract based on the reduced milestones and have concluded that the reductions in our costs due to the scaled back level of work will almost entirely offset the anticipated revenue levels based on current assumptions.

 

As a result of achieving eight milestones in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we reported $1,466,482 in contract revenue for that fiscal year and as a result of achieving six milestones in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, we reported $1,230,004 in contract revenue for that fiscal year.

 

As of March 31, 2014, we have invoiced for twenty milestone payments under the DARPA contract totaling $4,054,675.

 

Battelle Subcontract

 

We entered into a subcontract agreement with Battelle Memorial Institute (“Battelle”) in March 2013. Battelle was chosen by DARPA to be the prime contractor on the systems integration portion of the original DARPA contract and we are one of several subcontractors on that systems integration project. The Battelle subcontract is under a time and materials basis and we began generating revenues under the subcontract in the three months ended September 30, 2013. Our expected future revenue from the subcontract will be at the discretion of Battelle. The Battelle subcontract is our first cost-reimbursable contract.

 

Our revenue under this contract is a function of cost reimbursement plus an overhead mark-up for hours devoted to the project by specific employees (with specific hourly rates for those employees), for travel expenses related to the project, for any equipment purchased for the project and for the cost of any consultants hired by us to perform work on the project. Each payment will require approval by the program manager at Battelle.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Consolidated operating expenses were $4,679,697 for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 compared to $4,805,358 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, a decrease of $125,661 or 2.6%. The net decrease of $125,661 was due to a decrease in professional fees of $370,873, which was partially offset by an increase in general and administrative expense of $185,007 and an increase in payroll and related expenses of $60,205.

 

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The $370,873 decrease in our professional fees primarily arose from a decrease in DARPA-related professional fees of $223,930 due to decreased use of consultants on subtask 1 of the project and a decrease in non-DARPA-related professional fees of $187,922. Those decreases were partially offset by $40,979 in professional fees at our ESI subsidiary. The decrease in non-DARPA-related professional fees was primarily due to decreased activity in our hepatitis C trial in India.

 

The $185,007 increase in general and administrative expenses primarily arose from $130,367 in general and administrative expenses from the recently launched operations at our new majority-owned ESI subsidiary. We also had a $65,862 increase in general and administrative expenses related to our government contracts, which was partially offset by a $11,222 decrease in our non-ESI non-DARPA related general and administrative expenses. 

 

The $60,205 increase in payroll and related expenses was principally driven by $232,719 in payroll and related expenses from the recently launched operations at our new majority-owned ESI subsidiary. That increase was partially offset by a $157,327 reduction in our stock-based compensation.

 

Other Expenses

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we recognized other expenses of $10,383,034 compared to $1,316,686 of other expense in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013. The following table breaks out the various components of our other expense over the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

   Components of Other Expense
in Fiscal Year Ended
 
   March 31,
2014
   March 31,
2013
   Change 
             
LOSS ON DEBT CONVERSION AND ON SETTLEMENT OF ACCRUED INTEREST AND DAMAGES  $40,257   $139,839   $(99,582)
                
CHANGE IN FAIR VALUE OF DERIVATIVE LIABILITY   8,547,015    44,705    8,502,310 
                
INTEREST AND OTHER DEBT EXPENSES   1,287,221    1,132,314    154,907 
                
LOSS ON LITIGATION SETTLEMENT   583,601        583,601 
                
OTHER   (75,060)   (172)   (74,888)
                
TOTAL OTHER EXPENSE  $10,383,034   $1,316,686   $9,066,348 

 

We recorded a loss on debt conversion and on settlement of accrued interest and damages of $40,257 and $139,839 in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  In the both fiscal years, those losses arose from the conversion to equity of principal and accrued interest on certain notes payable.

 

Both periods include changes in the fair value of derivative liability. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, the change in the estimated fair value of derivative liability was a loss of $8,547,015 and for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, the change in the estimated fair value of derivative liability was a loss of $44,705.

 

We also recorded litigation settlement expense of $583,601 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

 

Other income included a gain of $75,000 related to the extinguishment of accrued damages as a result of the litigation settlement in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 as well as interest income in both fiscal years.

 

Our interest and other debt expense increased by $154,907 from the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 to the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. The following table breaks out the various components of our interest expense over the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

   Components of Interest Expense and Other Debt
Expenses in Fiscal Year Ended
 
   March 31,
2014
   March 31,
2013
   Change 
             
INTEREST EXPENSE  $425,725   $526,110   $(100,385)
                
AMORTIZATION OF DEFERRED FINANCING COSTS   863    127,200    (126,337)
                
AMORTIZATION OF NOTE DISCOUNTS   4,284    467,158    (462,874)
                
NOTE RESTRUCTURING EXPENSE   856,349        856,349 
                
NON CASH INTEREST EXPENSE       11,846    (11,846)
                
TOTAL INTEREST EXPENSE  $1,287,221   $1,132,314   $154,907 

 

As a result of the above factors, our net loss before noncontrolling interests increased from $(4,892,040) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 to $(13,438,962) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

At March 31, 2014, we had a cash balance of $1,250,279 and a working capital deficit of $14,169,471. This compares to a cash balance of $125,274 and a working capital deficit of $9,276,618 at March 31, 2013. Between April 1, 2014 and July 9, 2014, we raised aggregate proceeds of $320,800 through private equity transactions and collected $135,376 under our DARPA contract and Battelle subcontract. Our cash at March 31, 2014 plus additional funds raised to date subsequent to March 31, 2014 are not sufficient to meet our funding requirements during the next twelve months. Significant additional financing must be obtained in order to provide a sufficient source of operating capital and to allow the Company to continue to operate as a going concern. In addition, we will need to raise capital to complete the recently approved human clinical trial in the U.S.

 

We do not expect revenue from operations will be sufficient to satisfy our funding requirements in the near term, and accordingly, our ability to continue operations and meet our cash obligations as they become due and payable is expected to depend for at least the next several years on our ability to sell securities, borrow funds or a combination thereof. Future capital requirements will depend upon many factors, including progress with pre-clinical testing and clinical trials, the number and breadth of our clinical programs, the time and costs involved in preparing, filing, prosecuting, maintaining and enforcing patent claims and other proprietary rights, the time and costs involved in obtaining regulatory approvals, competing technological and market developments, as well as our ability to establish collaborative arrangements, effective commercialization, marketing activities and other arrangements. We expect to continue to incur increasing negative cash flows and net losses for the foreseeable future.

 

Should the U.S. Government elect not to exercise the options for years four and through five of our DARPA contract, the effects may be material to us. The loss of revenues from the DARPA contract would have a material impact on our revenues, operating cash flows and liquidity.

 

Cash Flows

 

Cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities, as reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, are summarized as follows (in thousands):

 

   (In thousands)
For the year ended
 
   March 31,
2014
   March 31,
2013
 
Cash (used in) provided by:          
Operating activities  $(2,139)  $(2,099)
Investing activities   (96)    
Financing activities   3,360    2,080 
Net increase (decrease) in cash  $1,125   $(19)

 

NET CASH FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES. We used cash in our operating activities due to our losses from operations. Net cash used in operating activities was approximately $2,139,000 in fiscal 2014 compared to net cash used in operating activities of approximately $2,099,000 in fiscal 2013, an increase of $40,000.  The $40,000 increase was primarily due to changes in our operating assets and liabilities.

 

NET CASH FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we used approximately $96,000 in cash for purchases of equipment. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, we did not purchase any equipment or have any other investing activities.  

 

NET CASH FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES. Net cash generated from financing activities increased from approximately $2,080,000 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013 to approximately $3,360,000 in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014. Included in net cash provided by financing activities in fiscal 2014 were approximately $3,177,000 from the issuance of common stock and $400,000 from the issuance of notes payable, which was partially offset by approximately $217,000 in repayments of notes payable in cash.  In fiscal 2013, we received approximately $2,110,000 from the issuance of common stock, which was partially offset by approximately $30,000 in repayments of notes payable and related accrued interest in cash.

 

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CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE AND WARRANTS

 

AMENDED AND RESTATED SERIES A 12% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In June 2010, we entered into Amended and Restated 12% Series A Convertible Promissory Notes (the "Amended and Restated Notes") with the holders of certain promissory notes previously issued by the Company (“Amended Series A 10% Convertible Notes” or the "Prior Notes"), and all amendments to the Prior Notes.

 

The Amended and Restated Notes, in the principal amount of $900,000 matured on December 31, 2010. In connection with the restructuring we paid $54,001 of accrued and default interest through the date of the restructuring, liquidated damages of $205,000 and $54,003 of prepaid interest through the expiration date in the aggregate amount of $313,004 through the issuance of units ("Units") at a fixed rate of $0.20 per Unit, each Unit consisting of one share of our common stock and one common stock purchase warrant to purchase one share of our common stock at a fixed exercise price of $0.20 per share as prescribed in the Amended and Restated Note Agreement.  The noteholders have antidilution price protection on the Amended and Restated Notes.

 

In addition to the extension of the expiration date of the Amended and Restated Notes to December 31, 2010, we agreed to increase the annual interest rate from ten percent to twelve percent. We also agreed to change the exercise prices on all of the warrants held by the noteholders to $0.20 per share, to change certain formerly contingent warrants to non-contingent warrants and to extend the expiration date of their warrants to February 2016.

 

As of December 31, 2010, the Amended and Restated Notes matured and as of December 31, 2013 remain in default. We have accrued interest at the revised default rate of 20% following the expiration date of December 31, 2010.

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, the holders of $15,000 of the Amended and Restated Notes converted their principal and related accrued interest into common stock per the conversion formula.

 

On June 24, 2014, we entered into an agreement with the Ellen R. Weiner Family Revocable Trust (the “Trust”), a holder of a Series A 12% Convertible Note (the “Note”) (see Note 5), which previously was classified as being in default. As per the agreement, the Trust converted a past due combined principal and interest balance of $1,003,200 into restricted common stock.

 

Additionally, the Trust agreed to waive anti-dilution price protection underlying warrants previously issued to the Trust. Under its agreement, the Trust converted the entire $1,003,200 past due principal and interest balance on the Note, which previously was in default, into an aggregate of 23,318,254 restricted shares of our common stock and five-year warrants to acquire up to 6,809,524 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.042 per share and up to 397,222 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.108 per share (collectively, the “Conversion Securities”).

 

In exchange for the Trust’s conversion in full of the Note and accrued interest and for the waivers of anti-dilution price protection in the previously issued warrants, in addition to the Conversion Securities, we issued to the Trust 75,000 restricted shares of common stock as a service fee, changed the exercise price of all of the previously issued warrants to $.042 per share and extended the expiration date of all of the previously issued warrants to July 1, 2018.

 

On July 8, 2014, we entered into an agreement with the Estate of Allan Bird (the “Estate”), a holder of a Series A 12% Convertible Note (the “Note”) (see Note 5), which previously was classified as being in default. In the Agreement, the Estate agreed to extend the expiration date of the Note to April 1, 2016, to convert approximately $116,970 of accrued interest to equity, and to waive anti-dilution price protection underlying the Note and warrants previously issued to the Estate.

 

Under its agreement, the Estate converted the entire $116,970 past due interest balance on the Note, which previously was in default, into an aggregate of 2,591,846 restricted shares of our common stock. The Estate received five-year warrants to acquire up to 2,321,429 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.042 per share and up to 135,417 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.108 (collectively, the “Conversion Securities”).

 

In exchange for the Estate’s extension of the Note, conversion of accrued interest and for the waivers of anti-dilution price protection in the previously issued warrants, in addition to the Conversion Securities, we issued to the Estate 25,000 restricted shares of common stock as a service fee, changed the exercise price of all of the previously issued warrants to $.042 per share and extended the expiration date of all of the previously issued warrants to July 1, 2018.

 

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DECEMBER 2006 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In January 2014, we paid off the remaining December 2006 10% Note and the related accrued interest balance with a cash payment of $35,055. That payment represented the sum of the $17,000 principal balance and $18,055 of accrued interest

 

2008 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

One 2008 10% Convertible Note in the amount of $25,000 which matured in January 2010 remained outstanding at March 31, 2014. This note is convertible into our common stock at $0.50 per share. We are recording interest at the default rate of 15%.

 

OCTOBER & NOVEMBER 2009 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In October and November 2009, we raised $430,000 from the sale to accredited investors of 10% convertible notes ("October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes"). The October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes matured at various dates between April 2011 and May 2011 and are convertible into our common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.25 per share prior to maturity. The investors also received matching three year warrants to purchase unregistered shares of our common stock at a price of $0.25 per share. We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a 100% discount against the principal of the notes. We are amortizing this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the notes.

 

Deferred financing costs of $20,250 incurred in connection with this financing were issued in the form of a convertible note with warrants on the same terms as those received by the investors. We capitalized the $20,250 of deferred financing costs and amortized them over the term of the notes using the effective interest method.

 

In July 2012, we issued 461,409 shares of common stock to the holder of the $25,000 note in exchange for the value of the principal and related accrued interest of $8,000 under the same terms that we used to sell units consisting of one share of common stock and one-half of a stock purchase warrant on June 29, 2012 (see Note 6). The 461,409 share issuance was priced based on 80% of the trailing five day average before issuance to be consistent with the equity unit structure. As part of that structure, the noteholder also received seven year warrants to purchase 230,705 share of common stock at a price of $0.107 per share. The $16,149 value of the warrant was calculated using the binomial lattice valuation methodology. We recorded a loss on conversion of $45,796 on the conversions in the quarter ended September 30, 2012.

 

The following table shows the conversions into principal of the October and November 2009 Convertible Notes Note by fiscal year:

 

Activity in October and November 2009 Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance, including $250,000 of deferred financing costs  $450,250 
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010   (70,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2011   (175,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012   (130,250)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   (25,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014    
Balance as of March 31, 2014  $50,000 

 

On March 31, 2012, we agreed to extend the expiration date and to change the exercise price of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. We recorded a charge of $77,265 relating to this modification.

 

In September 2013, we agreed to extend the expiration date of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. Management assessed the change in the value of the notes and related warrants before and after that extension and determined that the change in value related to the change in terms was not significant.

 

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APRIL 2010 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTE

 

In April 2010, we raised $75,000 from the sale to an accredited investor of a 10% convertible note. The convertible note matured in October 2011 and is convertible into our common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.25 per share prior to maturity. The investor also received three year warrants to purchase 300,000 unregistered shares of our common stock at a price of $0.25 per share.

 

We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a 100% discount against the principal of the notes. We amortized this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the note. As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the April 2010 10% Convertible Note.

 

On March 31, 2012, we agreed to extend the expiration date and to change the exercise price of certain warrants of the note holder by two years in exchange for his extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note by that same two year period. We recorded a charge of $77,265 relating to this modification in the quarter ended March 31, 2012.

 

In September 2013, we agreed to extend the expiration date of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. Management assessed the change in the value of the notes and related warrants before and after that extension and determined that the change in value related to the change in terms was not significant.

 

SEPTEMBER 2010 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

On September 3, 2010, we entered into a Subscription Agreement with three accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) providing for the issuance and sale of convertible promissory notes and corresponding warrants in the aggregate principal amount of $1,430,000. The initial closing under the Subscription Agreement resulted in the issuance and sale of (i) convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $743,600, (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 3,718,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.31125 per share, and (iii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 3,718,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.43575 per share. The convertible promissory notes bear interest compounded monthly at the annual rate of ten percent (10%) and matured on September 3, 2011. The aggregate gross cash proceeds were $650,000, the balance of the principal amount representing a due diligence fee and an original issuance discount. The convertible promissory notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of our common stock at a price per share equal to eighty percent (80%) of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock as reported by Bloomberg L.P. for the principal market on which the common stock trades or is quoted for the ten (10) trading days preceding the proposed conversion date. Subject to adjustment as described in the notes, the conversion price may not be more than $0.30 nor less than $0.20. There are no registration requirements with respect to the shares of common stock underlying the notes or the warrants. 

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the September 2010 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at twelve percent per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of fifteen percent at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12% from a total of $693,260 to a total of $776,451.

 

During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision). If our other note and warrant holders agree to waive the antidilution provisions of their securities on the same basis as agreed to by the Investors, then we will no longer be required to report a derivative liability in its financial statements with the accompanying quarterly adjustments to its financial statements and will transfer the amount shown as a derivative liability to equity.

 

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The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended from dates between September 3, 2015 and September 23, 2016 to January 1, 2017.

 

The following table shows the activity in the September 2010 10% Convertible Notes by fiscal year:

 

Activity in September 2010 10% Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance  $743,600 
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012   (405,500)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   (30,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014   (25,000)
Increase in principal balance due to 12% extension fee   33,972 
Balance as of March 31, 2014  $317,072 

 

APRIL 2011 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In April 2011, we entered into a Subscription Agreement with two accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) providing for the issuance and sale of convertible promissory notes and corresponding warrants in the aggregate principal amount of $385,000. The closing under the Subscription Agreement resulted in the issuance and sale by us of (i) convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $385,000, (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,004,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, and (iii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,004,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.175 per share. The convertible promissory notes bear interest compounded monthly at the annual rate of ten percent and matured on April 1, 2012. The aggregate gross cash proceeds to us were $350,000, the balance of the principal amount representing a due diligence fee and an original issuance discount. The convertible promissory notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of our common stock at a price per share equal to eighty percent (80%) of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock as reported by Bloomberg L.P. for the principal market on which the common stock trades or is quoted for the ten (10) trading days preceding the proposed conversion date. Subject to adjustment as described in the notes, the conversion price may not be more than $0.20 nor less than $0.10. There are no registration requirements with respect to the shares of common stock underlying the notes or the warrants.

 

In addition, we issued (i) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 812,500 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, and (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 812,500 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.175 per share to the Purchasers. These warrants were issued as an antidilution adjustment under certain common stock purchase warrants held by the Purchasers that were acquired from us in September 2010.

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the April 2011 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at twelve percent per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of fifteen percent at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12% from a total of $693,260 to a total of $776,451.

 

During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision). If our other note and warrant holders agree to waive the antidilution provisions of their securities on the same basis as agreed to by the Investors, then we will no longer be required to report a derivative liability in its financial statements with the accompanying quarterly adjustments to its financial statements and will transfer the amount shown as a derivative liability to equity.

 

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The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended from dates between September 3, 2015 and September 23, 2016 to January 1, 2017.

 

As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the April 2011 10% Convertible Notes and the 12% extension fee noted above increased the principal balance by $48,048 to a principal balance of $ 448,448.

 

JULY & AUGUST 2011 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2011, we raised $357,656 in 10% convertible notes. Those notes had a fixed conversion price of $0.09 per share and carried an interest rate of 10%. The convertible notes matured in July and August 2012. We also issued those investors five year warrants to purchase 3,973,957 shares of common stock at $0.125 per share.

 

We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a $257,926 discount against the principal of the notes. We amortized this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the note. As of September 30, 2013, there have not been any conversions of the July & August 2011 10% Convertible Notes.

 

Effective July 14, 2012, holders of three notes totaling $100,000 agreed to extend the expiration date of their notes to July 13, 2013. Subsequent to June 30, 2013, the holders of the three notes agreed to extend their notes to July 16, 2014. As part of the extension, we agreed to capitalize accrued interest of $20,027 into the principal balance.

 

Effective March 31, 2014, the holders of the three notes totaling $100,000 converted all of their principal and accrued interest into 1,438,700 shares of our common stock at the contractual conversion price of $0.09 per share.

 

At March 31, 2014, the outstanding principal balance was $257,655, all of which was in default. We are recording interest at the default interest rate of 15%.

 

SEPTEMBER 2011 CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

On September 23, 2011, we entered into a Subscription Agreement with two accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) providing for the issuance and sale of convertible promissory notes and corresponding warrants in the aggregate principal amount of $253,760. The warrants carried a five-year term to purchase an aggregate of 3,625,143 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share. The convertible promissory notes do not bear an interest rate and mature on September 23, 2012. The aggregate net cash proceeds to us were $175,000, the balance of the principal amount representing a due diligence fee and an original issuance discount. The convertible promissory notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of our common stock at a price per share equal to $0.07. Subject to adjustments as described in the notes, the conversion price may not be more than $0.07. There are no registration requirements with respect to the shares of common stock underlying the notes or the warrants.

 

We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a $168,804 discount against the principal of the notes. We amortized this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the note.

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the September 2011 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at twelve percent per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of fifteen percent at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12% from a total of $693,260 to a total of $776,451.

 

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During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision). If our other note and warrant holders agree to waive the antidilution provisions of their securities on the same basis as agreed to by the Investors, then we will no longer be required to report a derivative liability in its financial statements with the accompanying quarterly adjustments to its financial statements and will transfer the amount shown as a derivative liability to equity.

 

The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended from dates between September 3, 2015 and September 23, 2016 to January 1, 2017.

 

The following table shows the conversions into principal of the September 2011 Convertible Notes by fiscal year:

 

Activity in September 2011 Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance   $ 253,760  
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012     (15,000 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013     (60,000 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014     (169,000 )
Increase in principal balance due to extension fee     1,171  
Balance as of March 31, 2014   $ 10,931  

 

LAW FIRM NOTE NUMBER 1

 

On March 22, 2012, we entered into a Promissory Note with our corporate law firm for the amount of $75,000, which represented the majority of the amount we owed to that firm. The Promissory Note originally had a maturity date of December 31, 2012 and bears interest at five percent per annum. The note is convertible at the option of the holder into shares of our common stock at a 10% discount to the market price of the common stock on the date prior to conversion with a floor price on such conversions of $0.08 per share. This ability of the holder to convert became exercisable upon the amendment of the Articles of Incorporation increasing the authorized shares of our common stock to a number greater than 250,000,000. As that increase in the authorized number of shares of our common stock was approved by our stockholders at a Special Stockholders Meeting on June 4, 2012, this note was reclassified to a convertible note as of June 30, 2012. During the quarter ended June 30, 2013, the parties agreed to extend the Maturity Date of the Note to October 1, 2013 and subsequent to September 30, 2013, the expiration date of this note was again extended to October 1, 2014. As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the Law Firm Note.

 

At March 31, 2014, the outstanding principal balance was $75,000.

 

LAW FIRM NOTE NUMBER 2

 

On June 4, 2013, we entered into a Promissory Note with our corporate law firm for the amount of $47,000, which represented approximately 50% of the amount we owed to that firm for services in 2012. The Promissory Note had a maturity date of October 1, 2014 and bears interest at five percent per annum. The note was convertible at the option of the holder into shares of our common stock at a 10% discount to the market price of the common stock on the date prior to conversion with a floor price on such conversions of $0.07 per share.

 

Effective March 31, 2014, our law firm converted this note and all related accrued interest into 302,043 shares of our common stock at a conversion price of $0.16 per share.

 

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SECURITIES ISSUED FOR SERVICES

 

We have issued securities in payment of services to reduce our obligations and to avoid using our cash resources. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 we issued 3,071,150 common shares for services of which 1,568,124 were restricted and were for investor relations services and corporate communications services. Included in the 3,071,150 common shares issued for services are 1,503,026 shares, registered under Form S-8 registration statements, which were issued as follows: 71,140 for financial consulting, 419,069 for scientific consulting and 1,012,817 for legal services. The average price discount of common shares issued for these services, weighted by the number of shares issued for services in this period, was approximately 16.0%.

 

SECURITIES ISSUED FOR DEBT

 

We have also issued securities for debt to reduce our obligations to avoid using our cash resources. In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 we issued 10,574,024 restricted common shares for repayment in full of notes, including accrued interest, in the aggregate amount of $726,776. The price discount of the common stock issued for debt was approximately 43.2%.

 

PROSPECTS FOR DEBT CONVERSION

 

We seek, where possible, to convert our debt and accounts payable to stock and/or warrants in order to reduce our cash liabilities. Our success at accomplishing this depends on several factors including market conditions, investor acceptance and other factors, including our business prospects.

 

GOING CONCERN

 

Our independent registered public accounting firm has stated in their audit report on our March 31, 2014 consolidated financial statements that our working capital deficiency and our accumulated deficit are conditions that, among others, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires us to make a number of estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements. Such estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate estimates and assumptions based upon historical experience and various other factors and circumstances. We believe our estimates and assumptions are reasonable in the circumstances; however, actual results may differ from these estimates under different future conditions. We believe that the estimates and assumptions that are most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations, in that they require the most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, form the basis for the accounting policies deemed to be most critical to us. These critical accounting estimates relate to revenue recognition, stock purchase warrants issued with notes payable, beneficial conversion feature of convertible notes payable, impairment of intangible assets and long lived assets, stock compensation, deferred tax asset valuation allowance, and contingencies.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

We measure the fair value of applicable financial and non-financial instruments based on the following fair value hierarchy:

 

Level 1: Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2: Observable market based inputs or unobservable inputs that are corroborated by market data.

 

Level 3: Unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data.

 

The hierarchy noted above requires us to minimize the use of unobservable inputs and to use observable market data, if available, when determining fair value.

 

The fair value of derivative liabilities is determined based on unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data, which is a Level 3 classification. We record derivative liabilities on our balance sheet at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in our consolidated statements of operations.

 

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Revenue Recognition

 

With respect to revenue recognition, we entered into a government contract with DARPA and have recognized revenue during the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 of $1,466,482 and $1,230,004, respectively, under such contract. We adopted the Milestone method of revenue recognition for the DARPA contract under ASC 605-28 “Revenue Recognition – Milestone Method” and we believe we meet the requirements under ASC 605-28 for reporting contract revenue under the Milestone Method for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.

 

We also recognize revenue under for a secondary smaller contract under a time and materials non-fixed price basis where we recognize revenue as the services are performed. 

 

Stock Purchase Warrants

 

We grant warrants in connection with the issuance of certain notes payable and other financing transactions. When such warrants are classified as equity, we measure the relative estimated fair value of such warrants which represents a discount from the face amount of the notes payable. Such discounts are amortized to interest expense over the term of the notes. We analyze such warrants for classification as either equity or derivative liabilities, and value them based on binomial lattice models.

 

Beneficial Conversion Feature of Notes Payable

 

The convertible feature of certain notes payable provides for a rate of conversion that is below market value. Such feature is normally characterized as a "Beneficial Conversion Feature" ("BCF"). We measure the estimated fair value of the BCF in circumstances in which the conversion feature is not required to be separated from the host instrument and accounted for separately, and record that value in the consolidated financial statements as a discount from the face amount of the notes. Such discounts are amortized to interest expense over the term of the notes.

 

Share-based Compensation

 

We account for share-based compensation awards using the fair-value method and record such expense based on the grant date fair value in the consolidated financial statements over the requisite service period.

 

Derivative Instruments

 

We evaluate free-standing derivative instruments (or embedded derivatives) to properly classify such instruments within equity or as liabilities in our financial statements. Our policy is to settle instruments indexed to our common shares on a first-in-first-out basis.

 

The classification of a derivative instrument is reassessed at each reporting date. If the classification changes as a result of events during a reporting period, the instrument is reclassified as of the date of the event that caused the reclassification. There is no limit on the number of times a contract may be reclassified.

 

Instruments classified as derivative liabilities are remeasured each reporting period (or upon reclassification) and the change in fair value is recorded on our consolidated statement of operations in other expense (income).

 

Deferred Tax Asset Valuation Allowance

 

Deferred tax assets are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to the difference between the consolidated financial statements and their respective tax basis. Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of (a) temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts reported for income tax purposes, and (b) tax credit carryforwards. We record a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets when, based on our best estimate of taxable income (if any) in the foreseeable future, it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax assets may not be realized.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have not entered into any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

As a Smaller Reporting Company, we are not required to furnish information under this Item 7A.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The consolidated financial statements listed in the accompanying Index to Financial Statements are attached hereto and filed as a part of this Report under Item 15.

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, we evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act) as of a date within 90 days prior to filing the Company's March 31, 2014 Form 10-K.

 

Based on such evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of the end of such period, due to the material weaknesses in our internal controls over financial reporting identified below, our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective in recording, processing, summarizing and reporting, on a timely basis, information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act and are not effective in ensuring that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

(a) MANAGEMENT'S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. The Company's internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the registrant's annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

The Company's management, with the participation of its Chief Executive Officer, assessed the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2014. In making this assessment, the Company used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of The Treadway Commission in Internal Control-Integrated Framework. Based on that assessment under such criteria, management concluded that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of March 31, 2014 due to control deficiencies that constituted material weaknesses.

 

Management in assessing its internal controls and procedures for fiscal 2014 identified a material weakness relating to a lack of sufficient segregation of duties, particularly in cash disbursements. Specifically, this material weakness is such that the design of controls over the area of cash disbursements relies primarily on detective controls and could be strengthened by adding preventative controls to properly safeguard company assets.

 

Management has also identified a material weakness relating to a lack of sufficient personnel in the accounting function due to the limited resources of the Company with appropriate skills, training and experience to perform the review processes to ensure the complete and proper application of generally accepted accounting principles. Specifically, this material weakness led to segregation of duties issues and resulted in audit adjustments to the annual consolidated financial statements and revisions to related disclosures.

 

The Company is in the process of developing and implementing remediation plans to address its material weaknesses.

 

Management has identified specific remedial actions to address the material weaknesses described above:

 

  · Improve the effectiveness of the accounting group by continuing to augment existing Company resources with additional consultants or employees to improve segregation procedures and to assist in the analysis and recording of complex accounting transactions and preparation of tax disclosures. The Company plans to mitigate the segregation of duties issues by hiring additional personnel in the accounting department once the Company has achieved commercialization of its products and is generating more significant levels of revenue, or has raised significant additional working capital.

 

  · Improve segregation procedures by strengthening cross approval of various functions including cash disbursements and quarterly internal audit procedures where appropriate.  We expect this to occur after the Company has achieved commercialization of its products and is generating revenue, or has raised significant additional working capital.

 

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Due to its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.

 

(b) CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

There were no significant changes made in our internal controls over financial reporting during the quarter ended March 31, 2014 that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect these controls.

  

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

During the fourth quarter of the year ended March 31, 2014, we issued the following securities that were not registered under the Securities Act and have not been included previously in a Current Report on Form 8-K. We did not employ any form of general solicitation or advertising in connection with the offer and sale of the securities described below. In addition, we believe the recipients of the securities are "accredited investors" as defined in Rule 501(a) of the Securities Act. For these reasons, among others, the offer and sale of the following securities were made in reliance on the exemption from registration provided by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act or Regulation D promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act:     

 

On January 29, 2014, we issued 95,222 shares of restricted common stock to a warrant holder as the result of cashless warrant exercises.

 

On February 21, 2014, we issued 399,781 shares of restricted common stock to a consultant valued at $62,500 for investor relations services.

 

On February 24, 2014, we issued 897,436 shares of restricted common stock to a note holder in exchange for the conversion of accrued interest on a convertible note payable in an aggregate amount of $49,000 at a conversion price of $0.0546 per share based upon the conversion formula in the note.

 

On March 14, 2014, we issued 112,945 shares of restricted common stock to a warrant holder as the result of cashless warrant exercises.

 

On March 26, 2014, a former director exercised 182,927 stock options by paying $2,000 in cash and applying $13,000 in accrued expenses that we owed to that former director. The exercise price on that stock option was $0.082.

 

On March 31, 2014, we issued 1,740,743 shares of restricted common stock to four noteholders in exchange for the conversion of principal and accrued interest on convertible notes payable in an aggregate amount of $177,316 at an average conversion price of $0.102 per share based upon the conversion formulae in the notes.

 

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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

SECTION 16(a) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires our officers, directors, and persons who own more than 10% of a registered class of our equity securities to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership with the SEC. Officers, directors, and greater than 10% beneficial owners are required by SEC regulation to furnish the Company with copies of all Section 16(a) forms they file. Based solely on our review of copies of the Section 16(a) reports filed for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we believe that all filing requirements applicable to our officers, directors, and greater than 10% beneficial owners were complied with except as follows:

  

Mr. James A. Joyce, our Chief Executive Officer, did not timely file one report on Form 4 pertaining to two late reported transactions. The dates of the transactions were June 26, 2012 and July 1, 2013. The relevant report was filed on September 6, 2013.

 

Dr. Chetan S. Shah, one of our directors, did not timely file one report on Form 3 pertaining to one late reported event and one report on Form 4 pertaining to one late reported transaction. The date of the event was June 18, 2013, and the date of the event was March 14, 2014. The relevant reports were filed on July 15, 2013 and March 27, 2014, respectively.

 

Mr. James B. Frakes, our Chief Financial Officer, did not timely file one report on Form 4 pertaining to one late reported transaction. The date of the transaction was July 1, 2013. The relevant report was filed on September 6, 2013.

 

Mr. Rodney S. Kenley, our President, did not timely file one report on Form 4 pertaining to one late reported transaction. The date of the transaction was July 1, 2013. The relevant report was filed on September 6, 2013.

 

Dr. Richard H. Tullis, our Chief Science Officer, did not timely file one report on Form 4 pertaining to one late reported transaction. The date of the transaction was July 1, 2013. The relevant report was filed on September 6, 2013.

 

Mr. Phillip A. Ward, a former director who resigned from such position on January 9, 2014, did not timely file two reports on Form 4 pertaining to two late reported transactions. The dates of the transactions were July 9, 2013 and March 14, 2014. The relevant reports were filed on July 15, 2013 and April 14, 2014, respectively.

 

Mr. Thomas V. Wornham, a former director who resigned from such position on January 9, 2014, did not file one report on Form 4 pertaining to one transaction. The date of the transaction was March 14, 2014.

 

Mr. Edward G. Broenniman, one of our directors, did not timely file one report on Form 4 pertaining to one late reported transaction. The date of the transaction was March 14, 2014. The relevant report was filed on March 19, 2014.

 

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CONTROL PERSONS

 

The names, ages and positions of our directors and executive officers as of July 9, 2014 are listed below:

 

NAMES TITLE OR POSITION AGE
James A. Joyce (1) Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Secretary 52
     
Richard H. Tullis, PhD (2) Vice President, Chief Science Officer and Director 69
     
Rodney S. Kenley (3) President and Director 64
     
James B. Frakes  (4) Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President - Finance 57
     
Franklyn S. Barry, Jr. Director 74
     
Edward G. Broenniman Director 78
     
Chetan S. Shah, MD Director 45

 

(1) Effective June 1, 2001, Mr. Joyce was appointed our President and Chief Executive Officer, replacing Mr. Barry, who continues as a member of the Board of Directors. Mr. Joyce resigned from the position of President upon the appointment of Mr. Kenley to such position on October 27, 2010.

 

(2) Effective June 1, 2001, Dr. Tullis was appointed as our Chief Science Officer.

 

(3) Effective October 27, 2010, Mr. Kenley was appointed as our President.

 

(4) Effective September 27, 2010, Mr. Frakes was appointed as our Chief Financial Officer.

 

Certain additional information concerning the individuals named above is set forth below. This information is based on information furnished us by each individual noted.

 

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Resumes of Management:

 

James A. Joyce, Chairman, CEO and Secretary.

 

Mr. Joyce is the founder of Aethlon Medical, and has been the Chairman of the Board and Secretary since March 1999. On June 1, 2001, our Board of Directors appointed Mr. Joyce with the additional role of CEO. Mr. Joyce also serves as the Executive Chairman of ESI. In 1992, Mr. Joyce founded and was the sole shareholder of James Joyce & Associates, an organization that provided management consulting and corporate finance advisory services to CEOs and CFOs of publicly traded companies. Previously, from 1989 to 1991, Mr. Joyce was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Mission Labs, Inc. Prior to that Mr. Joyce was a principal in charge of U.S. operations for London Zurich Securities, Inc. Mr. Joyce is a graduate of the University of Maryland.

 

Richard H. Tullis, Ph.D., Vice President, Chief Science Officer

 

Dr. Tullis has been Vice President and a director of the Company since January 2000 and Chief Science Officer since June 2001. Dr. Tullis has extensive biotechnology management and research experience, and is the founder of Syngen Research, formerly a wholly-owned subsidiary of Aethlon Medical, Inc. Previously, Dr. Tullis co-founded Molecular Biosystems, Inc., a former NYSE company. At Molecular Biosystems, Dr. Tullis was Director of Oligonucleotide Hybridization, Senior Research Scientist and Member of the Board of Directors. In research, Dr. Tullis developed and patented the first application of oligonucleotides to antisense antibiotics and developed new methods for the chemical synthesis of DNA via methoxy-hosphorochloridites. Dr. Tullis also co-developed the first applications of covalently coupled DNA-enzyme conjugates using synthetic oligonucleotides during his tenure at Molecular Biosystems. In 1985, Dr. Tullis founded, and served as President and CEO of Synthetic Genetics, Inc., a pioneer in custom DNA synthesis, which was sold to Molecular Biology Resources in 1991. Dr. Tullis also served as interim-CEO of Genetic Vectors, Inc., which completed its IPO under his management, and was co-founder of DNA Sciences, Inc., a company that was eventually acquired by Genetic Vectors. Dr. Tullis received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Cell Biology from the University of California at San Diego, and has done extensive post-doctoral work at UCSD, USC, and the University of Hawaii.

 

Rodney S. Kenley, President and Director

 

Mr. Kenley has been President and a Director since October 2010. He has 34 years of experience in healthcare, most of which have been spent in the extracorporeal blood purification arena. Mr. Kenley held several positions at Baxter Healthcare (Travenol) from 1977 through 1990 including International Marketing Manager, Business Unit Manager for Peritoneal and Hemodialysis products, Manager of New Business Development, Director of Worldwide Product Planning, Director of Advanced Product Development, and VP of Electronic Drug Infusion. During this tenure he conceived of and managed the launch of several new products that have been highly commercially successful including the HomeChoice peritoneal dialysis cycler.

 

Mr. Kenley founded Aksys Ltd. in January 1991 to develop and commercialize his concept of a daily home hemodialysis system which was commercially launched in 2002 as the PHD system. In 2004, Mr. Kenley initiated the development of a second-generation home hemodialysis system in partnership with DEKA Research & Development Corporation in Manchester, New Hampshire. In 2007, the assets of Aksys Ltd. were acquired by DEKA, where Mr. Kenley was employed prior to joining Aethlon.

 

Mr. Kenley is the recipient of over 30 patents.

 

Mr. Kenley received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Biology and Chemistry from Wabash College, a Masters of Science degree in Molecular Biology from Northwestern University and a Masters of Management from the Kellogg School of Management, also at Northwestern University.

 

James B. Frakes, Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President – Finance

 

Mr. Frakes joined Aethlon Medical in January 2008 and brought 16 consecutive years of financial responsibility for publicly traded companies, as well as specific knowledge and experience in equity and debt transactions, acquisitions, public reporting and Sarbanes-Oxley section 404 internal control requirements. Mr. Frakes also serves as the Chief Financial Officer of ESI.

 

He previously served as the CFO for Left Behind Games Inc., a start-up video game company. Prior to 2006, he served as CFO of NTN Buzztime, Inc., an interactive entertainment company with $40 million in sales, where he played a key role in acquisitions that doubled the company's revenue. Mr. Frakes received an MBA from the University of Southern California and completed his BA with Honors at Stanford University.

 

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Franklyn S. Barry, Jr.

 

Mr. Barry has over 30 years of experience in managing and building companies. He was President and Chief Executive Officer of Hemex from April 1997 through May 31, 2001 and our President and CEO from March 10, 1999 to May 31, 2001. He became a director of Aethlon Medical on March 10, 1999. From 1994 to April 1997, Mr. Barry was a private consultant. Included among his prior experiences are tenures as President of Fisher-Price and as co-founder and CEO of Software Distribution Services, which today operates as Ingram Micro-D, an international distributor of personal computer products. Mr. Barry serves on the Board of Directors of Merchants Mutual Insurance Company.

 

Edward G. Broenniman

 

Mr. Broenniman became a director of Aethlon Medical in March 1999. Mr. Broenniman has 30 years of management and executive experience with high-tech, privately-held growth companies where he has served as a CEO, COO, or corporate advisor, using his expertise to focus management on increasing profitability and stockholder value. He is the Managing Director of The Piedmont Group, LLC, a venture advisory firm. Mr. Broenniman recently served on the Board of Directors of publicly-traded QuesTech (acquired by CACI International), and currently serves on the Boards of four privately-held firms. His nonprofit Boards are the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship's Board of Advisors at the University of Maryland, the National Association of Corporate Directors, National Capital Chapter and the Board of the Association for Corporate Growth, National Capital Chapter.

 

Chetan S. Shah, MD

 

Dr. Shah became a director of Aethlon Medical in June 2013. Dr. Shah is a board certified Otolaryngologist. He is an Advisory Board Member at The Bank of Princeton, and a founder, partner and Board member of the Surgery Center at Hamilton as well as Physician Management Systems and Princeton Eye & Ear. Dr. Shah serves on the board of two other private companies. He holds teaching positions and serves on multiple hospital committees in the area and is on the Audiology and Speech Language Pathology Committee for the State of New Jersey. He also is a member of the board of medical examiners for the state of New Jersey. Dr. Shah received his Bachelor’s degree and Medical Degree from Rutgers University and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

 

Our Board of Directors has the responsibility for establishing broad corporate policies and for overseeing our overall performance. Members of the Board are kept informed of our business activities through discussions with the CEO, President and other officers, by reviewing analyses and reports sent to them, and by participating in Board and committee meetings. Our bylaws provide that each of the directors serves for a term that extends to the next Annual Meeting of Shareholders of the Company. Our Board of Directors presently has an Audit Committee and a Compensation Committee on each of which Messrs. Barry, Broenniman and Shah serve. Mr. Barry is Chairman of the Audit Committee, and Dr. Shah is Chairman of the Compensation Committee.

 

In July 2012, our Board of Directors approved a new Board Compensation Program (the “New Program” or the “2012 Program”), which modifies and supersedes the 2005 Directors Compensation Program (the “2005 Program”) that was previously in effect. Under the New Program, in which only non-employee Directors may participate, an eligible Director will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of ten year options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. In addition, under the New Program eligible Directors will receive cash compensation equal to $500 for each committee meeting attended and $1,000 for each formal Board meeting attended.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our four outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,667,105 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.076 per share.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our five outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,595,536 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.082 per share.

 

At March 31, 2014 under the 2005 Directors Compensation Program we had issued 1,337,825 options to outside directors and 3,965,450 options to employee-directors, 514,550 outside directors’ options had been forfeited, 250,000 outside directors’ options had been exercised and 3,671,550 options remained outstanding.

 

On June 6, 2014, our Board of Directors approved certain changes to the New Program. Under the modified New Program, a new eligible Director will receive an initial grant of $50,000 worth of options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. These options will have a term of ten years and will vest 1/3 upon grant and 1/3 upon each of the first two anniversaries of the date of grant. In addition, at the beginning of each fiscal year, each existing Director eligible to participate in the modified New Program also will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of options valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. Such options will vest on the first anniversary of the date of grant. In lieu of per meeting fees, under the modified New Program eligible Directors will receive an annual Board retainer fee of $30,000. The modified New Program also provides for the following annual retainer fees: Audit Committee Chair - $5,000, Compensation Committee chair - $5,000, Audit Committee member - $4,000, Compensation Committee member - $4,000 and Lead independent director - $15,000.

 

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FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS.

 

There are no family relationships between or among the directors, executive officers or persons nominated or chosen by us to become directors or executive officers.

 

There are no arrangements or understandings between any two or more of our directors or executive officers or between any of our directors or executive officers and any other person pursuant to which any director or officer was or is to be selected as a director or officer, and there is no arrangement, plan or understanding as to whether non-management shareholders will exercise their voting rights to continue to elect the current Board of Directors. There are also no arrangements, agreements or understandings between non-management shareholders that may directly or indirectly participate in or influence the management of our affairs.

 

SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD

 

Each person listed below is a current member of our Science Advisory Board (SAB). During the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, we divided our Science Advisory Board into three groups: the Extracorporeal Therapy Advisory Board, the Sepsis and Inflammation Advisory Board and the Cancer Advisory Board.  The role of the Science Advisory Board is to provide scientific guidance related to the development of our Aethlon ADAPT(TM) technology. Unlike the members of our Board of Directors, the Science Advisory Board members are not involved in the management or operations of our company. Members of the Science Advisory Board are paid stipends for attending SAB meetings.

 

 

Extracorporeal Therapy Advisory Board Sepsis & Inflammation Advisory Board Cancer Advisory Board
Gregory T. A. Kovacs, M.D., Ph.D. Irshad H. Chaudry, Ph.D. Laszlo Radvanyi, Ph.D.
John A. Kellum, M.D Larry D. Cowgill, D.V.M., Ph.D.  
Nathan W. Levin, M.D.  Charles J. Fisher, Jr., M.D.  
Claudio Ronco, M.D.  Geert Schmid-Schцnbein, Ph.D.  
David M. Ward, M.D.    

 

EXTRACORPOREAL THERAPY ADVISORY BOARD

 

Gregory T.A. Kovacs, M.D., Ph.D.

 

Dr. Kovacs is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University with a courtesy appointment in the Department of Medicine. He received a BASc degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of British Columbia, an MS degree in Bioengineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a PhD and an MD degree from Stanford University. Dr. Kovacs is the Director of Medical Device Technologies for the Astrobionics Program at the NASA Ames Research Center, and Principal Investigator for the NASA/Stanford National Center for Space Biological Technologies. This Center is charged with developing advanced medical devices to enable extended human spaceflight and instrumentation/payloads for biological experiments. Dr. Kovacs also has extensive industry experience including co-founding and providing technical guidance for several companies, including Cepheid in Sunnyvale, CA, supplier of advanced instrumentation for clinical and research nucleic acid diagnostics.  Through Northrup Grumman, Cepheid supplies the automated biothreat detection systems in use by the United States Postal Service.  He is a long-standing member of the Defense Sciences Research Council (DARPA), and has served as Associate Chair and Chairman. In this capacity, he has led or co-led studies on a variety of topics from chemical and biological agent detection and decontamination, miniaturized biological instrumentation, jungle warfare technologies, and many others. Between 2008 and 2011, Dr. Kovacs was on leave from Stanford University to serve as director of the Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA.

 

John A. Kellum, M.D.

 

Dr. Kellum is a tenured professor of Critical Care Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.  He is a clinician scientist whose research interests span various aspects of Critical Care Medicine, but center in critical care nephrology (including acid-base, and renal replacement therapy), sepsis and multi-organ failure (including blood purification), and clinical epidemiology.  His research has received continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health since 2001 and he has active funding from multiple different NIH Institutes.  Dr. Kellum has authored more than 300 publications and has also edited several major textbooks including Critical Care Nephrology 2nd Edition (WB Saunders), and Stewart's Textbook of Acid-Base, 2nd Edition (www.acidbase.org). He has won several teaching awards, lectures widely, and has given more than 300 seminars and invited lectures related to his research.  Dr. Kellum has been involved in the development of several clinical practice guidelines.  He is a founding member and past president of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (www.ADQI.net) and is co-chair of the Kidney Diseases Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) clinical practice guideline on acute kidney injury (www.kdigo.org). Finally Dr. Kellum is a leader in electronic research especially in critical illness and is the Director of CARe (Center for Assistance in Research using the eRecord) also at the University of Pittsburgh.

 

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Nathan W. Levin, M.D.

 

Dr. Levin is the Chairman, Research Board of the Renal Research Institute and Professor of Clinical Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Past Medical and Research Director, Renal Research Institute (1997-2010).  Dr. Levin is the Chair of the Selection Committee for the Lillian Jean Kaplan International Prize for Advancement in the Understanding of Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD). He is the Co-Founder of Sustainable Kidney Care Foundation.  Dr. Levin is an advisor to the Board of KidneyTel.  He has lectured nationally and internationally on topics relating to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hemodialysis. He is the Principal Investigator of the NIH sponsored study of Frequent Dialysis.  Dr. Levin is currently an adjunct Professor of Medicine at the School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the Honorary Chair, Peking University, in Beijing, China.  Dr. Levin contributes to the global CKD community in a variety of functions.

 

Claudio Ronco, M.D.

 

Dr. Ronco is Director of the Department of Nephrology at St. Bortolo Hospital in Vicenza.  He is a member of the council of several scientific societies and is Editor in Chief of the International Journal of Artificial Organs.  He has received numerous awards and honors, including the International Medal of Excellence from the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) and honorary membership of the Spanish Society of Nephrology (SSN).  Dr. Ronco has organized several congresses and meetings in the area of nephrology and intensive care and is a member of several advisory groups for clinical trials and dialysis research.  He has co-authored over 650 papers, 36 book chapters, 45 books and seven monographic journal issues, and has delivered more than 450 lectures at international meetings and universities.  In 1989, Dr. Ronco was awarded his diploma in pediatric nephrology at the University of Naples, having achieved a specialized diploma in medical nephrology at the Post-graduate School of Internal Medicine at the University of Padua in 1979.  He graduated in medicine from the University of Padua, having been an intern at the Institute of Clinical Internal Medicine at the same institution.

 

David M. Ward, M.D.

 

Dr. Ward trained in nephrology in Scotland and did a second fellowship in renal immunopathology at Scripps Research Foundation.  Since 1977 he has been a member of the Division of Nephrology at UCSD. He directed the dialysis unit and clinical nephrology program at UCSD for 19 years, and has directed the therapeutic apheresis program for the last 22 years.  At different times he has served the UCSD Medical School as Assistant Dean for Clinical Affairs, Chief of Staff of the Hospital, and Chairman of the UCSD Medical Group. Special interests include immunological diseases, glomerular diseases, transplantation medicine, apheresis medicine, hemodialysis technology, innovative extracorporeal blood circuits, and general clinical nephrology. He practices, publishes and teaches in these areas, including authoring chapters in standard textbooks such as "Rheumatology" and "Clinical Dialysis". 

 

SEPSIS & INFLAMMATION ADVISORY BOARD

 

Irshad H. Chaudry, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Chaudry is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal SHOCK®, a leading research publication that reviews novel therapeutic advances to address shock, trauma, sepsis, inflammation, ischemia, and related pathobiological states, with particular emphasis on the biologic mechanisms that determine the response to such injury.  Dr. Chaudry received a B.S. as well as a M.S. with honors from Sind University, and a Ph.D. from Monash University, Australia. After his postdoctoral training at Toronto University, Canada, he was appointed Instructor and subsequently an Assistant Professor at the Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine. He then moved to Yale University as an Associate Professor and subsequently became a Professor. He moved to Michigan State University in 1986 as Professor and Director of Research and in 1996 became the Director of the Center for Surgical Research at Brown University. In 2000, he became the Director of the Center for Surgical Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and the Vice Chairman of the Department of Surgery. He has over 500 publications to his credit and is a recipient of the NIH MERIT award.

 

Larry D. Cowgill, D.V.M., Ph.D.

 

Dr. Cowgill received his DVM degree from the University of California at Davis and completed his internship and residency training at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a National Institutes of Health Special Research Fellow at the Renal and Electrolyte Section of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and earned a PhD in Comparative Medical Sciences. He is Board Certified in Small Animal Internal Medicine and is Associate Dean for Southern California Clinical Programs, Co-Director of the UC Veterinary Medical Center-San Diego (UCVMC-SD), and Professor in the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology. He oversees the Clinical Nephrology programs and the Companion Animal Hemodialysis Units at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at Davis and the UCVMC-SD. Dr. Cowgill has more than 35 years of experience in veterinary internal medicine, nephrology, and teaching and has trained many of the leading veterinary nephrologists throughout the world. He is a pioneer in the application of hemodialysis in companion and remains a leading authority in the development of blood purification therapies for renal diseases in animals and people.

 

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Charles J. Fisher, Jr., M.D.

 

Dr. Fisher, founder & CEO of Margaux Biologics, Inc., is a physician scientist with a distinguished career in both academia and industry spanning over 30 years.  Prior to joining industry, Dr. Fisher served as Professor and Head of Critical Care Medicine at The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and has held professor, division chief and director positions at the University of California at Davis Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University and The Cleveland Clinic Foundation.  His research in sepsis, host defense and endothelial dysfunction led to his assisting in the founding of Incyte, and his later recruitment to Eli Lilly & Co, where he led the Xigris (activated Protein C) Global Product Team and successfully registered the first drug approved for the treatment of sepsis.  He was recruited to Abbott Laboratories as Vice President for Global Pharmaceutical Development and, among other accomplishments, led the registration of Humira (first fully humanized anti-TNF mab).  Other medical firsts include his contributions to the development of, and later approval of, sTNF:fc (Enbrel, 1st soluble anti-TNF tx) and IL-1ra (Kinneret, 1st anti-IL-1 tx).  Dr. Fisher has numerous patents and publications to his credit.  Prior to founding Margaux Biologics, he was Chief Medical Officer and Executive Vice President of Cardiome Pharma Corp. where he led the team that invented, developed, registered and sold to Merck ($800M) vernakalant, a novel, first in class, multi-ion channel drug for atrial fibrillation (Brinavess).

 

 

Additionally, Dr. Fisher is a decorated, multi tour combat veteran, with extensive military experience in special operations.  He is a Life Member of the Special Operations Medical Association (SOMA), has served as a member of the Defense Science Research Council and on DARPA panels, including one focused on universal host defense. His unique background of direct patient care, basic and clinical research, on the ground combat experience, and leadership at all levels, has led to an exemplary track record of building teams, delivering results, medical firsts and saving lives.

 

Geert Schmid-Schцnbein, Ph.D.

 

Dr. Schmid-Schonbein is Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering, Adjunct Professor in Medicine at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and director of the UCSD Microcirculation Laboratory where he and his team are studying organ injury mechanisms, apoptosis in hypertension, and triggers for inflammation in the blood circulation.  Dr. Schmid-Schonbein earned his Ph.D. in bioengineering from UCSD in 1976. After a three-year post-doctoral fellowship at Columbia University, he returned to UCSD in 1979 as an assistant professor.  Some of Dr. Schmid-Schonbein's early research discoveries involved the behavior of infection-fighting white blood cells. Using engineering techniques, he made the first determination of the force with which white blood cells adhere to the walls of blood vessels as part of the initial process of inflammation. Later, Dr. Schmid-Schonbein concluded that the survival of an acutely ill patient can hinge on the degree to which white blood cells are activated. Recently his group discovered a mechanism that leads to activation of white blood cells, which is due to digestive enzymes and may cause cardiovascular disease. Among his many distinctions, Dr. Schmid-Schonbein is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Heart Association. He is a founding fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and winner of the Melville Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineering.

 

CANCER ADVISORY BOARD

 

Dr. Radvanyi received his Ph.D. in clinical biochemistry from the University of Toronto.  His main research area is tumor immunology studying immune regulation in cancer and identifying new antigens as targets for anti-cancer T-cell therapy.  After completing postdoctoral work in Toronto and at Harvard University in Boston at the Joslin Diabetes Center, Dr. Radvanyi joined the Immunology Group at Sanofi-Pasteur in Toronto in 2000 as a Senior Scientist where he helped lead an antigen discovery program that led to the discovery of a group of over-expressed breast cancer-specific genes that are candidates for antigen-specific vaccines against breast cancer. In 2005, Dr. Radvanyi joined the faculty of the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he also holds the additional appointment as Associate Professor, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine.

 

INVOLVEMENT IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

 

To the best of our knowledge, during the past ten years, none of the following occurred with respect to a present or former director or executive officer of the Company: (1) any bankruptcy petition filed by or against such person or any business of which such person was a general partner or executive officer either at the time of the bankruptcy or within two years prior to that time; (2) any conviction in a criminal proceeding or being subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses); (3) being subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of any competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting his involvement in any type of business, securities or banking activities; (4) being found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the SEC or the Commodities Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated; and (5) being the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, relating to an alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies or law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or (6) being the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or associated persons.

 

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CODE OF ETHICS.

 

On February 23, 2005, the Board of Directors approved a "Code of Business Conduct and Ethics,” which applies to our principal executive officer, our principal financial officer, our principal accounting officer and persons performing similar tasks. Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is available on our company website at www.aethlonmedical.com.

 

AUDIT COMMITTEE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

 

Our Board of Directors formed an Audit Committee in May of 1999 (the "Audit Committee"). Mr. Franklyn S. Barry, Jr. (the Chairman of the Audit Committee), Mr. Edward Broenniman and Dr. Chetan S. Shah serve as members of the Committee. The Board of Directors has determined that each of Mr. Broenniman and Mr. Barry is an "audit committee financial expert" as that term is defined by Item 407 of Regulation S-K.

 

The Audit Committee assists the Board of Directors in its oversight of the quality and integrity of our accounting, auditing, and reporting practices. The Audit Committee's role includes overseeing the work of our internal accounting and financial reporting and auditing processes and discussing with management our processes to manage business and financial risk, and for compliance with significant applicable legal, ethical, and regulatory requirements. The Audit Committee is responsible for the appointment, compensation, retention, and oversight of the independent auditor engaged to prepare or issue audit reports on our financial statements and internal control over financial reporting. The Audit Committee relies on the expertise and knowledge of management in carrying out its oversight responsibilities. The Committee's specific responsibilities are delineated in its charter.

 

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE

 

Our Board of Directors formed a Compensation Committee in May of 1999 (the "Compensation Committee"). Dr. Chetan S. Shah (the Chairman of the Compensation Committee), Mr. Franklyn S. Barry, Jr. and Mr. Edward Broenniman serve as members of the Committee. The Compensation Committee's basic responsibility is to assure that the Chief Executive Officer, other officers, and key management are compensated effectively in a manner consistent with our compensation strategy and competitive practice. In addition, the Compensation Committee is responsible for establishing general compensation guidelines for non-management employees.

 

The Compensation Committee is responsible for overseeing and, as appropriate, making recommendations to the Board regarding the annual salaries and other compensation of our executive officers, our general employee compensation and other policies and providing assistance and recommendations with respect to our compensation policies and practices. The Compensation Committee is authorized to carry out these activities and other actions reasonably related to the Compensation Committee's purposes or assigned by the Board from time to time. The Committee's specific responsibilities are delineated in its charter.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The following executive compensation disclosure reflects all compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to the executive officers below for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and March 31, 2013. The following table summarizes all compensation for fiscal years 2014 and 2013 received by our Chief Executive Officer, and the Company's two most highly compensated executive officers who earned more than $100,000 in fiscal year 2014.

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE FOR 2014 AND 2013 FISCAL YEARS

 

NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND PRINCIPAL POSITION   YEAR    

SALARY

($)

   

BONUS

($)

    STOCK
AWARDS ($)(5)
    OPTION
AWARDS ($)(5)
    NON-
EQUITY
INCENTIVE PLAN
COMPEN-
SATION
($)
    NON- QUALIFIED DEFERRED COMPEN-
SATION
EARNINGS
($)
    ALL
OTHER COMP.
($)
    TOTAL ($)  
                                                                         
James A. Joyce (1)     2014     $ 330,000     $ 70,000     $       –     $ 180,000     $          –     $               $            $ 580,000  
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER     2013     $ 325,000     $ 12,500     $     $     $     $     $     $ 337,500  
                                                                         
Richard H. Tullis, PhD (2)     2014     $ 195,000     $ --     $     $ 45,000     $     $     $     $ 240,000  
VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF SCIENCE OFFICER     2013     $ 195,000     $ 10,000     $     $     $     $     $     $ 205,000  
                                                                         
James B. Frakes (3)     2014     $ 180,000     $ 3,000     $     $ 45,000     $     $     $     $ 228,000  
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER AND SVP-FINANCE     2013     $ 180,000     $ 7,500     $     $     $     $     $     $ 187,500  
                                                                         
Rodney S. Kenley (4)     2014     $ 240,000     $ --     $     $ 45,000     $     $     $     $ 285,000  
PRESIDENT     2013     $ 240,000     $ 10,000     $     $     $     $     $     $ 250,000  

 

51
 

 

(1) The aggregate number of stock awards and stock option awards issued to Mr. Joyce and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 is 3,400,000 (see share restricted stock grant below) and 14,088,243, respectively. Mr. Joyce received a $5,000 salary increase from $325,000 to $330,000 effective July 1, 2013. In June, 2014, Mr. Joyce received a $20,000 salary increase from $330,000 to $350,000.

 

Mr. Joyce was granted 4,000,000 shares of restricted common stock, at a price per share of $0.24, which vested in equal installments over a thirty-six month period that commenced on June 30, 2010. Mr. Joyce has accepted all 4,000,000 shares of the grant and all such shares have vested. However, 600,000 shares previously accepted by Mr. Joyce were pledged as collateral for a loan and have been retained and/or sold by the lender and are no longer owned by Mr. Joyce.

 

(2) The aggregate number of stock awards and stock option awards issued to Dr. Tullis and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 is zero and 3,117,175, respectively.

 

(3) Mr. Frakes was appointed as Chief Financial Officer on September 27, 2010 after previously serving as Senior Vice President-Finance on a part-time basis.  The aggregate number of stock awards and stock option awards outstanding as of March 31, 2014 is zero and 1,000,000, respectively. In June 2014, Mr. Frakes received a $30,000 salary increase from $180,000 to $210,000.

 

(4) Mr. Kenley was appointed President on October 27, 2011.  The aggregate number of stock awards and stock option awards issued to Mr. Kenley and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 is zero and 1,500,000, respectively. In June, 2014, Mr. Kenley received a $20,000 salary increase from $240,000 to $260,000.

 

(5) See note 6 to our financial statements regarding the assumptions made in valuing the stock/option awards in the above table.

 

EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENTS

 

We entered into an employment agreement with Mr. Joyce effective April 1, 1999. Effective June 1, 2001, Mr. Joyce was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer and his base annual salary was increased from $120,000 to $180,000. Effective January 1, 2005, Mr. Joyce's salary was increased from $180,000 to $205,000 per year. Under the terms of the agreement, his employment continues at a salary of $205,000 per year for successive one-year periods, unless given notice of termination 60 days prior to the anniversary of his employment agreement. Effective April 1, 2006. Mr. Joyce's salary was increased from $205,000 to $240,000. His salary was subsequently increased to $265,000 per year and effective May 1, 2008, his salary was increased from $265,000 to $290,000 per year. Effective April 1, 2010, his salary was increased from $290,000 to $325,000 per year. Effective July 2013, his salary was increased from $325,000 to $330,000 per year. In June 2014, his salary was increased from $330,000 to $350,000 per year.

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, Mr. Joyce earned a bonus of $50,000 from Aethlon that was paid to him in April 2014 and bonuses of $20,000 from ESI. All of those bonuses were based upon targets established by our compensation committee.

 

We entered into an employment agreement with Dr. Tullis effective January 10, 2000. Effective June 1, 2001, Dr. Tullis was appointed our Chief Science Officer of the Company. His compensation under the agreement was modified in June 2001 from $80,000 to $150,000 per year. Effective January 1, 2005, Dr. Tullis' salary was increased from $150,000 to $165,000 per year. Under the terms of the agreement, his employment continues at a salary of $165,000 per year for successive one-year periods, unless given notice of termination 60 days prior to the anniversary of his employment agreement. Dr. Tullis was granted 250,000 stock options to purchase our common stock in connection the completing certain milestones, such as the initiation and completion of certain clinical trials, the submission of proposals to the FDA and the filing of a patent application. Effective April 1, 2006, Dr. Tullis salary was increased to $180,000 per year. Effective April 1, 2010, his salary was increased from $180,000 to $195,000 per year.

 

Both Mr. Joyce's and Dr. Tullis' agreements provide for medical insurance and disability benefits, one year of severance pay if their employment is terminated by us without cause or due to change in our control before the expiration of their agreements, and allow for bonus compensation and stock option grants as determined by our Board of Directors. Both agreements also contain restrictive covenants preventing competition with us and the use of confidential business information, except in connection with the performance of their duties for the Company, for a period of two years following the termination of their employment with us.

 

On September 27, 2010, Mr. Frakes was appointed our Chief Financial Officer. We have not entered into a written employment agreement with Mr. Frakes. As Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Frakes receives an annual salary of $180,000 and medical insurance benefits. In June 2014, his salary was increased from $180,000 to $210,000 per year. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, Mr. Frakes earned a bonus of $3,000 from ESI based upon targets established by our compensation committee.

 

Mr. Kenley was appointed our President on October 27, 2010. Pursuant to a written offer of employment executed by us and Mr. Kenley, he receives an annual salary of $240,000 and medical insurance benefits. In June 2014, his salary was increased from $240,000 to $260,000 per year.

 

52
 

 

OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT 2014 FISCAL YEAR-END

 

The following table sets forth certain information concerning stock option awards granted to our named executive officers.

 

OUTSTANDING EQUITY AWARDS AT 2014 FISCAL YEAR END

 

  OPTIONS AWARDS
NAME

NUMBER OF

SECURITIES

UNDERLYING

UNEXERCISED

OPTIONS

EXERCISABLE

(#)

NUMBER OF

SECURITIES

UNDERLYING

UNEXERCISED

OPTIONS

UNEXERCISABLE

(#)

EQUITY

INCENTIVE PLAN AWARDS

NUMBER OF

SECURITIES

UNDERLYING

UNEXERCISED

UNEARNED

OPTIONS

UNEXERCISABLE

(#)

OPTION

EXERCISE

PRICE

($)

DATE OF

OPTION

EXPIRATION

James A. Joyce 1,115,550(1) $0.38 02/23/15
  557,775(1) $0.38 02/23/15
  557,775(1) $0.38 02/23/15
  2,857,143(1) $0.21 12/18/15
  2,500,000(2) $0.36 09/21/17
  2,000,000(3) $0.25 02/21/19
  2,500,000(4) -- $0.25 09/27/20
  –(5) 2,000,000 $0.10 07/01/23
           
           
Richard H. Tullis 433,588(6) $0.38 02/23/15
  433,587(6) $0.38 02/23/15
  750,000(7) $0.41 06/14/18
  1,000,000(8) $0.25 09/27/20
  –(5) 500,000 $0.10 07/01/23
           
           
James B. Frakes 500,000(9) $0.25 09/27/20
  –(5) 500,000 $0.10 07/01/23
           
Rodney S. Kenley 854,157(10) 145,843 $0.25 10/27/20
  –(5) 500,000 $0.10 7/01/23

 

(1) This option was fully vested as of March 31, 2010 and as a result of the Option Suspension Agreement, the expiration date was extended by 100 days. Subsequent to March 31, 2010, the expiration date of this option was extended to February 23, 2015 (see Item 13 to the Financial Statements).

 

(2) The option vested 1,000,000 shares at grant, with 500,000 shares vesting each annual anniversary date through June 13, 2010 and as a result of the Option Suspension Agreement, the expiration date was extended by 100 days.

 

(3) The option vested 1,000,000 at grant, with 500,000 shares vesting on December 31, 2009 and December 31, 2010 and as a result of the Option Suspension Agreement, the expiration date was extended by 100 days.

 

(4) The option vested 1,000,000 at grant, with 500,000 vesting on each anniversary date through September 27, 2013.

 

(5) This option vests ratably on July 1, 2014, July 1, 2015 and July 1, 2016.

 

(6) This option was fully vested as of March 31, 2010. Subsequent to March 31, 2010, the expiration date of this option was extended to February 23, 2015 (see Item 13 to the Financial Statements).

 

(7) This option was fully vested as of December 15, 2011.

 

(8) The option was fully vested as of September 27, 2011.

 

(9) The option was fully vested as of September 27, 2011.

 

(10) The option vested 250,000 on October 27, 2011 and the remaining 750,000 vests over the 36 months following that date.

 

53
 

 

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION FOR 2014 FISCAL YEAR

 

The following director compensation disclosure reflects all compensation awarded to, earned by or paid to the directors below for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

 

   

 

Fees Earned

or Paid in Cash

($)

   

Stock

Awards

($)

   

Option

Awards

($)

   

Non-Equity

Incentive

Plan

Compensation

($)

   

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

($)

   

All

Other

Compensation

($)

   

Total

($)

 
James A. Joyce (1)           –     $             –             –                   
Richard H. Tullis (2)           $                        
Rodney S. Kenley (3)             $                        
Edward G. Broenniman (4)   15,000           $ 93,902                       108,902  
Franklyn S. Barry, Jr. (5)   15,500           $ 93,902                       109,402  
Chetan S. Shah, MD (6)   14,000           $ 82,725                       96,725  
Phillip A. Ward (7)   11,000           $ 40,244                       51,244  
Thomas V. Wornham (8)   10,000           $ 40,244                       50,244  

 

(1) All compensation received by Mr. Joyce in fiscal year 2014 is disclosed in the Summary Compensation Table above. Mr. Joyce received no compensation as a director in fiscal year 2014.

 

(2) All compensation received by Dr. Tullis in fiscal year 2014 is disclosed in the Summary Compensation Table above. Dr. Tullis received no compensation as a director in fiscal year 2014.

 

(3) All compensation received by Mr. Kenley in fiscal year 2014 is disclosed in the Summary Compensation Table above. Mr. Kenley received no compensation as a director in fiscal year 2014.

 

(4) The aggregate number of stock awards and options awards issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 are 0 and 2,296,080. Mr. Broenniman received a stock option grant of 426,829 shares on March 14, 2014 for his service as an outside director and also received a stock option grant of 460,526 shares on July 24, 2012 for his service as an outside director. The 2014 option vested all 426,829 shares at grant and the 2012 option vested 198,026 at grant, with 262,500 vesting in the June 2013 quarter.

 

(5) The aggregate number of stock awards and options awards issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 are 0 and 2,151,905. Mr. Barry received a stock option grant of 426,829 shares on March 14, 2014 for his service as an outside director and also received a stock option grant of 460,526 shares on July 24, 2012 for his service as an outside director. The 2014 option vested all 426,829 shares at grant and the 2012 option vested 198,026 at grant, with 262,500 vesting in the June 2013 quarter.

 

(6) The aggregate number of stock awards and options awards issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 are 0 and 376,024. Dr. Shah received a stock option grant of 376,024 shares on July 24, 2012 for his service as an outside director. The 2014 option vested all 376,024 shares at grant.

 

(7) The aggregate number of stock awards and options awards issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 are 0 and 555,953. Mr. Ward received a stock option grant of 182,927 shares on March 14, 2014 for his service as an outside director and also received a stock option grant of 373,026 shares on July 24, 2012 for his service as an outside director. The 2014 option vested all 182,927 shares at grant and the 2012 option vested 198,026 at grant, with 175,000 vesting in the June 2013 quarter. Mr. Ward resigned from his position as a director of the Company on January 9, 2014.

 

(8) The aggregate number of stock awards and options awards issued and outstanding as of March 31, 2014 are 0 and 373,026. Mr. Wornham received a stock option grant of 182,927 shares on March 14, 2014 for his service as an outside director and also received a stock option grant of 373,026 shares on July 24, 2012 for his service as an outside director. The 2014 option vested all 182,927 shares at grant and the 2012 option vested 198,026 at grant, with 175,000 vesting in the June 2013 quarter. Mr. Wornham exercised the 2014 stock option in full prior to March 31, 2014.  Mr. Wornham resigned from his position as a director of the Company on January 9, 2014.

 

Directors Compensation Program

 

In July 2012, our Board of Directors approved a new Board Compensation Program (the “New Program” or the “2012 Program”), which modifies and supersedes the 2005 Directors Compensation Program (the “2005 Program”) that was previously in effect. Under the New Program, in which only non-employee Directors may participate, an eligible Director will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of ten year options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. In addition, under the New Program eligible Directors will receive cash compensation equal to $500 for each committee meeting attended and $1,000 for each formal Board meeting attended.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our four outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,667,105 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.076 per share.

 

In the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, our Board of Directors granted under the New Program, to our five outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,595,536 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.082 per share.

 

54
 

 

At March 31, 2014 under the 2005 Directors Compensation Program we had issued 1,337,825 options to outside directors and 3,965,450 options to employee-directors, 514,550 outside directors’ options had been forfeited, 250,000 outside directors’ options had been exercised and 3,671,550 options remained outstanding.

 

On June 6, 2014, our Board of Directors approved certain changes to the New Program. Under the modified New Program, a new eligible Director will receive an initial grant of $50,000 worth of options to acquire shares of Common Stock, with such grant being valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. These options will have a term of ten years and will vest 1/3 upon grant and 1/3 upon each of the first two anniversaries of the date of grant. In addition, at the beginning of each fiscal year, each existing Director eligible to participate in the modified New Program also will receive a grant of $35,000 worth of options valued at the exercise price based on the average of the closing bid prices of the Common Stock for the five trading days preceding the first day of the fiscal year. Such options will vest on the first anniversary of the date of grant. In lieu of per meeting fees, under the modified New Program eligible Directors will receive an annual Board retainer fee of $30,000. The modified New Program also provides for the following annual retainer fees: Audit Committee Chair - $5,000, Compensation Committee chair - $5,000, Audit Committee member - $4,000, Compensation Committee member - $4,000 and Lead independent director - $15,000.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

The following table sets forth information as of July 9, 2014, with respect to the ownership of our common stock, by (i) each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than five percent (5%) of the outstanding shares of each class of our capital stock, (ii) each of our directors and director nominees (if any), (iii) each of our named executive officers and (iv) all of our executive officers and directors as a group. The term "executive officer" is defined as the President/Chief Executive Officer, Secretary, Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer, any vice-president in charge of a principal business function (such as administration or finance), or any other person who performs similar policy making functions for the Company. We believe that each individual or entity named has sole investment and voting power with respect to shares of common stock indicated as beneficially owned by them, subject to community property laws where applicable, excepted where otherwise noted:

 

TITLE OF CLASS NAME AND ADDRESS AMOUNT AND NATURE OF
BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP (1)(2)

PERCENT OF

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP

Common Stock

James A. Joyce, Chief Executive Officer and Director

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

16,888,243 shares (3) 6.3%
Common Stock

Richard H. Tullis, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer and Director

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

3,277,592 shares (4) 1.3%
Common Stock

Rodney S. Kenley, President and Director

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

1,186,863 shares (5) *
Common Stock

James B. Frakes, Chief Financial Officer

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

718,333 shares (6) *
Common Stock

Franklyn S. Barry, Jr., Director

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

2,257,998 shares (7) *
Common Stock

Edward G. Broenniman, Director

8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660

San Diego, CA 92122

2,578,254 shares (8) 1.0%
Common Stock Chetan Shah, MD, Director
8910 University Center Lane, Suite 660
San Diego, CA 92122
16,785,115 shares (9) 6.4%
Common Stock

Ellen R Weiner Family Revocable Trust (12)

10645 N. Tatum Blvd., Suite 200-166

Phoenix, AZ 85028

42,133,513 shares (10) 15.0%
Common Stock

Estate of Allen S. Bird

9960 West Cheyenne Avenue, Suite 110

Las Vegas, NV 89129

14,462,762 shares (10) 5.5%
Common Stock

Alpha Capital Anstalt (12)

c/o LH Financial Services Corp.

150 Central Park South, 2nd Floor

New York, NY 10019

13,160,419 shares (11) 4.99%
Common Stock All Current Directors and Executive Officers as a Group (7 members) 43,692,398 shares 15.4% 

 

55
 

 

*  Less than 1%

 

(1) Based on 253,395,651 shares of Common Stock outstanding on the transfer records of the Company as of July 9, 2014.

 

(2) Calculated pursuant to Rule 13d-3(d)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Under Rule 13d-3(d)(1), shares not outstanding that are subject to options, warrants, rights or conversion privileges exercisable by a person within 60 days are deemed outstanding for the purpose of calculating the number and percentage owned by such person but not deemed outstanding for the purpose of calculating the percentage owned by each other person listed. Except where otherwise noted, the Company believes that each individual or entity named has sole investment and voting power with respect to the shares of Common Stock indicated as beneficially owned by such person, subject to community property laws, where applicable.

 

(3) Includes 2,231,100 stock options exercisable at $0.38 per-share, 2,857,143 stock options exercisable at $0.21 per share, 2,500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.36 per share, 4,500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share, 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.10 per share and 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.19 per share.

 

(4) Includes 867,175 stock options exercisable at $0.38 per share, 750,000 stock options exercisable at $0.41 per share, 1,000,000stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share 125,000 stock options exercisable at $0.10 per share and 16,667 stock options exercisable at $0.19 per share.

 

(5) Includes 958,530 stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share, 125,000 stock options exercisable at $0.10 per share and 83,333 stock options exercisable at $0.19 per share.

 

(6) Includes 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share, 125,000 stock options exercisable at $0.10 per share and 83,333 stock options exercisable at $0.19 per share.

 

(7) Includes 264,550 stock options exercisable at $0.38 per share, 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.41 per share, 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share. 460,526 stock options exercisable at $0.076 per share and 426,829 stock options exercisable at $0.082 per share. 

 

(8) Includes 308,725 stock options exercisable at $0.38 per share, 500,000 stock options exercisable at $0.41 per share, 600,000 stock options exercisable at $0.25 per share, 460,526 stock options exercisable at $0.076 per share and 426,829 stock options exercisable at $0.082 per share. 

 

(9) Includes warrants to purchase 5,386,364 shares of common stock at exercise prices ranging from $0.093 per share to $0.132 per share and 376,024 stock options exercisable at $0.082 per share.

 

(10) Includes warrants held by the Ellen R. Weiner Family Revocable Trust (the "Trust") and all shares issuable upon conversion of a convertible note and exercise of warrants held by the Estate of Allan S. Bird (the "Estate"). The Trust has 15,976,643 warrants to purchase common shares at prices ranging from $0.042 to $0.108 per share. The Estate owns a convertible promissory note in the principal amount of $225,000 convertible into 5,357,143 shares at $0.042 per share and 5,154,916 warrants to purchase common shares at prices ranging from $0.042 to $0.108 per share. Mr. Bird was Ms. Weiner's father-in-law. The Ellen R. Weiner Family Trust disclaims any beneficial ownership of the Estate's note, associated warrants and underlying common stock. The Estate of Mr. Bird disclaims any beneficial ownership of the Trust's warrants and underlying common stock.

 

(11) Includes certain shares issuable upon the conversion of convertible notes and exercise of warrants held by Alpha Capital Anstalt (“Alpha”). Alpha owns a convertible note in the principal amount of $235,200 convertible into 5,600,000 shares of common stock at $0.042 per share and a convertible note in the principal amount of $308,000 convertible into 7,333,333 shares of common stock at $0.042 per share; and warrants to purchase 13,176,071 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.042 per share. Alpha’s beneficial ownership is limited contractually to the extent that exercise of such notes and warrants would cause the aggregate number of shares of common stock beneficially owned by Alpha to exceed 4.99% of our outstanding shares. Accordingly, beneficial ownership for Alpha does not reflect 18,589,419 shares underlying such notes and warrants that would cause the number of shares beneficially owned by Alpha to be 10.4% of our outstanding shares.

 

56
 

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

 

The following describes all transactions since April 1, 2012, and all proposed transactions, in which the Company was or is to be a participant and the amount involved exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of the Company's total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

On March 14, 2014, our Board of Directors granted, to our three outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,595,536 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.082 per share.

 

On July 24, 2012, our Board of Directors granted, to our four outside directors, ten year options to acquire an aggregate of 1,667,105 shares of our common stock, all with an exercise price of $0.076 per share.

 

On June 26, 2012, prior to joining our Board of Directors, Mr. Wornham, now a former director of the Company, purchased $10,000 of units (the "Units" and each a "Unit"), with each Unit consisting of (i) one share of Common Stock at a price per share of $0.072 and (ii) a warrant to purchase such number of shares of Common Stock as shall equal (a) fifty percent of the Subscription Amount divided by (b) $0.072 (the "Warrant Shares") at an exercise price of $0.107 per Warrant Share.

 

Between March 2012 and June 2013, Dr. Shah participated in several private equity placements under which he invested an aggregate amount of $625,556 into Aethlon Medical and in return received 8.5 million restricted shares of our Common Stock and seven year warrants to purchase 4,250,000 shares of our Common Stock.

 

In June 2013, we borrowed $80,000 at a 10% interest rate from Mr. Ward, a former director of the Company. We repaid that loan and paid accrued interest of $133 to Mr. Ward in June 2013.

 

In July 2013, we borrowed $400,000 from Mr. Ward and Dr. Shah under 90 day notes bearing 10% interest (the “Notes”). If we did not pay back those loans by October 9, 2013, then the notes will bear interest at a penalty rate of 12% and the noteholders would have the right at their discretion (i) to convert their principal and accrued interest into shares of common stock at $0.088 per share (the “Conversion Price”) and (ii) receive warrants to purchase common stock equal to 50% of the principal converted under the Notes, with an exercise price of $0.132 per share. We subsequently repaid Mr. Ward’s note in cash. That repayment extinguished all potential common stock and warrant issuance provisions of Mr. Ward’s note. Following the repayment of Mr. Ward’s note, we have reserved 3,465,909 shares of common stock to support the conversion in full of the remaining Note in favor of Dr. Shah and accrued interest as well as the exercise in full of the warrants (should such conversion and/or issuance occur). These securities are not reflected in the Beneficial Ownership Table (Item 12 above) since Dr. Shah does not have the right under the terms of the Notes to acquire common stock or common stock warrants within sixty days of the date of issuance of the Note. 

 

Prior to being named to our Board of Directors, in June 2013, along with two other accredited investors, Dr. Shah invested through a unit subscription agreement under which he purchased $54,000 of units (the "Units" and each a "Unit"), with each Unit consisting of (i) one share of common stock at a price per share of $0.081 and (ii) a warrant to purchase such number of shares of common stock as shall equal (a) fifty percent of the subscription amount divided by (b) $0.081 (the "Warrant Shares") at an exercise price of $0.121 per Warrant Share. This resulted in the issuance to Dr. Shah of 666,667 shares of common stock and warrants to acquire up to 333,333 Warrant Shares.

 

Director Independence

 

Each of Mr. Barry, Mr. Broenniman and Dr. Shah is an independent director as that term is defined by NYSE Rule 303A.02(a). The Company currently has a compensation and audit committee. Of the members of the Company's Board of Directors, each of Mr. Barry, Mr. Broenniman and Dr. Shah meets the NYSE's independence standards for members of such committees.

 

57
 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table presents fees for professional services billed by Squar, Milner, Peterson, Miranda & Williamson, LLP ("Squar Milner") for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

   Fiscal Year   Fiscal Year 
   2014   2013 
           
Audit Fees (1)  $97,000   $104,032 
Audit Related Fees (2)       5,774 
Tax Fees (3)   4,500    3,850 
All Other Fees (4)        
   $101,500   $113,656 

 

(1) Audit Fees include fees and expenses for professional services rendered in connection with the audit of our financial statements for fiscal 2014 and 2013 and for reviews of the financial statements included in each of our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q during fiscal 2014 and 2013.

 

(2) Audit Related Fees consist of fees billed for assurance and related services that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under “Audit Fees.” Included in Audit Related Fees for fiscal 2014 and 2013 are fees and expenses related to reviews of registration statements and SEC filings other than Forms 10-K and 10-Q.

 

(3) Tax Fees include the aggregate fees billed during fiscal year 2014 and 2013 for professional services for preparation of income tax returns.

 

(4) All Other Fees consist of fees paid for products and services other than the services reported above.  No such fees were billed by Squar, Milner, Peterson, Miranda & Williamson, LLP for fiscal 2014 or 2013.

 

POLICY ON AUDIT COMMITTEE PRE-APPROVAL OF AUDIT AND PERMISSIBLE NON-AUDIT SERVICES OF INDEPENDENT AUDITOR

 

Our audit committee of the Board of Directors is responsible for pre-approving all audit, audit-related, tax and other permitted non-audit services to be performed for us by our independent auditor.  The audit committee approved all of the services for which Squar Milner billed us as set forth in the above table.

 

58
 

 

PART IV.

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The following documents are filed as part of this report on Form 10-K:

 

1. Consolidated Financial Statements for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Consolidated Balance Sheets

Consolidated Statements of Operations

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Deficit

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

2. Exhibits

 

2.1 Agreement and Plan of Reorganization Between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Aethlon, Inc. dated March 10, 1999 (1)
   
2.2 Agreement and Plan of Reorganization Between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Hemex, Inc. dated March 10, 1999 (1)
   
3.1 Articles of Incorporation of Aethlon Medical, Inc., as amended (2)
   
3.2 Bylaws of Aethlon Medical, Inc., as amended (3)
   
4.1 Amended and Restated 2003 Consultant Stock Plan (4)
   
4.2 Amended 2010 Stock Incentive Plan (5)
   
4.3 Non-Statutory Stock Option Agreement between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Bruce H. Haglund (50)
   
4.4 Non-Statutory Stock Option Agreement between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Bruce H. Haglund (50)
   
4.5 Non-Statutory Stock Option Agreement between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Alton G. Burkhalter (50)
   
10.1 Employment Agreement between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and James A. Joyce dated April 1, 1999 (6)++
   
10.2 Patent License Agreement by and amongst Aethlon Medical, Inc., Hemex, Inc., Dr. Julian L. Ambrus and Dr. David O. Scamurra (7)
   
10.3 Employment Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Dr. Richard H. Tullis (7)++
   
10.4 Cooperative Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and George Mason University (8)
   
10.5 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and James A Joyce (9)++
   
10.6 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Richard Tullis (9)++
   
10.7 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Franklyn S. Barry, Jr. (9)++
   
10.8 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Ed Broenniman (9)++
   
10.9 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and James A. Joyce(10)++
   
10.10 Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Trustees of Boston University (11)
   
10.11 Stock Option Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and James A. Joyce (12)++
   
10.12 Option Suspension Agreement dated June 29, 2009 (13)++
   
10.13 Form of Class C Common Stock Purchase Warrant (14)
   
10.14 Form of 10% Convertible Note (14)
   
10.15 Stock Option Agreement of James A. Joyce (15)++

 

59
 

 

   
10.16 Stock Option Agreement of Franklyn S. Barry (15)++
   
10.17 Stock Option Agreement of Edward G. Broenniman (15)++
   
10.18 Stock Option Agreement of Richard H. Tullis (15)++
   
10.19 Form of Liquidated Damages Note dated December 30, 2008 (16)
   
10.20 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant (17)
   
10.21 Form of Unit Subscription Agreement (17)
   
10.22 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated July 10, 2009 (18)

 

10.23 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated August 24, 2009 (19)
   
10.24 Office Lease by and between Glenborough Aventine, LLC and Aethlon Medical, Inc. dated September 16, 2009 (20)
   
10.25 Standard Industrial Net Lease by and between Sorrento Business Complex and Aethlon Medical, Inc. dated September 28, 2009 (20)
   
10.26 Form of 10% Convertible Note (21)
   
10.27 Form of Class C Common Stock Purchase Warrant (21)
   
10.28 First Amendment to Lease by and between Glenborough Aventine, LLC and Aethlon Medical, Inc. dated February 1, 2010 (21)
   
10.29 Securities Purchase Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 12, 2010 (21)
   
10.30 Convertible Promissory Note issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 12, 2010 (21)
   
10.31 Warrant to Purchase Common Stock issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 12, 2010 (21)
   
10.32 Secured Promissory Note issued to Aethlon Medical, Inc. by Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 12, 2010 (21)
   
10.33 Form of Amended and Restated 12% Convertible Note (22)
   
10.34 Form of Amended and Restated Warrant (22)
   
10.35 Form of Amended and Restated Warrant (QB) (22)
   
10.36 Form of Amended and Restated Registration Rights Agreement (22)
   
10.37 Note and Warrant Purchase Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Tonaquint, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.38 Secured Convertible Promissory Note issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Tonaquint, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.39 Warrant to Purchase Shares of Common Stock issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Tonaquint, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.40 Buyer Trust Deed Note #1 issued to Aethlon Medical, Inc. by Tonaquint, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.41 Form of Buyer Trust Deed Note #2 dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.42 Trust Deed issued by Tonaquint, Inc. for the benefit of Aethlon Medical, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.43 Escrow Agreement by and among Tonaquint, Inc., Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Griffiths & Turner/GT Title Services, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.44 Deed of Reconveyance executed by Tonaquint, Inc. in favor of Aethlon Medical, Inc. dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.45 Form of Request for Full Reconveyance (23)

 

60
 

 

   
10.46 Irrevocable Instructions to Transfer Agent dated July 15, 2010 (23)
   
10.47 Form of Subscription Agreement dated September 2010 (24)
   
10.48 Form of Class [A/B] Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated September 2010 (24)
   
10.49 Form of Convertible Promissory Note dated September 2010 (24)
   
10.50 Offer of Employment by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Rodney S. Kenley dated October 27, 2010 (25)++
   
10.51 Stock Option Agreement of Rodney S. Kenley dated October 27, 2010 (25)++
   
10.52 Settlement Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated November 22, 2010 (26)
   
10.53 Warrant to Purchase Shares of Common Stock issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated November 22, 2010 (26)
   
10.54 Extension Agreement by and between Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated March 21, 2011 (27)
   
10.55 Amended and Restated Convertible Promissory Note issued by Aethlon Medical, Inc. to Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 15, 2011 (27)
   
10.56 Form of Subscription Agreement dated April 1, 2011 (28)
   
10.57 Form of Convertible Promissory Note dated April 1, 2011 (28)
   
10.58 Form of Class A Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated April 1, 2011 (28)
   
10.59 Form of Class B Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated April 1, 2011 (28)
   
10.60 Termination Agreement dated June 28, 2011 (30)
   
10.61 Unsecured Promissory Note dated June 28, 2011 (30)
   
10.62 Settlement Agreement dated August 15, 2011 (31)
   
10.63 Subscription Agreement dated September 23, 2011 (32)
   
10.64 Form of Convertible Promissory Note dated September 23, 2011 (32)
   
10.65 Form of Class A Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated September 28, 2011 (32)
   
10.66 Subscription Agreement dated November 10, 2011 (33)
   
10.67 Form of 5% OID Unsecured Convertible Debenture dated November 10, 2011 (33)
   
10.68 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated November 10, 2011 (33)
   
10.69 Supplement No. 1 to the Securities Purchase Agreement dated November 2011 (34)
   
10.70 Unit Subscription Agreement dated March 29, 2012 (35)
   
10.71 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated March 29, 2012 (35)
   
10.72 Unit Subscription Agreement dated June 19, 2012 (36)
   
10.73 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated June 19, 2012 (36)
   
10.74 Unit Subscription Agreement dated August 29, 2012 (37)
   
10.75 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated August 29, 2012 (37)

 

61
 

 

   
10.76 Unit Subscription Agreement dated October, November and December 2012 (38)
   
10.77 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated October, November and December 2012 (38)
   
10.78 Form of Convertible Promissory Note dated July 9, 2013 (3)
   
10.79 Unit Subscription Agreement dated June 14, 2013 (39)
   
10.80 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated June 14, 2013 (39)
   
10.81 Form of Unit Purchase Agreement dated October 30, 2013 (40)
   
10.82 Form of Subscription Agreement October 30, 2013 (40)
   
10.83 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant October 30, 2013 (40)
   
10.84 Form of Exosome Sciences 10% Promissory Note dated October 2013 (40)
   
10.85 Form of Unit Purchase Agreement dated November 12, 2013 (41)
   
10.86 Form of Subscription Agreement November 12, 2013 (41)
   
10.87 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant November 12, 2013 (41)
   
10.88 Form of Exosome Sciences Stock Purchase Agreement dated November 21, 2013 (42)
   
10.89 Form of Unit Purchase Agreement dated December 10, 2013 (43)
   
10.90 Form of Subscription Agreement December 10, 2013 (43)
   
10.91 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant December 10, 2013 (43)
   
10.92 Form of Exosome Sciences Stock Purchase Agreement dated December 13, 2013 (44)
   
10.93 Form of Unit Purchase Agreement dated December 30, 2013 (45)
   
10.94 Form of Subscription Agreement December 30, 2013 (45)
   
10.95 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant December 30, 2013 (45)
   
10.96 Settlement Agreement and General Release with Gemini Master Fund, Ltd. dated February 24, 2014 (46)
   
10.97 Escrow Agreement dated February 24, 2014 (46)
   
10.98 Form of Stipulation of Dismissal (46)
   
10.99 Form of Amendment to Notes and Warrants dated March 31, 2014 (47)
   
10.100 Form of Restructuring Agreement dated June 24, 2014 (48)
   
10.101 Form of Restructuring Agreement dated June 24, 2014 (48)
   
10.102 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated June 24, 2014 (48)
   
10.103 Form of Restructuring Agreement dated July 8, 2014 (49)
   
10.104 Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant dated July 8, 2014 (49)

 

62
 

 

   
14 Code of Ethics (29)
   
21 List of subsidiaries (22)

 

23.1 Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (Squar, Milner, Peterson, Miranda & Williamson, LLP) *
   
31.1 Certification of our Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Securities Exchange Act rules 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a) as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.*
   
31.2 Certification of our Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Securities Exchange Act rules 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a) as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.*
   
32.1 Statement of our Chief Executive Officer under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (18 U.S.C. Section 1350)*
   
32.2 Statement of our Chief Financial Officer under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (18 U.S.C. Section 1350)*

 

101.INS XBRL Instance Document*
101.SCH XBRL Schema Document*
101.CAL XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document*
101.DEF XBRL Definition Linkbase Document*
101.LAB XBRL Label Linkbase Document*
101.PRE XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document*

 

* Filed herewith

++ Indicates a management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement

 

(1)   Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 26, 1999 and incorporated by reference.

 

(2)   Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on June 29, 2012 for the year ended March 31, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(3)   Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on July 15, 2013 for the year ended March 31, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(4)   Filed with the Company Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-164939) filed on February 17, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(5)   Filed with the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-182902) filed on July 27, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(6)   Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-KSB filed on July 15, 1999 for the year ended March 31, 1999 and incorporated by reference.

 

(7)   Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-KSB/A filed on September 10, 2004 for the year ended March 31, 2004 and incorporated by reference.

 

(8)   Filed with the Company's Amendment No.2 to Registration Statement on Form SB-2 (File No. 333-117203) filed on October 28, 2004 and incorporated by reference.

  

(9)  Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-KSB filed on July 14, 2005 for the year ended March 31, 2005 and incorporated by reference.

 

(10)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed on September 12, 2005 and incorporated by reference.

 

(11)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 23, 2006 and incorporated by reference.

 

(12)  Filed with the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-168483) filed on August 2, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(13)  Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on July 2, 2009 for the year ended March 31, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(14)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 12, 2008 and incorporated by reference.

 

(15)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 19, 2008 and incorporated by reference.

 

(16)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 2, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(17)  Filed with the Company's Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 20, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

63
 

 

(18)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on August 14, 2009 for the period ended June 30, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(19)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 25, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(20)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 16, 2009 for the period ended September 30, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(21)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on February 16, 2010 for the period ended December 31, 2009 and incorporated by reference.

 

(22)  Filed with the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed on July 2, 2010 for the year ended March 31, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(23)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 16, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(24)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 3, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(25)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 1, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(26)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 26, 2010 and incorporated by reference.

 

(27)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 25, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(28)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 7, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(29)  Filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-KSB filed on July 13, 2007 for the year ended March 31, 2007 and incorporated by reference.

 

(30)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 29, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(31)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on August 22, 2011 for the period ended June 30, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(32)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 28, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(33)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on November 18, 2011 for the period ended September 30, 2011 and incorporated by reference.

 

(34)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 29, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(35)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 6, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(36)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 27, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(37)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 6, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(38)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on February 12, 2013 for the period ended December 31, 2012 and incorporated by reference.

 

(39)  Filed with the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on August 13, 2013 for the period ended June 30, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(40)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 6, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(41)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 20, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(42)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated November 21, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(43)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 16, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(44)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K/A dated December 19, 2013 and incorporated by reference.

 

(45)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 7, 2014 and incorporated by reference.

  

(46)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 27, 2014 and incorporated by reference.

 

(47)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 4, 2014 and incorporated by reference.

 

(48)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 30, 2014 and incorporated by reference.

 

(49)  Filed with the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 10, 2014 and incorporated by reference.

 

(50)  Filed with the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 (File No. 333-49896) filed on November 14, 2000 and incorporated by reference.

64
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, on the 15th day of July, 2014.

     
       
  By: /s/ JAMES A. JOYCE  
    James A. Joyce  
    Chairman, Chief Executive Officer  
       

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature   Title   Date
         
/s/ JAMES A. JOYCE   Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer   July 15, 2014
James A. Joyce        
         
/s/ JAMES B. FRAKES   Chief Financial Officer   July 15, 2014
James B. Frakes        
         
/s/ FRANKLYN S. BARRY, JR.   Director   July 15, 2014
Franklyn S. Barry, Jr.        
         
/s/ EDWARD G. BROENNIMAN   Director   July 15, 2014
Edward G. Broenniman        
         
/s/ RICHARD H. TULLIS   Director   July 15, 2014
Richard H. Tullis        
         
/s/ RODNEY S. KENLEY   Director   July 15, 2014
Rodney S. Kenley        
         
/s/ CHETAN S. SHAH   Director   July 15, 2014
Chetan S. Shah        

 

65
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm F-2
   
Consolidated Balance Sheets F-3
   
Consolidated Statements of Operations F-4
   
Consolidated Statements of Deficit F-5
   
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows F-7
   
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements F-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F-1
 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders

Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary (the "Company") as of March 31, 2014 and 2013 and the related consolidated statements of operations, deficit and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended March 31, 2014. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audits included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall consolidated financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Aethlon Medical, Inc. and Subsidiary as of March 31, 2014 and 2013 and the consolidated results of their operations and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended March 31, 2014 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

As discussed in Note 1, the accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred continuing losses from operations and at March 31, 2014 is in default on certain debt agreements, has negative working capital of approximately $14,169,000 and an accumulated deficit of approximately $74,833,000. A significant amount of additional capital will be necessary to advance the development of the Company's products to the point at which they may become commercially viable. These conditions, among others, raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans regarding these matters are also described in Note 1. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Subsequent to March 31, 2014, as more fully discussed in Note 16, the Company entered into amended debt agreements with certain creditors which resulted in conversion of debt into common stock and the elimination of warrant and convertible debt price protection features. As a result, derivative liabilities of approximately $10,679,000 were reclassified to equity and certain debt holders converted their debt and accrued interest into equity in the approximate amount of $1,235,000.  Due to the significance of such subsequent events, the Company has included an unaudited pro forma balance sheet as of March 31, 2014 alongside its consolidated balance sheets to present the effect of these subsequent events as if they had occurred on March 31, 2014. 

/s/ SQUAR, MILNER, PETERSON, MIRANDA & WILLIAMSON, LLP

 

NEWPORT BEACH, CALIFORNIA

JULY 14, 2014

 

F-2
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

           Pro Forma 
   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013   March 31, 2014
(Note 16)
 
          (unaudited) 
ASSETS               
CURRENT ASSETS               
Cash  $1,250,279   $125,274   $1,250,279 
Accounts receivable   95,177    208,781    95,177 
Deferred financing costs   83,191    863    83,191 
Prepaid expenses   50,699    29,602    50,699 
                
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS   1,479,346    364,520    1,479,346 
                
NON-CURRENT ASSETS               
Property and equipment, net   84,279    145    84,279 
Patents, net   112,489    121,653    112,489 
Deposits   18,988    10,376    18,988 
TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS   215,756    132,174    215,756 
                
TOTAL ASSETS  $1,695,102   $496,694   $1,695,102 
                
LIABILITIES AND DEFICIT          
                
CURRENT LIABILITIES               
Accounts payable  $517,651   $822,832   $517,651 
Due to related parties   839,070    736,070    839,070 
Notes payable   390,000    321,381    390,000 
Convertible notes payable, current portion   1,367,655    2,367,631    482,655 
Derivative liabilities   10,679,067    3,588,239     
Other current liabilities   1,855,374    1,804,985    1,280,124 
                
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES   15,648,817    9,641,138    3,509,500 
                
NONCURRENT LIABILITIES               
Convertible notes payable, noncurrent portion   776,451        1,001,451 
TOTAL NONCURRENT LIABILITIES   776,451        1,001,451 
                
TOTAL LIABILITIES   16,425,268    9,641,138    4,510,951 
                
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 13)               
                
STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT               
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 500,000,000 and 250,000,000 shares authorized at March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively; 224,973,980 and 173,674,201 issued and outstanding at March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively   224,984    173,685    250,994 
Additional paid-in capital   59,659,137    52,157,196    74,116,754 
Accumulated deficit   (74,832,557)   (61,475,325)   (77,401,867)
                
TOTAL AETHLON MEDICAL, INC STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   (14,948,436)   (9,144,444)   (3,034,119)
                
NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS   218,270        218,270 
                
TOTAL DEFICIT   (14,730,166)   (9,144,444)   (2,815,849)
                
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND DEFICIT  $1,695,102   $496,694   $1,695,102 

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

   Years Ended March 31, 
   2014   2013 
REVENUES:          
Government contract revenue  $1,623,769   $1,230,004 
Total revenues   1,623,769    1,230,004 
           
OPERATING EXPENSES          
Professional fees   1,521,397    1,892,270 
Payroll and related   2,227,194    2,166,989 
General and administrative   931,106    746,099 
    4,679,697    4,805,358 
OPERATING LOSS   (3,055,928)   (3,575,354)
           
OTHER (INCOME) EXPENSE          
Loss on debt conversion   40,257    139,839 
Change in fair value of derivative liabilities   8,547,015    44,705 
Loss on litigation settlement   583,601     
Other expenses   (75,060)   (172)
Interest and other debt expenses   1,287,221    1,132,314 
    10,383,034    1,316,686 
           
NET LOSS BEFORE NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS   (13,438,962)   (4,892,040)
           
LOSS ATTRIBUTABLE TO NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS   (81,730)    
           
LOSS ATTRIBUTABLE TO COMMON STOCKHOLDERS  $(13,357,232)  $(4,892,040)
           
Basic and diluted net loss per share available to common stockholders  $(0.07)  $(0.03)
           
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - basic and diluted   194,058,972    149,223,601 

  

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF DEFICIT

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

   ATTRIBUTABLE TO AETHLON MEDICAL, INC.         
   COMMON STOCK   ADDITIONAL PAID IN    ACCUMULATED   NON- CONTROLLING   TOTAL 
   SHARES   AMOUNT   CAPITAL   DEFICIT   INTERESTS   DEFICIT 
BALANCE - MARCH 31, 2012   117,515,892   $117,518   $47,170,146   $(56,583,285)  $           –   $(9,295,621)
                               
Issuance of common stock for cash   29,724,545    29,726    2,080,108            2,109,834 
                               
Issuances of common stock upon conversions of notes payable   21,941,154    21,941    1,673,118            1,695,059 
                               
Issuance of common stock for services   2,896,181    2,896    256,139            259,035 
                               
Patent license fees paid with issuance of common stock   246,429    246    17,004            17,250 
                               
Reclassification of derivative liability into equity           45,081            45,081 
                               
Issuance of common stock for interest   116,000    120    11,726            11,846 
                               
Loss on debt conversion   1,234,000    1,238    138,601            139,839 
                               
Stock-based compensation expense           765,273            765,273 
                               
Net loss               (4,892,040)       (4,892,040)
                               
BALANCE - MARCH 31, 2013   173,674,201   $173,685   $52,157,196   $(61,475,325)  $   $(9,144,444)

  

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF DEFICIT

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

   ATTRIBUTABLE TO AETHLON MEDICAL, INC.         
   COMMON STOCK   ADDITIONAL PAID IN    ACCUMULATED   NON- CONTROLLING   TOTAL 
   SHARES   AMOUNT   CAPITAL   DEFICIT   INTERESTS   DEFICIT 
BALANCE - MARCH 31, 2013   173,674,201   $173,685   $52,157,196   $(61,475,325)  $   $(9,144,444)
                               
Issuances of common stock upon conversions of notes payable   10,574,024    10,572    716,204            726,776 
                               
Issuance of common stock for cash - Aethlon   16,872,739    16,873    1,660,159            1,677,032 
                               
Issuance of common stock for cash - ESI           1,200,000         300,000    1,500,000 
                               
Issuance of common stock for services   3,071,150    3,071    389,022            392,093 
                               
Issuance of common stock under convertible debt restructuring   4,507,105    4,507    851,842            856,349 
                               
Issuance of common stock under stock option  exercises for accrued expenses   158,536    159    12,841            13,000 
                               
Reclassification of derivative liability into equity           1,456,187            1,456,187 
                               
Issuance of common stock under cashless warrant exercises   12,716,225    12,717    (12,717)            
                               
Shares issued under restricted stock grant   3,400,000    3,400    (3,400)            
                               
Issuance of common stock on litigation settlement           583,601            583,601 
                               
Loss on debt conversion           40,256            40,256 
                               
Stock-based compensation expense           607,946            607,946 
                               
Net loss               (13,357,232)   (81,730)   (13,438,962)
                               
BALANCE - MARCH 31, 2014   224,973,980   $224,984   $59,659,137   $(74,832,557)  $218,270   $(14,730,166)

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

   2014   2013 
Cash flows from operating activities:          
Net loss  $(13,438,962)  $(4,892,040)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   21,087    10,484 
Debt restructuring cost   856,349    139,839 
Non-cash interest expense       11,846 
Loss on litigation settlement   583,601     
Change in estimated fair value of derivative liabilities   8,547,015    44,705 
Loss on debt conversion   40,256     
Fair market value of equity instruments issued for services   392,093    259,035 
Stock based compensation   607,946    765,273 
Patent license fees paid with issuance of common stock       17,250 
Amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs   5,147    594,358 
           
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   113,604    191,333 
Prepaid expenses   (21,097)   1,850 
Other assets   (8,612)    
Accounts payable and other current liabilities   46,602    751,210 
Due to related parties   116,000    6,000 
           
Net cash used in operating activities   (2,138,971)   (2,098,857)
           
Cash flows from investing activities:          
Purchases of property and equipment   (96,056)    
           
Net cash used in investing activities   (96,056)    

 

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-7
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

   2014   2013 
Cash flows from financing activities:          
Principal repayments of notes payable   (217,000)   (29,610)
Proceeds from the issuance of notes payable   400,000     
Net proceeds from the issuance of common stock   3,177,032    2,109,834 
           
Net cash provided by financing activities   3,360,032    2,080,224 
           
Net increase (decrease) in cash   1,125,005    (18,633)
           
Cash at beginning of year   125,274    143,907 
           
Cash at end of year  $1,250,279   $125,274 
           
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information - Cash paid during the year for:          
Interest  $13,950   $2,821 
Income taxes  $   $ 
           
Supplement information for non-cash investing and financing activities:          
           
Conversion of debt, accrued liabilities and accrued interest to common stock  $726,776   $1,695,059 
Reclassification of accounts payable to convertible notes payable  $47,000   $ 
Reclassification of accrued interest to convertible notes payable  $20,027   $ 
Recording deferred financing costs associated with notes payable and convertible notes payable  $83,191   $7,500 
Reclassification of warrant derivative liability into equity  $1,456,187   $45,081 
Issuance of shares under cashless warrant exercises  $12,717   $ 
Exercise of stock option for accrued expenses  $13,000   $ 
Reclassification of note payable to convertible notes payable  $   $75,000 
Stock issued under restricted stock grant  $3,400   $ 

  

See accompanying notes to the consolidated financial statements.

 

F-8
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

1. ORGANIZATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

ORGANIZATION

 

Aethlon Medical, Inc. and subsidiary ("Aethlon", the "Company", "we" or "us") is a medical device company focused on creating innovative devices that address unmet medical needs in cancer, infectious disease and other life-threatening conditions. At the core of our developments is the Aethlon ADAPT™ (Adaptive Dialysis-Like Affinity Platform Technology) system, a medical device platform that converges single or multiple affinity drug agents with advanced plasma membrane technology to create therapeutic filtration devices that selectively remove harmful particles from the entire circulatory system without loss of essential blood components. On June 25, 2013, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) that allows us to initiate human feasibility studies of the Aethlon Hemopurifier® in the United States. Under the feasibility study protocol, we will enroll ten end-stage renal disease patients who are infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) to demonstrate the safety of Hemopurifier therapy. Successful completion of this study will allow us the opportunity to initiate pivotal studies that are required for market clearance to treat HCV and other disease conditions in the United States.

 

Successful outcomes of human trials will also be required by the regulatory agencies of certain foreign countries where we intend to sell this device. Some of our patents may expire before FDA approval or approval in a foreign country, if any, is obtained. However, we believe that certain patent applications and/or other patents issued more recently will help protect the proprietary nature of the Hemopurifier(R) treatment technology.

 

In October 2013, our subsidiary, Exosome Sciences, Inc. (“ESI”), commenced operations with a focus on advancing exosome-based strategies to diagnose and monitor the progression of cancer, infectious disease and other life-threatening conditions. 

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB marketplace administered by the OTC Markets Group under the symbol "AEMD."

 

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA BALANCE SHEET INFORMATION

 

During June and July 2014, we entered into agreements with two existing convertible note holders to convert one note into common stock and to extend the second note and to restructure warrants related to the original note issuances removing certain price protection features from such warrants. The transaction resulted in not only the conversion of debt to equity but also the reclassification of such warrants from derivative liabilities to equity. As further explained in Note 16, we have presented an unaudited March 31, 2014 pro forma balance sheet to reflect such transactions as if they had occurred on March 31, 2014.

 

PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Aethlon Medical, Inc. and its majority-owned and controlled subsidiary, ESI. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company classifies the noncontrolling interests in ESI as part of consolidated net loss in the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 and includes the accumulated amount of noncontrolling interests as part of stockholders’ equity. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, ESI was a wholly-owned subsidiary. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, Aethlon Medical, Inc. reduced its ownership percentage to 80% by ESI’s issuance of 300,000 shares of ESI common stock in exchange for cash of $1,500,000.

 

The losses at ESI during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 reduced the noncontrolling interests on our consolidated balance sheet by $81,730 from $300,000 to $218,270 at March 31, 2014.

 

GOING CONCERN

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that we will continue as a going concern, which contemplates, among other things, the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the ordinary course of business. We have incurred continuing losses from operations and at March 31, 2014 are in default on certain debt agreements, have negative working capital of approximately $14,169,000, and an accumulated deficit of approximately $74,833,000. These factors, among other matters, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. A significant amount of additional capital will be necessary to advance the development of our products to the point at which they may become commercially viable. We intend to fund operations, working capital and other cash requirements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2015 through debt and/or equity financing arrangements as well as through revenues and related cash receipts under our government contracts (see Note 11).

 

We are currently addressing our liquidity issue by seeking additional investment capital through private placements of common stock and debt and by applying for additional grants issued by government agencies in the United States. We believe that our cash on hand and funds expected to be received from additional private investment will be sufficient to meet our liquidity needs for fiscal 2015. However, no assurance can be given that we will receive any funds in addition to the funds we have received to date.

 

The successful outcome of future activities cannot be determined at this time and there is no assurance that, if achieved, we will have sufficient funds to execute our intended business plan or generate positive operating results.

 

Subsequent to March 31, 2014, we completed several significant transactions related to our convertible notes (see Note 16).

 

The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments related to this uncertainty and as to the recoverability and classification of asset carrying amounts or the amount and classification of liabilities that might result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

F-9
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES

 

We operate in an industry that is subject to intense competition, government regulation and rapid technological change. Our operations are subject to significant risk and uncertainties including financial, operational, technological, regulatory, and including the potential risk of business failure.

 

USE OF ESTIMATES

 

We prepare our consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP, which requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Significant estimates made by management include, among others, realization of long-lived assets, valuation of derivative liabilities, estimating fair value associated with debt and equity transactions and valuation of deferred tax assets. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

 

Accounting standards define "cash and cash equivalents" as any short-term, highly liquid investment that is both readily convertible to known amounts of cash and so near their maturity that they present insignificant risk of changes in value because of changes in interest rates. For the purpose of financial statement presentation, we consider all highly liquid investment instruments with original maturities of three months or less when purchased, or any investment redeemable without penalty or loss of interest to be cash equivalents.  As of March 31, 2014 and 2013, we had no assets that were classified as cash equivalents.

 

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

The carrying amount of our cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and other current liabilities approximates their estimated fair values due to the short-term maturities of those financial instruments. The carrying amount of the notes payable approximates their fair value due to the short maturity of the notes and since the interest rates approximate current market interest rates for similar instruments. Derivative liabilities recorded in connection with warrants and embedded conversion features of certain convertible notes payable are reported at their estimated fair value, with changes in fair value being reported in results of operations (see Note 10).

 

Management has concluded that it is not practical to determine the estimated fair value of amounts due to related parties because the transactions cannot be assumed to have been consummated at arm's length, the terms are not deemed to be market terms, there are no quoted values available for these instruments, and an independent valuation would not be practicable due to the lack of data regarding similar instruments, if any, and the associated potential costs.

 

Other than our derivative liabilities, we do not have any assets or liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis and, during the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, did not have any assets or liabilities that were measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis except as described in Note 10 under derivative liabilities.

 

CONCENTRATIONS OF CREDIT RISKS

 

Cash is maintained at two financial institutions in checking accounts and related cash management accounts. Accounts at these institutions are secured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC") up to $250,000. Our March 31, 2014 cash balances were approximately $1,000,000 over such insured amount. We do not believe that the Company is exposed to any significant risk with respect to its cash.

 

All of our accounts receivable at March 31, 2014 and 2013 and all of our revenue in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 were directly from the U.S. Department of Defense or from a subcontract under Battelle, which is a prime contractor with the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the related assets, which range from two to five years. Repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred while improvements are capitalized. Upon the sale or retirement of property and equipment, the accounts are relieved of the cost and the related accumulated depreciation with any gain or loss included in the consolidated statements of operations.

 

INCOME TAXES

 

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to the difference between the consolidated financial statements and their respective tax basis. Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of (a) temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts reported for income tax purposes, and (b) tax credit carryforwards. We record a valuation allowance for deferred tax assets when, based on our best estimate of taxable income (if any) in the foreseeable future, it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax assets may not be realized.

 

F-10
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

LONG-LIVED ASSETS

 

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amounts may not be recoverable. If the cost basis of a long-lived asset is greater than the projected future undiscounted net cash flows from such asset, an impairment loss is recognized. We believe no impairment charges were necessary during the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.

 

LOSS PER SHARE

 

Basic loss per share is computed by dividing net income available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period of computation. Diluted loss per share is computed similar to basic loss per share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if potential common shares had been issued, if such additional common shares were dilutive. Since we had net losses for all periods presented, basic and diluted loss per share are the same, and additional potential common shares have been excluded as their effect would be antidilutive.

 

As of March 31, 2014 and 2013, a total of 143,074,602 and 142,701,202 potential common shares, consisting of shares underlying outstanding stock options, warrants and convertible notes payable were excluded as their inclusion would be antidilutive.

 

SEGMENTS

 

Historically, we operated in one segment that was based on our development of therapeutic devices. However in the December 2013 quarter, we initiated the operations of ESI to develop diagnostic tests. As a result, we now operate in two segments, Aethlon for therapeutic applications and ESI for diagnostic applications (See Note 14).

 

DEFERRED FINANCING COSTS

 

Costs related to the issuance of debt are capitalized and amortized to interest expense over the life of the related debt using the effective interest method.  We recorded amortization expense related to our deferred offering costs of $863 and $127,200 during the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

REVENUE RECOGNITION

 

DARPA Contract -- With respect to revenue recognition, we entered into a government contract with DARPA and have recognized revenue of $1,466,482 and $1,230,004 under that contract during the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. We adopted the Milestone method of revenue recognition for the DARPA contract under ASC 605-28 “Revenue Recognition – Milestone Method” and we believe we meet the requirements under ASC 605-28 for reporting contract revenue under the Milestone Method for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.

 

In order to account for this contract, we identify the deliverables included within the contract and evaluate which deliverables represent separate units of accounting based on if certain criteria are met, including whether the delivered element has standalone value to the collaborator. The consideration received is allocated among the separate units of accounting, and the applicable revenue recognition criteria are applied to each of the separate units.

 

A milestone is an event having all of the following characteristics:

 

(1) There is substantive uncertainty at the date the arrangement is entered into that the event will be achieved. A vendor’s assessment that it expects to achieve a milestone does not necessarily mean that there is not substantive uncertainty associated with achieving the milestone.

 

(2) The event can only be achieved based in whole or in part on either: (a) the vendor’s performance; or (b) a specific outcome resulting from the vendor’s performance.

 

(3) If achieved, the event would result in additional payments being due to the vendor.

 

F-11
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

A milestone does not include events for which the occurrence is either: (a) contingent solely upon the passage of time; or (b) the result of a counterparty’s performance.

 

The policy for recognizing deliverable consideration contingent upon achievement of a milestone must be applied consistently to similar deliverables.

 

The assessment of whether a milestone is substantive is performed at the inception of the arrangement. The consideration earned from the achievement of a milestone must meet all of the following for the milestone to be considered substantive:

 

(1) The consideration is commensurate with either: (a) the vendor’s performance to achieve the milestone; or (b) the enhancement of the value of the delivered item or items as a result of a specific outcome resulting from the vendor’s performance to achieve the milestone;

 

(2) The consideration relates solely to past performance; and

 

(3) The consideration is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms (including other potential milestone consideration) within the arrangement.

 

A milestone is not considered substantive if any portion of the associated milestone consideration relates to the remaining deliverables in the unit of accounting (i.e., it does not relate solely to past performance). To recognize the milestone consideration in its entirety as revenue in the period in which the milestone is achieved, the milestone must be substantive in its entirety. Milestone consideration cannot be bifurcated into substantive and nonsubstantive components. In addition, if a portion of the consideration earned from achieving a milestone may be refunded or adjusted based on future performance, the related milestone is not considered substantive.

 

See Note 11 for the additional disclosure information required under ASC 605-28.

 

Battelle Subcontract -- We entered into a subcontract agreement with Battelle Memorial Institute (“Battelle”) in March 2013. Battelle was chosen by DARPA to be the prime contractor on the systems integration portion of the original DARPA contract and we are one of several subcontractors on that systems integration project. The Battelle subcontract is cost-reimbursable under a time and materials basis. We began generating revenues under the subcontract during the three months ended September 30, 2013 and for the fiscal year 2014 recorded revenue of $157,287.

 

Our revenue under this contract is a function of cost reimbursement plus an overhead mark-up for hours devoted to the project by specific employees (with specific hourly rates for those employees). Battelle engages us as needed. Each payment requires approval by the program manager at Battelle.

 

STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

Employee stock options and rights to purchase shares under stock participation plans are accounted for under the fair value method. Accordingly, share-based compensation is measured when all granting activities have been completed, generally the grant date, based on the fair value of the award. The exercise price of options is generally equal to the market price of the Company's common stock (defined as the closing price as quoted on the OTCBB on the date of grant). Compensation cost recognized by the Company includes (a) compensation cost for all equity incentive awards granted prior to April 1, 2006, but not yet vested, based on the grant-date fair value estimated in accordance with the original provisions of the then current accounting standards, and (b) compensation cost for all equity incentive awards granted subsequent to April 1, 2006, based on the grant-date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of subsequent accounting standards. We use a Binomial Lattice option pricing model for estimating fair value of options granted (see Note 6).

 

The following table summarizes share-based compensation expenses relating to shares and options granted and the effect on loss per common share during the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013:

 

   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
Vesting of Stock Options  $541,588   $355,578 
Incremental fair value of option Modifications   1,914    23,028 
Vesting Expense Associated with CEO Restricted Stock Grant   64,444    386,667 
Total Stock-Based Compensation Expense  $607,946   $765,273 
           
Basic and diluted loss per common share  $(0.00)  $(0.01)

 

F-12
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

We account for transactions involving services provided by third parties where we issue equity instruments as part of the total consideration using the fair value of the consideration received (i.e. the value of the goods or services) or the fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. In transactions, when the value of the goods and/or services are not readily determinable and (1) the fair value of the equity instruments is more reliably measurable and (2) the counterparty receives equity instruments in full or partial settlement of the transactions, we use the following methodology:

 

a) For transactions where goods have already been delivered or services rendered, the equity instruments are issued on or about the date the performance is complete (and valued on the date of issuance).

 

b) For transactions where the instruments are issued on a fully vested, non-forfeitable basis, the equity instruments are valued on or about the date of the contract.

 

c) For any transactions not meeting the criteria in (a) or (b) above, we re-measure the consideration at each reporting date based on its then current stock value.

 

We review share-based compensation on a quarterly basis for changes to the estimate of expected award forfeitures based on actual forfeiture experience. The effect of adjusting the forfeiture rate for all expense amortization after March 31, 2006 is recognized in the period the forfeiture estimate is changed. The effect of forfeiture adjustments for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014 was insignificant.

 

PATENTS

 

Patents include both foreign and domestic patents. There were several patents pending at March 31, 2014. We capitalize the cost of patents and patents pending, some of which were acquired, and amortize such costs over the shorter of the remaining legal life or their estimated economic life, upon issuance of the patent. The unamortized costs of patents and patents pending are subject to our review for impairment under our long-lived asset policy above. 

 

STOCK PURCHASE WARRANTS

 

We grant warrants in connection with the issuance of convertible notes payable and the issuance of common stock for cash. When such warrants are classified as equity and issued in connection with debt, we measure the relative estimated fair value of such warrants and record it as a discount from the face amount of the convertible notes payable. Such discounts are amortized to interest expense over the term of the notes using the effective interest method. Warrants issued in connection with common stock for cash, if classified as equity, are considered issued in connection with equity transactions and the warrant fair value is recorded to additional paid-in-capital. Lastly, warrants not meeting equity classification are recorded as derivative instruments.

 

DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS

 

We evaluate free-standing derivative instruments (or embedded derivatives) to properly classify such instruments within equity or as liabilities in our financial statements. Our policy is to settle instruments indexed to our common shares on a first-in-first-out basis.

 

The classification of a derivative instrument is reassessed at each reporting date. If the classification changes as a result of events during a reporting period, the instrument is reclassified as of the date of the event that caused the reclassification. There is no limit on the number of times a contract may be reclassified.

 

Instruments classified as derivative liabilities are remeasured each reporting period (or upon reclassification) and the change in fair value is recorded on our consolidated statement of operations in other (income) expense.

 

BENEFICIAL CONVERSION FEATURE OF CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

The convertible feature of certain notes payable provides for a rate of conversion that is below market value. Such feature is normally characterized as a "Beneficial Conversion Feature" ("BCF"). We measure the estimated fair value of the BCF in circumstances in which the conversion feature is not required to be separated from the host instrument and accounted for separately, and record that value in the consolidated financial statements as a discount from the face amount of the notes. Such discounts are amortized to interest expense over the term of the notes.

 

F-13
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

REGISTRATION PAYMENT ARRANGEMENTS

 

We account for contingent obligations to make future payments or otherwise transfer consideration under a registration payment arrangement separately from any related financing transaction agreements, and any such contingent obligations are recognized only when it is determined that it is probable that the Company will become obligated for future payments and the amount, or range of amounts, of such future payments can be reasonably estimated.

 

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT EXPENSES

 

Our research and development costs are expensed as incurred. We incurred approximately $1,509,000 and $1,440,000 of research and development expenses for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively, which are included in various operating expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.

 

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

 

We have not entered into any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future material effect on our consolidated financial statements.

 

SIGNIFICANT RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Management is evaluating significant recent accounting pronouncements that are not yet effective for the Company, including the new accounting standard on revenue recognition, ASU 2014-09 (Topic 606), and has not yet concluded whether any such pronouncements will have a significant effect on the Company’s future consolidated financial statements.

 

2. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment, net, consist of the following:

 

   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
Furniture and office equipment, at cost  $385,088   $289,031 
Accumulated depreciation   (300,809)   (288,886)
   $84,279   $145 

 

Depreciation expense for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 approximated $12,000 and $1,000, respectively.

   

3. PATENTS

 

Patents consist of the following:

 

   March 31, 2014   March 31, 2013 
Patents  $157,442   $157,442 
Patents pending and trademarks   54,203    54,203 
Accumulated amortization   (99,156)   (89,992)
   $112,489   $121,653 

 

Amortization expense for patents for the years ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 approximated $9,000. Future amortization expense on patents is estimated to be approximately $9,000 per year based on the estimated life of the patents. The weighted average remaining life of our patents is approximately 6.5 years.

 

F-14
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

4. NOTES PAYABLE

 

Notes payable consist of the following:

 

    March 31, 2014     March 31, 2013  
    Principal Balance     Accrued Interest     Principal Balance     Accrued Interest  
12% Notes payable, past due   $ 185,000     $ 353,813     $ 185,000     $ 326,062  
10% Note payable, past due     5,000       6,375       5,000       5,875  
                                 
Directors’ Note(s)     200,000       14,516              
Tonaquint Note                 131,381       1,629  
Total   $ 390,000     $ 374,704     $ 321,381     $ 333,566  

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we recorded interest expense of $59,901 related to the contractual interest rates of our notes payable.

 

12% NOTES

 

From August 1999 through May 2005, we entered into various borrowing arrangements for the issuance of notes payable from private placement offerings (the "12% Notes"). On April 21, 2010, a holder of $100,000 of the 12% Notes converted his principal balance and $71,758 of accrued interest into 687,033 shares of common stock at an agreed conversion price of $0.25 per share. At March 31, 2014, the 12% Notes were past due, in default, and bearing interest at the default rate of 15%.

 

10% NOTES

 

At March 31, 2014, one 10% Note in the amount of $5,000, which is past due and in default, remained outstanding and it bears interest at the default rate of 15%.

 

Management's plans to satisfy the remaining outstanding balance on these 12% and 10% Notes include converting the notes to common stock at market value or repayment with available funds.

 

TONAQUINT NOTE

 

On June 28, 2011, in conjunction with our satisfying all balances owed under a convertible note, we entered into a Termination Agreement with Tonaquint, Inc. under which both parties agreed that in consideration of the termination of a warrant, the waiving of all fees, penalties, the creation of the selling program and other factors, we agreed to issue an unsecured non-convertible promissory note (the "New Note") in the principal amount of $360,186, which provides for annual interest at a rate of 6%, payable monthly in either cash or our stock, at our option. The New Note originally had a maturity date of April 30, 2012. We subsequently extended the note initially to July 31, 2012 and then to July 31, 2013 and subsequently to August 31, 2013. We also recorded into principal $12,500 of the lender’s legal fees related to documentation of the extension agreement.

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we issued 1,540,426 shares of common stock to convert $136,060 of principal and accrued interest (see Note 6). As a result of those conversions, the Tonaquint Note was paid off in full during the September 2013 quarter. We recorded a loss on conversion of $40,256 on those conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014.

 

The following table shows the conversions into principal of the Tonaquint Note by fiscal year:

 

Initial principal balance  $360,186 
Lender’s legal fees   12,500 
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   (241,305)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014   (131,381)
Balance as of March 31, 2014  $ 

 

F-15
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

DIRECTORS’ NOTES

 

In July 2013, we borrowed $400,000 from two of our directors under two 90 day notes for $200,000 each bearing 10% interest (the “Notes”). At the discretion of the holders, if not paid off by October 9, 2013, the noteholders were entitled to (i) convert their principal and accrued interest into shares of common stock at $0.088 per share (the “Conversion Price”) and (ii) receive warrants to purchase common stock equal to 50% of the principal converted under the Notes, with an exercise price of $0.132 per share. Additionally, there was a provision for a penalty interest rate of 12%.

 

That potential conversion price and warrant exercise price were based on the same pricing mechanism that we have used in prior equity unit financings since March 2012 (see Note 6) which are based on 80% of the then current market price of our common stock and with the warrant exercise price based on 120% of the same then current market price. We initially reserved 6,931,818 shares of common stock to support the conversion of the Notes and accrued interest in full as well as the exercise of the warrants in full (should such conversion and/or issuance occur).

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, the principal of $200,000 and accrued interest of $9,367 were paid on one of the notes, which extinguished all potential common stock and warrant issuance provisions related to that Note.

 

The holder of the second Note agreed to extend the expiration date of his Note to July 31, 2014.

 

5. CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

Convertible Notes Payable consisted of the following at March 31, 2014:

 

    Principal     Unamortized
Discount
    Net
Amount
    Accrued
Interest
 
Convertible Notes Payable – Current Portion:                                
Amended and Restated Series A 12% Convertible Notes, past due   $ 885,000     $          –     $ 885,000     $ 575,250  
2008 10% Convertible Notes, past due     25,000             25,000       19,167  
October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes     50,000             50,000       26,097  
April 2010 10% Convertible Note     75,000             75,000       31,438  
July and August 2011 10% Convertible Notes, past due     257,655             257,655       90,256  
Law Firm Note     75,000             75,000       7,604  
  Total – Convertible Notes Payable – Current Portion     1,367,655             1,367,655       749,812  
                                 
Convertible Notes Payable – Non-Current Portion:                                
September 2010 12% Convertible Notes     317,072             317,072       35,034  
April 2011 12% Convertible Notes     448,448             448,448       12,117  
September 2011 12% Convertible Notes     10,931             10,931       --  
  Total – Convertible Notes Payable – Non-Current Portion     776,451             776,451       47,151  
    Total Convertible Notes Payable   $ 2,144,106     $     $ 2,144,106     $ 796,963  

 

There were no discounts remaining on any of our Convertible Notes Payable as of March 31, 2014.

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014, we recorded interest expense of $354,949 related to the contractual interest rates of our convertible notes and interest expense of $4,284 related to the amortization of debt discounts on the convertible notes for a total of $359,233.

 

F-16
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

Convertible Notes Payable consisted of the following at March 31, 2013:

 

    Principal     Unamortized
Discount
    Net
Amount
    Accrued
Interest
 
Amended and Restated Series A 12% Convertible Notes, past due   $ 885,000     $     $ 885,000     $ 398,250  
2008 10% Convertible Notes, past due     25,000             25,000       15,417  
December 2006 10% Convertible Notes, past due     17,000             17,000       15,888  
October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes     50,000       (389 )     49,611       20,000  
April 2010 10% Convertible Note     75,000       (3,895 )     71,105       23,938  
September 2010 10% Convertible Notes, past due     308,100             308,100       52,393  
April 2011 10% Convertible Notes, past due     400,400             400,400       100,100  
July and August 2011 10% Convertible Notes, $257,656 past due     357,655             357,655       68,704  
September 2011 Convertible Notes, past due     178,760             178,760        
Law Firm Note     75,000             75,000       3,854  
Total – Convertible Notes Payable   $ 2,371,915     $ (4,284 )   $ 2,367,631     $ 698,544  

 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, we recorded interest expense of $459,199 related to the contractual interest rates of our convertible notes and interest expense of $467,158 related to the amortization of debt discounts on the convertible notes for a total of $926,357.

 

AMENDED AND RESTATED SERIES A 12% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In June 2010, we entered into Amended and Restated Series A 12% Convertible Promissory Notes (the "Amended and Restated Notes") with the holders of certain promissory notes previously issued by the Company, extending the due date to December 31, 2010 on the aggregate principal balance of $900,000. During the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013, the holders of $15,000 of the Notes converted their principal and related accrued interest into common stock. The balance remaining at March 31, 2014 and 2013 was $885,000 and is past due as of March 31, 2014. Such notes bear a default annual interest rate of 20%.

 

Subsequent to year end on June 24, 2014, we entered into an agreement with the Ellen R. Weiner Family Revocable Trust (the “Trust”), a holder of a Series A 12% Convertible Note (the “Note”), whereby the Trust converted a past due combined principal and interest balance of $1,003,200 (principal of $660,000 and interest of $343,200) into restricted common stock.

 

Additionally, the Trust agreed to waive anti-dilution price protection underlying warrants previously issued to the Trust. Under its agreement, the Trust converted the entire $1,003,200 past due principal and interest balance on the Note

 

In exchange for the Trust’s conversion in full of the Note and accrued interest and for the waivers of anti-dilution price protection in previously issued warrants, we (1) issued five-year warrants to acquire up to 6,809,524 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.042 per share and up to 397,222 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $.108 per share (collectively, the “Conversion Securities”); (2) issued 75,000 restricted shares of common stock as a service fee; (3) changed the exercise price of all of the previously issued warrants to the Trust to $.042 per share; and (4) extended the expiration date of all of the previously issued warrants to the Trust to July 1, 2018.

 

We continue to hold discussions with the holder of the remaining note in this grouping regarding either an extension to the note or a conversion of the note but there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so on terms that we deem acceptable or at all. We are recording interest at the default rate of 20% on the remaining note.

 

DECEMBER 2006 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In January 2014, we paid off the remaining balance of the December 2006 10% Convertible Notes and the related accrued interest balance with a cash payment of $35,055. Such payment represented the sum of the $17,000 in principal balance and $18,055 in accrued interest.

 

F-17
 

  

2008 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

One 2008 10% Convertible Note in the amount of $25,000 which matured in January 2010 remained outstanding and past due at March 31, 2014. Such note is convertible into our common stock at $0.50 per share. We are recording interest at the default rate of 15%.

 

OCTOBER & NOVEMBER 2009 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In October and November 2009, we raised $430,000 from the sale to accredited investors of 10% convertible notes ("October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes"). The October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes matured at various dates between April 2011 and May 2011 and are convertible into our common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.25 per share. The investors also received matching three year warrants to purchase unregistered shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.25 per share. We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a 100% discount against the principal of the notes. Such discount was fully amortized at March 31, 2014.

 

In July 2012, we issued 461,409 shares of common stock and 230,705 warrants to purchase common stock to the holder of a $25,000 note in this grouping in exchange for the conversion of such note and related accrued interest of $8,000 (for a total of $33,000). The warrants expired in 2012 and are exercisable at $0.107 per share (see Note 6). We recorded a loss on conversion of $45,796.

 

The following table shows the conversions into principal of the October and November 2009 Convertible Notes by fiscal year:

 

Activity in October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance   $ 450,250  
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2010     (70,000 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2011     (175,000 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012     (130,250 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013     (25,000 )
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014     --  
Balance as of March 31, 2014   $ 50,000  

 

On March 31, 2012, we agreed to extend the expiration date and to change the exercise price of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. We recorded a charge of $77,265 relating to this modification.

 

In September 2013, we agreed to extend the expiration date of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. Management assessed the change in the value of the notes and related warrants before and after that extension and determined that the change in value related to the change in terms was not significant.

 

APRIL 2010 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTE

 

In April 2010, we raised $75,000 from the sale to an accredited investor of a 10% convertible note. The convertible note was originally scheduled to mature in October 2011 and is convertible into our common stock at a fixed conversion price of $0.25 per share prior to maturity. The investor also received three year warrants to purchase 300,000 unregistered shares of our common stock at a price of $0.25 per share.

 

We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a 100% discount against the principal of the notes. We amortized this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the note. As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the April 2010 10% Convertible Note.

 

On March 31, 2012, we agreed to extend the expiration date and to change the exercise price of certain warrants of the note holder by two years in exchange for his extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note by that same two year period.

 

In September 2013, we agreed to extend the expiration date of certain warrants of one of the note holders by two years in exchange for the extension of $50,000 of the October & November 2009 10% Convertible Notes and the $75,000 April 2010 10% Convertible Note (see below) by that same two year period. Management assessed the change in the value of the notes and related warrants before and after that extension and determined that the change in value related to the change in terms was not significant.

 

F-18
 

 

SEPTEMBER 2010 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

On September 3, 2010, we entered into a Subscription Agreement with three accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) providing for the issuance and sale of convertible promissory notes and corresponding warrants in the aggregate principal amount of $1,430,000. The initial closing under the Subscription Agreement resulted in the issuance and sale of (i) convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $743,600, (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 3,718,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.31125 per share, and (iii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 3,718,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.43575 per share. The convertible promissory notes bear interest compounded monthly at the annual rate of ten percent (10%) and mature on April 1, 2016 (see below). The aggregate gross cash proceeds were $650,000, the balance of the principal amount representing a due diligence fee and an original issuance discount. The convertible promissory notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of our common stock at a price per share equal to eighty percent (80%) of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock as reported by Bloomberg L.P. for the principal market on which the common stock trades or is quoted for the ten (10) trading days preceding the proposed conversion date. Subject to adjustment as described in the notes, the conversion price may not be more than $0.30 nor less than $0.20. There are no registration requirements with respect to the shares of common stock underlying the notes or the warrants. 

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the September 2010 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at 12% per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of fifteen percent at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12% from a total of $693,260 to a total of $776,451.

 

During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision). If our other note and warrant holders agree to waive the antidilution provisions of their securities on the same basis as agreed to by the Investors, then we will no longer be required to report a derivative liability in its financial statements with the accompanying quarterly adjustments to its financial statements and will transfer the amount shown as a derivative liability to equity.

 

The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended from dates between September 3, 2015 and September 23, 2016 to January 1, 2017.

 

The following table shows the activity in the September 2010 10% Convertible Notes by fiscal year:

 

Activity in the September 2010 10% Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance  $743,600 
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012   (405,500)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   (30,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014   (25,000)
Increase in principal balance due to 12% extension fee   33,972 
Balance as of March 31, 2014  $317,072 

 

F-19
 

 

APRIL 2011 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In April 2011, we entered into a Subscription Agreement with two accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) providing for the issuance and sale of convertible promissory notes and corresponding warrants in the aggregate principal amount of $385,000. The closing under the Subscription Agreement resulted in the issuance and sale by us of (i) convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $385,000, (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,004,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, and (iii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,004,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.175 per share. The convertible promissory notes bear interest compounded monthly at the annual rate of 10% and mature on April 1, 2016 (see below). The aggregate gross cash proceeds to us were $350,000, the balance of the principal amount representing a due diligence fee and an original issuance discount. The convertible promissory notes are convertible at the option of the holders into shares of our common stock at a price per share equal to eighty percent (80%) of the average of the three lowest closing bid prices of the common stock as reported by Bloomberg L.P. for the principal market on which the common stock trades or is quoted for the ten (10) trading days preceding the proposed conversion date. Subject to adjustment as described in the notes, the conversion price may not be more than $0.20 nor less than $0.10. There are no registration requirements with respect to the shares of common stock underlying the notes or the warrants.

 

In addition, we issued (i) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 812,500 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.125 per share, and (ii) five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 812,500 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.175 per share to the Purchasers. These warrants were issued as an antidilution adjustment under certain common stock purchase warrants held by the Purchasers that were acquired from us in September 2010.

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the April 2011 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at 12% per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of 15% at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12% from a total of $693,260 to a total of $776,451.

 

During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision).

 

The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended from dates between September 3, 2015 and September 23, 2016 to January 1, 2017.

 

As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the April 2011 10% Convertible Notes and the 12% extension fee noted above increased the principal balance by $48,048 to a principal balance of $448,448.

 

JULY & AUGUST 2011 10% CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2011, we raised $357,656 in 10% convertible notes. Those notes had a fixed conversion price of $0.09 per share and carried an interest rate of 10%. The convertible notes matured in July and August 2012. We also issued those investors five year warrants to purchase 3,973,957 shares of common stock at $0.125 per share.

 

F-20
 

 

We measured the fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of the notes and recorded a $257,926 discount against the principal of the notes. We amortized this discount using the effective interest method over the term of the note.

 

Effective March 31, 2014, the holders of the three notes totaling $100,000 converted all of their principal and accrued interest into 1,438,700 shares of our common stock at the contractual conversion price of $0.09 per share.

 

At March 31, 2014, the remaining outstanding principal balance was $257,655, all of which was in default. We are recording interest at the default interest rate of 15%.

 

SEPTEMBER 2011 CONVERTIBLE NOTES

 

In September 2011, we issued $253,760 of convertible notes, convertible at $0.07 per share. Such notes originally matured in September 2012.

 

On March 31, 2014, we entered into separate Amendments to Convertible Notes and Warrants (collectively, the “Amendments”) with three accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) who own certain convertible promissory notes (collectively, the “Notes”) and warrants (collectively, the “Warrants”) previously issued by us on various dates between December 5, 2007 and September 23, 2011, including the September 2011 Convertible Notes.

 

Prior to the Amendments, the Notes were past maturity and were in default, resulting in the accrual of interest at the applicable default interest rate. The Amendments extended the maturity date of each of the Notes to April 1, 2016, which permits us to classify them as long-term liabilities. As a result of the Amendments, the Notes are no longer in default and the non-default interest rate for all of the Notes was set at 12% per annum, which represents a reduction from the default interest rates of 15% at which interest had been accruing. By entering into the Amendments, we also agreed to increase the currently outstanding principal amount of the Notes by 12%, which in the case of the September 2011 Notes, they increased from $9,760 to $10,931

 

During the period from October 2011 to February 2014, the Investors had converted, at conversion prices between $.0546 and $.07 per share, portions of principal and interest outstanding under the Notes and certain other convertible promissory notes previously issued to them by us. Certain antidilution provisions applicable to such notes should have resulted in such conversions being effected at a conversion price of $.042 per share. Accordingly, pursuant to the Amendments, we issued to the investors an aggregate of 4,507,105 shares of the Company’s Common Stock, which represents the additional shares of Common Stock that would have been issued to the Investors had such conversions been effected at $.042 per share.

 

The Amendments also provide that if all of our currently outstanding promissory notes and warrants that contain antidilution adjustment provisions (other than the Investors’ Notes and Warrants) are amended to remove, or the holders thereof waive, such provisions, then any similar antidilution provisions in the Investors’ Notes and Warrants will automatically be deemed removed. In addition, for so long as the Investors’ Notes and Warrants are outstanding, we will not be permitted to issue any common stock or common stock equivalents (or modify, with equivalent effect, any outstanding common stock or common stock equivalents) at a lower price than the then-current conversion price of the Notes and exercise price of the Warrants (with certain issuances to be excepted from this general provision). If our other note and warrant holders agree to waive the antidilution provisions of their securities on the same basis as agreed to by the Investors, then we will no longer be required to report a derivative liability in its financial statements with the accompanying quarterly adjustments to its financial statements and will transfer the amount shown as a derivative liability to equity.

 

The Amendments also set the conversion price of the Notes, as well as the exercise price at which shares of our common stock can be purchased under the Warrants, at $.042 per share. By virtue of the Amendments, the expiration dates of the Warrants also were extended to January 1, 2017.

 

The following table shows the conversions into principal of the September 2011 Convertible Notes by fiscal year:

 

Activity in the September 2011 Convertible Notes
Initial principal balance  $253,760 
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2012   (15,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2013   (60,000)
Conversions during the fiscal year ended March 31, 2014   (169,000)
Increase in principal balance due to extension fee   1,171 
Balance as of March 31, 2014  $10,931 

 

F-21
 

 

LAW FIRM NOTE NUMBER 1

 

On March 22, 2012, we entered into a Promissory Note with our corporate law firm for the amount of $75,000, which represented the majority of the amount we owed to that firm at that time. The Promissory Note originally had a maturity date of December 31, 2012 and bears interest at 5% per annum. The note is convertible at the option of the holder into shares of our common stock at a 10% discount to the market price of the common stock on the date prior to conversion with a floor price on such conversions of $0.08 per share. The holder subsequently agreed to extend the Maturity Date of the Note first to October 1, 2013, then to September 30, 2013, and now the expiration date of this note is again extended to October 1, 2014. As of March 31, 2014, there have not been any conversions of the Law Firm Note.

 

LAW FIRM NOTE NUMBER 2

 

On June 4, 2013, we entered into a Promissory Note with our corporate law firm for the amount of $47,000, which represented approximately 50% of the amount we owed to that firm for services in 2012. The Promissory Note had a maturity date of October 1, 2014 and bore interest at 5% per annum. The note was convertible at the option of the holder into shares of our common stock at a 10% discount to the market price of the common stock on the date prior to conversion with a floor price on such conversions of $0.07 per share.

 

Effective March 31, 2014, our law firm converted this note and all related accrued interest into 302,043 shares of our common stock at a conversion price of $0.16 per share.

 

6. EQUITY TRANSACTIONS 

 

COMMON STOCK AND WARRANTS

 

Aethlon Medical, Inc. Equity Transactions in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014

 

Common Stock Issuances in the Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2014:

 

In June 2013, we completed a unit subscription agreement with three accredited investors pursuant to which we issued 1,580,248 shares of our common stock and 790,124 warrants to purchase our common stock for net cash proceeds of $128,000. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.121 per share.

 

In June 2013, we issued to our CEO the remaining 3,400,000 shares under his restricted share grant, all of which were vested.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2013, we issued 3,675,278 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of three notes issued by the Company in exchange for the partial conversion of principal and interest in an aggregate amount of $246,500 at an average conversion price of $0.07 per share.

 

During the three months ended June 30, 2013, we issued 222,734 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.10 per share in payment for legal services valued at $21,750 based on the value of the services provided.

 

In August 2013, we completed a unit subscription agreement with four accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) pursuant to which we issued 900,901 shares of our common stock and 450,451 warrants to purchase our common stock in exchange for net cash proceeds of $100,000. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.167 per share.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 933,522 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.14 per share in payment for legal and scientific consulting services valued at $127,593 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2013, we issued 1,168,343 shares of restricted common stock at an average price of $0.10 per share in payment for investor relations and public relations services valued at $115,000 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended September 30 2013, we issued 2,795,367 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of four notes issued by the Company in exchange for the partial or full conversion of principal and interest in an aggregate amount of $173,960 at an average conversion price of $0.06 per share.

 

During the three months ended December 31, 2013, we entered into a unit purchase agreement and subscription agreements with 32 accredited investors pursuant to which we issued 14,367,200 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase our common stock for gross cash proceeds of $1,795,900. Such warrants have an exercise price of $0.22 per share. A FINRA registered broker-dealer was engaged as placement agent in connection with the above Unit Purchase Agreement. We paid the placement agent an aggregate cash fee in the amount of $270,508 and will issue the placement agent or its designees warrants to purchase an aggregate of 2,155,080 shares of our common stock. We also paid $78,360 in other costs and fees, including legal fees, blue sky fees and escrow costs. The net proceeds that we received totaled $1,447,032.

 

F-22
 

 

AETHLON MEDICAL, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

MARCH 31, 2014 AND 2013

 

During the three months ended December 31 2013, we issued 1,465,200 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of two notes issued by us in exchange for the partial or full conversion of accrued interest in an aggregate amount of $80,000 at an average conversion price of $0.05 per share.

 

During the three months ended March 31 2014, we issued 2,638,179 shares of restricted common stock to the holders of five notes issued by us in exchange for the partial or full conversion of accrued interest in an aggregate amount of $226,316 at an average conversion price of $0.09 per share.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, we issued 346,770 shares of common stock pursuant to our S-8 registration statement covering our Amended 2010 Stock Plan at an average price of $0.19 per share in payment for legal services valued at $65,250 based on the value of the services provided.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2014, we issued 399,781 shares of restr